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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Karen Miller and Donna Clark

The paper aims to explore the increasing feminisation of the medical profession and career progression of women in the medical profession. Furthermore, the paper explores…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the increasing feminisation of the medical profession and career progression of women in the medical profession. Furthermore, the paper explores the implications of gender segregation in the medical profession for health service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of studies in this area and draws upon primary, empirical research with medical practitioners and medical students. However, unlike most other studies the sample includes male and female participants. The research involved élite interviews and self‐completion questionnaires in order to provide perspectives of both male and female medical practitioners and medical students.

Findings

The findings are consistent with those of other studies; that gender discrimination and segregation is still prevalent in the medical profession. But there are significant differences in perceptions between the genders. Moreover, it is concluded that the gendered career structure and organisational culture of the health sector and medical profession create a role conflict between personal and professional lives. The current difficulties in reconciling this role conflict create barriers to the career progression of women in the medical profession.

Research limitations/implications

Further research in this area could include a longitudinal study of medical students and the impact of changes in the design of medical training and career structures to assess whether these changes enable female career progression in the medical profession. Further analysis is needed of gendered practices and career development in specific specialist areas, and the role of the medical profession, NHS and Royal Colleges should play in addressing gender and career progression in medicine.

Practical implications

Gender segregation (vertical and horizontal) in the medical profession will have implications for the attraction, retention and increased shortages of practitioners in hospital and surgical specialities with the resultant economic and health provision inefficiencies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a review of literature in this area, thereby providing a longitudinal perspective of gender and the medical profession. Moreover, the research sample includes both male and female medical practitioners and medical students, which provides perspectives from both genders and from those who have experience within the medical profession and from those beginning their career in the medical profession. The research will be of value to the medical profession, the NHS and Royal Colleges of Medicine.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Shawn McEntee

This paper uses a social network approach to explore converging world‐systems hypotheses regarding the effects of increasing integration of socialist countries into the…

Abstract

This paper uses a social network approach to explore converging world‐systems hypotheses regarding the effects of increasing integration of socialist countries into the capitalist world economy since the height of the Cold War. Research on interdependence and other power relations among states in the world order cite the development of Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) and their expanding numbers as evidence of an evermore sophisticated network in which countries have unique positions related to their functioning in the world order. Theories of International Development and International Relations suggest that at the beginning of the Cold War, capitalist states and socialist states functioned in effectively mutually exclusive realms. The balance of power between the US and the USSR perpetuated a world order in which, for the most pan, capitalist states did not engage in political or economic relations with socialist states and vice versa.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Heather Clark, Frederic Dimanche, Rebecca Cotter and Donna Lee-Rosen

This paper aims to provide perspectives on human capital challenges for the events industry in Canada. Industry and educator perspectives are featured in two segments of the paper.

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641

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide perspectives on human capital challenges for the events industry in Canada. Industry and educator perspectives are featured in two segments of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of the events sector in Canada and includes a literature review clarifying key definitions and terms. Industry and educator perspectives highlight ongoing discussions related to some of the human capital challenges identified in the paper.

Findings

This paper explores challenges related to human capital such as the pressures of working in the events industry and finding a work – life balance given the demands of the profession. Human capital challenges related to the preparedness of professionals and the need for continued certification and training are also discussed. A potential solution considers licensing and industry-wide certification. Consideration of the benefits and requirements of industry-wide certification and licensing is ongoing.

Practical implications

This paper emphasizes the need for cooperation between industry and educators to ensure that new events professionals have the necessary skills training and can recognize the need to contribute to the events industry throughout their careers.

Originality/value

This paper considers perspectives from education and industry and emphasizes challenges that are relevant and current for existing and future events professionals in Canada.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

John Clark Griffith and Donna L. Roberts

Emergency service departments face changing mission requirements, budget constraints and a demanding work environment. This study examined the perceptions of fire chiefs…

Abstract

Purpose

Emergency service departments face changing mission requirements, budget constraints and a demanding work environment. This study examined the perceptions of fire chiefs, officers and firefighters who attended the National Professional Development Symposium on the use of a tiered approach when responding to calls, the continued increase in medical calls and mental health services available to fire service personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examined the perceptions of fire chiefs, officers and firefighters who attended the National Professional Development Symposium on the use of a tiered approach when responding to calls, the continued increase in medical calls and mental health services available to fire service personnel.

Findings

Survey respondents indicated that they either are currently or would consider using a tiered approach to sending a fire engine and crew or a lighter vehicle to medical or other calls based requirements identified using a tiered approach.

Research limitations/implications

This idea has future implications regarding the vehicle mix of fire stations as administrators seek to meet the needs of the public most effectively. Survey responses also noted the need for mental health services arguing that care seeking firefighters should have the option of getting mental health services within the station or at an external location. Calls involving babies or young children were overwhelming cited as the most difficult. Additionally, 95% of respondents indicated a belief that most firefighters suffer from PTSD.

