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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Joonheui Bae and Dong-Mo Koo

Most of the research on collaborative consumption platforms (CCPs) has focused on motivational drives, and little research has been conducted on the problem of unbalanced…

Abstract

Purpose

Most of the research on collaborative consumption platforms (CCPs) has focused on motivational drives, and little research has been conducted on the problem of unbalanced information sharing, also known as the “lemons problem,” and signals. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a netnography and an experiment.

Findings

The netnographic study showed that participants tend to use low ratings and negative reviews as cues implying more searches, use ratings as an anchor to adjust other information, and employ differing cognitive information-processing styles. The experimental results show that, in a normal environment (when ratings are high), visualizers (verbalizers) have more of an intention to use CCPs when they are exposed to abundant pictures (textual cues); however, when the cues lead to a further information search (when the ratings are low), this search behavior pattern is reversed: visualizers (verbalizers) have more of an intention to use CCPs when they are exposed to abundant textual cues (pictures).

Research limitations/implications

This study extends previous research by showing that people frequently use differing heuristics depending on the context; that ratings have an anchoring effect and guide people in selecting a signal to use and condition how they use it; and that visualizers prefer text cues to pictorial cues when trying to make informed decisions under a condition that points to a further information search. These results are opposite of previous assertion.

Practical implications

Marketers are advised to provide a mechanism by which users can extract the cues they need and reduce the less urgent ones; devise a mechanism that screens participants and divides them into two categories: those who post honest evaluations and those who do not; and reduce the opportunistic behaviors of partners on both sides.

Originality/value

The current study addresses consumers’ use of information posted by other consumers on CCPs and demonstrates that participants use low ratings and negative reviews as cues implying more searches, use ratings as an anchor to adjust other information, and employ differing cognitive information-processing styles. Previous research rarely addressed these information search behaviors of consumers on CCPs.

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Minyoung Lee, Joonheui Bae and Dong-Mo Koo

Previous research on luxury consumption has focused on conspicuous consumption; however, research on consumers' self-conceptual mechanism in inconspicuous luxury…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research on luxury consumption has focused on conspicuous consumption; however, research on consumers' self-conceptual mechanism in inconspicuous luxury consumption context is scarce. The present study aims to investigate various self-concepts and their mechanisms for inconspicuous and conspicuous luxury consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment with 215 participants from online survey website was conducted, and the hypotheses were tested using PROCESS Macro 3.4.

Findings

The study findings are as follows. Materialistic consumers' preference between inconspicuous and conspicuous luxury products is dependent on distinctive self-conceptual mechanism. More specifically, materialistic consumers with independent self-construal prefer inconspicuous luxury brands because of high need for uniqueness, whereas non-materialistic consumers with interdependent self-construal prefer conspicuous luxury products because of high self-monitoring.

Research limitations/implications

The present study uniquely shows conditions (moderated mediation) that the link between need for uniqueness (self-monitoring) and luxury consumption is stronger for those with independent (interdependent) self-construal than for those with interdependent (independent) self-construal. The present results extend and help better understanding of mechanisms and conditions of conspicuous and inconspicuous luxury consumption.

Practical implications

Marketers are advised to design and produce unique vs popular luxury brands depending on consumer's motives and different self-concepts.

Originality/value

This research contributes to extant literature by distinguishing between conspicuous and inconspicuous luxury consumption with two different mechanisms (need for uniqueness and self-monitoring). The present study further demonstrates that the two mechanisms are strongly sustained differently depending on consumer's levels of self-construal.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Joonheui Bae, Sang Jin Kim, Kyung Hoon Kim and Dong-Mo Koo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between game items and mood management to show the affective value of game items. Specifically, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between game items and mood management to show the affective value of game items. Specifically, the study examines the impact of interaction between two negative mood states (stress vs boredom) and types of game items (functional vs decorative) on the purchasing intention of game items.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted to predict the outcomes of using game items.

Findings

Game users effectively manage their level of arousal and mood valence using game items. The selective exposure theory provides additional understanding of different purchasing behaviors, suggesting that stressed users are more likely to purchase decorative items while bored users purchase functional items to manage their mood.

Research limitations/implications

The study results show the affective role of game items in mood management. While previous studies focused on the cognitive and functional aspects of purchasing game items, this study extends the value of game items as augmented products.

Practical implications

When launching new games, companies should provide game users free game items for mood management. In addition, to increase intervention potential and behavioral affinity, marketers need to develop and launch more game item types.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of affective value of game items by applying mood management and selective exposure theories to explain the purchase intention of game items.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Joonheui Bae, Hyun-Hee Park and Dong-Mo Koo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives moderated by a user characteristic (heavy users) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives moderated by a user characteristic (heavy users) on game-item purchase intention and uniquely propose that this moderation is serially mediated by self-esteem and compassion.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (CSR initiatives: high vs low) by 2 (user characteristic: heavy vs non-heavy users) experimental design was employed to test the propositions in the context of an online mobile game.

Findings

The results demonstrate that heavy users with high-perceived CSR initiatives have a higher intention to purchase game items. The results also show that self-esteem and compassion fully and serially mediate the effect of moderation on the intention to purchase game items.

Originality/value

This serial mediation mechanism has rarely been proposed and tested in previous studies and may contribute to extending the literature.

