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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Sylvain K. Cibangu, Mark Hepworth and Donna Champion

This paper relayed an important line of Mark Hepworth’s work, which engages with information technologies and development. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper relayed an important line of Mark Hepworth’s work, which engages with information technologies and development. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a subfield of library and information science (LIS) for development to reclaim the role of information services and systems for social change in rural areas. The paper looked at the extent of development gained with the advent of mobile phones.

Design/methodology/approach

Rather than undertaking traditional large-scale, quantitative, context-independent and survey-type research, the paper employed capability approach and semi-structured interviews to ascertain the experiences that mobile phone kiosk vendors in the rural Congo had of mobile phones.

Findings

It was found that mobile phones should be geared towards the liberation, and not utilization or commodification of humans and their needs and that mobile phones were not a catalyst of human basic capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Since the method employed is an in-depth qualitative analysis of mobile phone kiosk vendors, obtained results can be used to enrich or inform mobile phone experiences in other settings and groups.

Practical implications

This paper provided empirical evidence as to how an important group of mobile phone users could harness development with their mobiles.

Originality/value

Most LIS literature has presented mobile phones along the lines of information freedom or access, mass subscription, adoption rates, technological and entrepreneurial innovation, micro-credits, etc. However, the paper placed the topic development at the heart of LIS debates.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Duane Windsor

A proposed typology of moral exemplars in business highlights instances selected to illustrate standards for inclusion. The typology distinguishes among champions, heroes…

Abstract

Purpose

A proposed typology of moral exemplars in business highlights instances selected to illustrate standards for inclusion. The typology distinguishes among champions, heroes, and saints as different kinds of business exemplars. The typology reflects variations in both specific decision conditions and moral value emphases of business actors. The typology also differentiates moral exemplars from moral neutrals (i.e., amoral actors) and moral sinners (i.e., moral value scofflaws). The objective is to advance understanding of moral character and moral courage in business settings.

Methodology/approach

The methodology combines original conceptual argument and brief case summaries taken from available literature. The chapter is not a systematic survey of literature but cites key works. Construction of the typology involved iteration between conceptual development and case interpretation.

Findings

The chapter separates business cases into private business and public business, and applies Adam Smith’s distinction between citizenship and good citizenship. An additional distinction is made between extreme conditions and normal conditions. Moral heroism in business is restricted to life-and-death or strongly analogous situations in extreme conditions such as hazardous whistleblowing. Moral sainthood in business involves extreme maximization of a single value going far beyond simple compliance with legal requirements and typical ethical norms – Smith’s definition of citizenship. Moral championing in business concerns some degree of lesser self-sacrifice in defense of important values reflecting Smith’s definition of good citizenship.

Research Limitations and Implications

The chapter is a selection of literature undertaken in iteration with the conceptual development effort. The original research aspect of the chapter is thus quite limited. The author is not positioned to judge the accuracy of published information, for or against a particular instance. The classifications thus depend on whether the instance would, if the generally reported facts are basically accurate, serve as a reasonable illustration of standards for inclusion. Criticisms have been made concerning some of the instances discussed here.

Practical Implications

The emphasis is on providing standards for defining moral exemplars for business to suggest how much can be accomplished in business through moral influence.

Originality

The conceptual contribution is original, although drawing on the philosophical literature debate about saints and heroes. The chapter treats exemplar as the overarching construct, separated into three kinds: heroes, saints, and champions. Sinner is implicit in the notion of saint. The chapter adds moral champions and moral neutrals to isolate moral heroism. The cases exist in the literature, but have been combined together here for the first time.

Details

Moral Saints and Moral Exemplars
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-075-8

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Jane Glover, Donna Champion, Kevin Daniels and Grahame Boocock

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how small firms work at a micro-level, applying Bourdieu’s Capital Theory to give insight into the way individuals use the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how small firms work at a micro-level, applying Bourdieu’s Capital Theory to give insight into the way individuals use the social and cultural capital at their disposal, to innovate and solve problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied qualitative methods to explore problem solving and innovation activities at the micro-level in small firms, using interviews and thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that, compared to firms with lower levels of social and cultural capital, firms which possess higher levels of social and cultural capital have a higher success rate in problem solving and are more likely to engage in innovative activity. Social and cultural capitals complement and reinforce one another in small firms, for example an enhanced ability to utilise networks (social capital) allows small firms to access a greater diversity of knowledge (cultural capital).

Originality/value

Little is known about how different forms of capital are utilised in the day-to-day operations and problem solving of small firms: the application of Bourdieu’s Capital Theory offered an original frame in which to explore these activities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Neil F. Doherty, Donna Champion and Leitao Wang

The purpose of this paper is to report on an exploratory study to revisit and critically reappraise the impact of IT upon organisational structure, by exploring how the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on an exploratory study to revisit and critically reappraise the impact of IT upon organisational structure, by exploring how the deployment of ERP, when accompanied by a specific strategic orientation, impacted upon the host organisation's structural design.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was initially enacted through a postal questionnaire survey of IT managers within a sample of China's largest manufacturing organisations. Follow‐up interviews were then conducted with senior managers, who had first‐hand experience of working on ERP implementations, to help to more fully understand the impact of ERP upon organisational structure.

Findings

The study found that the implementation of ERP technology and the strategic orientation of the host organisation are both likely to modify the structural design of Chinese manufacturing organisations. Moreover, it has been found that the success of an ERP deployment is a stronger predictor of organisational form than the scale of the deployment. The results of the study would also suggest that ERP is more likely to affect structural changes, when deployed in the presence of a complementary “prospector” corporate strategy.

