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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Donde Batten, Gerald Goodman and Susan M. Distefano

Research suggests that improving hospital work environments and solving the nursing shortage are critical to improving patient care. The Houston–Galveston region created…

Abstract

Research suggests that improving hospital work environments and solving the nursing shortage are critical to improving patient care. The Houston–Galveston region created an aggressive approach to this issue by forming an unusual coalition of business, university, and hospital leaders and using a quality improvement approach. Four years later, the project has achieved over 40% participation among hospitals in the 13-county region and includes 50 hospitals employing approximately 15,000 registered nurses. The data that have been collected by this collaborative to date suggests that hospitals are taking action to improve outcomes by modifying their key initiatives to address the attributed causes of poor work environments. From 2004 to 2005, executives of top performing hospitals increasingly attributed successful work environment outcomes to an emphasis on management development and executive-driven initiatives, de-emphasizing specific employee behavior, process, and outcome-based initiatives.

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Claudia Fonseca

To consider transnational aspects linked to the social production of adoptable children in a Brazilian setting.

Abstract

Purpose

To consider transnational aspects linked to the social production of adoptable children in a Brazilian setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Looks at legislation and media reports, giving particular attention to how, during the 1990s, vigorous campaigns in favor of plenary adoption by Brazilian nationals implied the near‐total silencing of alternative forms of childcare such as foster care, and how recent circumstances are reversing this trend.

Findings

Argues that an apparently straightforward conflict between poverty‐stricken families and the state authorities that strip them of parental rights is in fact a highly political issue involving innumerous overseas as well as national influences. National childcare policies that encourage certain childcare options and eliminate others emerge as much from scandals in the media, “consumer demands” by adoptive parents, and philanthropic support as from the more apparent global trends in child welfare legislation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings challenge the view that childcare is a consensual issue with all fronts working for the “child's best interest”. Rather, in this paper, the issue is revealed as a political matter of conflicting interests between unequal categories of caretakers.

Practical implications

This paper has direct relevance for international legislation on child adoption policy.

Originality/value

This paper furnishes a “view from below” on international adoption, putting in question principles that are normally accepted as obvious in international legislation on child rights.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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