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Hyo-Jin Jeong and Dong-Mo Koo

The present study aims to demonstrate that the volunteering licenses people to indulge in luxury purchase, and both heightened moral self-evaluation and reduced guilt…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to demonstrate that the volunteering licenses people to indulge in luxury purchase, and both heightened moral self-evaluation and reduced guilt mediate the effect of licensing on ratings of a luxury item by implementing three experimental studies. This study explained the moral licensing behavior using a passive goal guidance model: i.e., people license themselves to indulge when people perceive progress on one of their long-term goals.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, three experiments were used to test hypotheses.

Findings

The present paper is new in terms of three aspects. First, moral self-evaluation as a mediator is tested using a more stringent method in comparison to prior studies. Second, reduced guilt which had not yet been explicitly tested is established as a mediator. Third, the present study demonstrates that the passive goal guidance model as a valid theory in explaining the licensing behavior by showing that when people perceive progress in a long-term goal by helping others in need, they are more likely to engage in dysfunctional luxury brand purchases. Previous studies have used credentialing theory to explain this.

Originality/value

The present study established and confirmed that reduced guilt is a mediator in the licensing effect on the purchase of luxury items.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Hyo-Jin Jeong and Dong-Mo Koo

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model to test whether the combined effects of valence and objectivity/subjectivity of online review have an effect on consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model to test whether the combined effects of valence and objectivity/subjectivity of online review have an effect on consumer judgment and whether e-WOM platforms have a moderating effect.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 480 respondents participated in online experiments with a four (positive+objective, positive+subjective, negative+objective, and negative+subjective online review) by two (marketer-generated vs consumer-generated brand community web sites) between subject design.

Findings

The experiment showed that: an objective negative online review was rated higher in terms of message usefulness compared to the other types of online reviews; positive reviews, whether they are objective or subjective, were rated higher in terms of attitudes toward and intention to purchase the reviewed product, and the effects of online reviews moderated by e-WOM platforms on consumer judgment were supported.

Research limitations/implications

The present study, based on an established theoretical foundation, will help the research community to gain a deeper understanding of the combined effects of online review valence and attributes on consumer judgment and whether user-generated web community is better for consumers to consult product experience.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can provide interested firms with useful strategies and tactics to enhance users’ acceptance of online reviews in terms of who operates the web sites.

Originality/value

With increasing use of consumers’ online reviews, the present study proposed and tested a comprehensive research model integrating both the valence and objectivity/subjectivity of online review, which has rarely been addressed in previous research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2003

Dong‐Mo Koo

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract…

Abstract

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract and global image component, influence consumers’ satisfaction and how consumers’ satisfaction, in turn, affects store loyalty. The data, collected from a sample of 517 discount retail customers in Daegu, Korea, indicate that: (1) forming the overall attitude is more closely related to in‐store services: atmosphere, employee service, after sales service and merchandising, (2) store satisfaction is formed through perceived store atmosphere and value, (3) the overall attitude has strong influence on satisfaction and loyalty and its impact is much stronger on loyalty than on satisfaction, (4) store loyalty is directly affected by most significantly location, merchandising and after sale service in order, (5) satisfaction is not related to customers’ committed store revisiting behavior. The applications in management and implications for future research are discussed.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Dong‐Mo Koo, Jae‐Jin Kim and Sang‐Hwan Lee

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational effects of personal values on benefits, attributes, and re‐patronage intention in the context of online shopping.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational effects of personal values on benefits, attributes, and re‐patronage intention in the context of online shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Using means‐end chain theory as a basis for the theoretical framework, the paper proposes and tests a conceptual model of the relationships among the constructs of personal values, benefits, attributes, and re‐patronage intention. Hypotheses are proposed, and these are then tested using structural equation modelling on data from 279 experienced online customers in South Korea.

Findings

A personal value of “social affiliation” acts as an enduring belief in motivating a customer to seek hedonic and utilitarian benefits, whereas a personal value of “self actualization” produces motivation to seek only utilitarian benefits. The seeking of hedonic and utilitarian benefits leads customers to evaluate certain attributes of online stores – such as visual design, product assortment, information quality, and after‐sales service. The attributes of online stores have a positive effect on re‐patronage intention.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include problems associated with convenience sampling (dominated by extrinsically oriented shoppers) and measurement errors (with respect to the construct of personal values). Future studies could examine a more diverse range of personal values and online shopping benefits and attributes.

Originality/value

The present study is the first to investigate personal values as enduring and underlying sources of motivation with respect to online shopping. The paper presents an original conceptual model of personal values, shopping benefits, shopping attributes, and re‐patronage intention.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Dong-Mo Koo

This paper aims to investigate whether the interactional effects of recommendation valence, tie strength and service type produce different effects on attitude and buying…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether the interactional effects of recommendation valence, tie strength and service type produce different effects on attitude and buying intention in a social networking context.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 3 × 3 between-subject experiment was carried out, involving 616 participants, and MANOVA was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

The interactions of valence by tie strength and valence by service type affect attitude, but not intention. The review valence × tie strength × service type interaction influences both attitude and intention, and its effect on intention is fully mediated by attitude.

Research limitations/implications

Negative recommendations for credence and experiential services communicated by individuals with no-tie relationships have a strong negative effect on attitude. However, positive recommendations from strong and weak ties for search and experience services are more influential than recommendations from no ties for credence services.

Originality/value

The results are explained by using cue sufficiency theory, which suggests that a single extreme cue serves as a defining feature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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