Practical implications

The study provides clear new evidence that ERP is likely to have a significant impact upon organisational structure, but, because of the complexity of the technology and the uniqueness of every organisational context, the authors offer no simple prescriptions or panaceas as to how it should be managed. However, managers should be aware that an ERP implementation will almost certainly affect organisational structure, and then take steps to ensure that such changes are carefully and proactively managed.

Originality/value

There is already a rich and established literature with regard to the impact of IT upon organisational structure. However, it could be argued that by focussing upon ERP, by explicitly modelling the effect of strategy and by taking a holistic view of organisational structure, the paper is able to offer a far more subtle view of the complexities of the relationship between IT and organisational structure than prior studies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Tracy Enright Patterson, Donna R. Dinkin and Heather Champion

The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors.

Findings

The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program.

Practical implications

This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience.

Originality/value

This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Justin Harrison and Lorna Rourke

The purpose of this paper is to describe the integration of information literacy into each year of a Bachelor of Arts and Science (BAS) program at the University of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the integration of information literacy into each year of a Bachelor of Arts and Science (BAS) program at the University of Guelph, Ontario, and to explain the role of librarian mentors in this program.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature related to mentoring and librarians, explains the BAS program, and outlines the library's integration into the BAS curriculum. It discusses mentoring, assessment, and future goals, and provides some librarians' observations and advice.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the benefits of librarian‐student mentoring and of integrating information literacy into each year of an undergraduate degree program.

Practical implications

Since the mentoring of students by librarians is rarely mentioned in the literature, this description of our mentoring program may inspire other librarians to set up librarian‐student partnerships at their institutions. Our successful application of information literacy into every year of a degree program and our partnerships with faculty and students may serve as models for other libraries.

Originality/value

The experience of the University of Guelph library may show other libraries how to integrate information literacy into a program efficiently and effectively.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Kimberly Underwood, Joy Taylor, Donna Smith and J. Medgar Roberts

This paper aims to provide a critical examination of the career trajectories of Black male educators through the discussion of key issues relevant to the professional…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a critical examination of the career trajectories of Black male educators through the discussion of key issues relevant to the professional development and advancement of this population.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors approach this paper through the examination of literature related to Black male educators. The authors seek to provide insight into the status of Black male educators through a critical focus of scholarship in the three critical areas of Black male educator recruitment, retention and mobility.

Findings

This examination supports the need to generate sustainable initiatives to diversify our nation’s classrooms and create additional opportunities for Black male representation in school leadership positions. Effectively dismantling the entrenched hurdles many encounter within their teaching careers requires a concerted commitment by advocates, policymakers and school administrators at all levels. Additionally, there is a continued need for stakeholders to keep the diversification of P-12 schools as a key priority in current education reform strategies.

Social implications

This paper serves as an impetus to highlight the continued need for further exploration and consequential action to increase the numbers of Black males in the teaching profession.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature surrounding Black male educators by providing a holistic view of their career trajectories of Black male educators and shedding light on the need for ongoing efforts to diversify the P-12 teaching workforce.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade…

Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Sue S. Feldman, Scott Buchalter, Dawn Zink, Donna J. Slovensky and Leslie Wynn Hayes

The purpose of this paper is to understand the degree to which a quality and safety culture exists after healthcare workers in an academic medical center complete a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the degree to which a quality and safety culture exists after healthcare workers in an academic medical center complete a quality improvement and patient safety education program focused on developing leaders to change the future of healthcare quality and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) short-form was used for measuring the culture of quality and safety among healthcare workers who were graduates of an academic medical center’s healthcare quality and safety program. A 53 percent response rate from program alumni resulted in 54 usable responses.

Findings

This study found that 42 (78 percent) of the respondents report that they are currently working in a healthcare quality and safety culture, with 25 (59 percent) reporting promotion into a leadership role after completion of the quality improvement education program. This compares favorably to AHRQ culture of safety survey results obtained by the same academic medical center within the year prior revealing only 63 percent of all inpatient employees surveyed reported working in a quality and safety culture.

Research limitations/implications

The study design precluded knowing to what degree a quality and safety culture, as measured by the SAQ, existed prior to attending the healthcare quality and safety program.

Originality/value

This study has practical value for other organizations considering a quality and safety education program. For organizations seeking to build capacity in quality and safety, training future leaders through a robust curriculum is essential. This may be achieved through development of an internal training program or through attending an outside organization for education.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

William F. Danaher and Trisha L. Crawshaw

We use framing theory to analyze songs and poetry from the US women’s movement. Specifically, we utilize frame amplification and transformation as concepts to answer the…

Abstract

We use framing theory to analyze songs and poetry from the US women’s movement. Specifically, we utilize frame amplification and transformation as concepts to answer the question: did messages in songs and poetry from the women’s movement change as the movement achieved its original goal of suffrage? Furthermore, are there new organizational goals mentioned in musical artifacts from the second-wave feminist movement? And, if so, why? We find that songs became more radical in the second wave of the women’s movement. This shift reflects and reconstitutes the changing concerns of social movement activists. We demonstrate how frame amplification and transformation are important theoretical concepts in explaining the ideological shifts found in songs and poetry from the first- and second-wave women’s movement.

Details

Bringing Down Divides
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-406-4

Keywords

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