Practical implications

Recommendations include: A larger scale survey and analysis of first responder perceptions based on this study. Identifying “best practices” of the most effective “tiered response” approaches to deploying emergency services resources to calls. Studying Mental Health services combating PTSD to identify best practices. Lastly, emergency services administrators should consider changes to the “vehicle mix” when equipping or reequipping stations.

Social implications

Social implications include use of a “tiered response” approach to emergency calls and focusing how best to support the mental health needs of firefighters.

Originality/value

Fire Departments are only beginning to explore the idea of using a tiered response to respond to emergencies. This study identifies both short and long term implications of using a tired approach. A secondary emphasis of this study explores difficult calls and PTSD issues faced by firefighters.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Drew Davidson

This special issue of On the Horizon focuses on strategies for applying games, simulations and interactive experiences in learning contexts. A facet of this issue is the…

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243

Abstract

This special issue of On the Horizon focuses on strategies for applying games, simulations and interactive experiences in learning contexts. A facet of this issue is the interactive and collaborative method in which it was created. Instead of separated individual articles, the authors and editors have orchestrated the articles together, reading and writing as a whole so that the concepts across the articles resonate with each other. It is the intention that this special issue will serve as the basis of many more discussions across conference panels, online forums and interactive media that in turn will engender more special collaborative issues.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2018

Donna M. Kelly and Sheranne Fairley

Event portfolios promote synergies among events and stakeholders within a destination in order to maximise resources. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Event portfolios promote synergies among events and stakeholders within a destination in order to maximise resources. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of relationships in the creation and maintenance of an event portfolio using the four stages of Parvatiyar and Sheth’s (2000) process model of relationship marketing: formation, management and governance, performance evaluation, and evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with tourism and government stakeholders involved in the creation and maintenance of an event portfolio within a single destination.

Findings

The destination outlined clear strategic goals through an event strategy. An Events Board was established to bring together key stakeholders from tourism, events, and government to oversee the development of an event portfolio. The Events Board gave advice to relevant tourism and government stakeholders on which events they should provide funding. Developing relationships was not a stated objective, but the Events Board realised the importance of relationships to create and maintain the destination’s event portfolio. Long-term funding contracts were used as a mechanism to establish relationships and were an impetus for interaction. Relationships were also maintained through dedicated staff who managed the relationships between the destination stakeholders and the events.

Practical implications

Understanding factors that contribute to the successful creation and maintenance of event portfolios can inform destination stakeholders who are responsible for generating tourism through events.

Originality/value

Limited research has examined the creation and maintenance of event portfolios. This study provides insight into the central importance of relationships in creating and maintaining an event portfolio.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Philip M. Clark

I've finally seen a demonstration of a Management Information System for a library that works. I've been searching for a working example of an integrated system that…

Abstract

I've finally seen a demonstration of a Management Information System for a library that works. I've been searching for a working example of an integrated system that includes data from a circulation/OPAC system, an external accounting package, an external human resources file, branch statistics, and community demographic files. And, by integrated, I mean accessible from a single workstation via a single program.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Robin Ayers Frkal and Noel Criscione-Naylor

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the challenges to women’s authentic leadership identities contribute to their decisions to abandon leadership positions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the challenges to women’s authentic leadership identities contribute to their decisions to abandon leadership positions mid-career. It examines the critical career moments and underlying themes behind these women’s decisions to leave.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on semi-structured interviews (n = 9) with women between the ages of 32-53 who had opted-out of mid-level corporate leadership positions.

Findings

The study found that work–life balance was not the primary factor in women’s decisions to leave. Instead, the women in the study reflected on their inability to be themselves and contribute perceived value to the organization as triggering their decisions to leave.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations in using a small sample of women selected through the researchers’ social media networks resulting in limited cultural and racial diversity.

Practical implications

Misconceptions about women’s decisions to leave corporate leadership mid-career misleads human resource (HR) practices and initiatives focused on retaining female talent. Organizations need to recognize and reshape the organizational environment to support women to be their authentic self and make the value of their contributions more transparent.

Originality/value

The paper is original in that it examines opt-out from the lens of women’s leadership identities in corporate contexts. There are limited studies that have examined the connections between identity and women’s career decisions beyond work–ife balance. It provides practical value to HR practitioners and organizations focused on retaining female talent.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Donna E. Cromer and Andrea R. Testi

Dynamic and effective reference librarians are the single most important factor in ensuring quality reference services in any library. The best reference librarians are…

Abstract

Dynamic and effective reference librarians are the single most important factor in ensuring quality reference services in any library. The best reference librarians are intelligent and curious, have good social interaction skills, are knowledgeable about both reference practices and resources, possess relevant subject expertise, and are highly motivated to provide excellent reference services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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