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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Donald Stewart

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of an Australian health promoting schools (HPS) project to identify key features of the concept of resilience and how it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of an Australian health promoting schools (HPS) project to identify key features of the concept of resilience and how it can be used in a school setting to develop and strengthen protective factors in young people, as a mechanism for improving social functioning and reducing involvement in risk behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Methods used in the “Resilient Children and Communities” project are described. Then a revue of the academic literature published on theoretical and empirical findings from the “Resilient Children and Communities” project is presented.

Findings

The papers reviewed indicate there is a developing body of evidence to show that the “HPS” is an efficient and effective approach to building resilience amongst school children. Underpinned by Bronfenbrenner's broad ecological framework, benefits have been derived not only for students, but for the whole school community. Such benefits include not only building self-esteem and self-efficacy, peer relationships and relationships between students, teachers and parents, but also school connectedness and feelings of belonging.

Practical implications

The findings from this project provide a strong evidence base identifying the central role of “resilience” in the school culture. This role is cross-cultural and transnational and evidence that resilience can strengthen protective factors has clear implications for the African context, where communicable diseases and neglected tropical diseases pose intractable problems, typically in resource restricted environments.

Originality/value

These findings provide insight into the central role of the school setting in building resilience. Resilience, in turn, can help students survive and thrive under challenging and adverse conditions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Abstract

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Andrew J. Macnab, Faith A. Gagnon and Donald Stewart

The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding the World Health Organization (WHO) HPS model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the consensus as its foundation, this review summarizes the underlying educational and social science concepts and factors that contribute to success or failure of HPS, and incorporates peer reviewed papers based on invited presentations at the colloquium and key related literature.

Findings

HPS increase knowledge and develop behaviors that benefit the health of children, such schools are also an investment in the well-being of the larger community. Importantly for their long-term psychological health “resilience” is generated by effective HPS programs. Professional development initiatives within schools can catalyze greater absorption of the healthy school approach and focus on best practices. Promotion, support, and evaluation of programs are aided by award schemes and oversight by local or national agencies. And significant educational benefits are accrued for trainees from centers of higher learning involved in HPS program delivery.

Practical implications

Educational initiatives that utilize the relative simplicity, low cost, and inherent flexibility of the HPS model can address many significant issues facing today's children. HPS offer an innovative and participatory way to increase the likelihood of the next generation becoming aware of practical ways to positively influence their lifestyle and future well-being. Successful programs are usually those that are relevant, resonate with students, and engage school communities so that they choose to “own” and sustain their program.

Originality/value

The consensus statement provides a benchmark of the current status of HPS, and outlines future directions for this model of health promotion.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2014

Andrew J. Macnab, Donald Stewart and Faith A. Gagnon

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for and potential of World Health Organization (WHO) health promoting schools (HPS) in Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for and potential of World Health Organization (WHO) health promoting schools (HPS) in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Overview of the related literature and presentations at the 2011 Stellenbosch international colloquium on HPS relating to sub-Saharan Africa.

Findings

Schools provide the most efficient and effective way to reach large portions of the population; however, no literature reporting evaluations of HPS from Africa existed ten years ago. The WHO now supports HPS strategies in over 32 African countries, recognizing that the burden of disease, disability and premature death is disproportionately high in the region, and that many of the causes are preventable. Novel applications of the WHO model are increasing; those applicable to Africa include: measures to address the widespread problem of poor oral health, hygiene and nutrition among children; a range of “entry point” activities to initiate HPS with validated evaluation methodology; initiatives centered on gardening relevant for sub-Saharan Africa; opportunities for cross-disciplinary learning opportunities generated by inter-sectoral collaborative HPS programs; and the use of social media and cell phone messaging to deliver health promotion to at-risk teen populations on the continent. Challenges include the need for multi-sectoral collaboration and Ministry leadership, paucity of human resources and stable funding and limited research and evaluation of best practices.

Practical implications

Africa faces significant challenges educating the next generation in the context of health. Strong political action, broad participation and sustained advocacy are required to capitalize on the proven potential of novel initiatives now available to disseminate “knowledge” and “healthy practices” through the WHO HPS model.

Originality/value

Use of HPS offers a flexible and inexpensive avenue of relevance where guidelines and process exist, and evidence of efficacy in Africa is accumulating.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Donald Stewart

Introductory electrochemistry What appears to be a solid piece of metal is really a collection of individual metal atoms held together by mutual attraction. When it is…

Abstract

Introductory electrochemistry What appears to be a solid piece of metal is really a collection of individual metal atoms held together by mutual attraction. When it is placed in water, some of the more energetic atoms detach themselves and go into the water. When they do this they leave some of their electrons behind and emerge from the solid metal as positively charged particles called ions. This is usually shown as:

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Janis K. Zaima, Howard F. Turetsky and Bruce Cochran

Studies that examine the relationship of economic value added (EVA) to market value did not isolate the EVA effect in conjunction with controlling for the economic effect…

Abstract

Studies that examine the relationship of economic value added (EVA) to market value did not isolate the EVA effect in conjunction with controlling for the economic effect of the market. Since the EVA metric is viewed as value‐added apart from the market, operational managers will benefit from a procedure that separates the market driven versus firm driven (EVA) effects. Our paper examines the effects of the economy and EVA on MVA. The results indicate that EVA and GDP significantly affect MVA. Furthermore, the MVA‐EVA relationship shows a systematic bias between the largest MVA firms and the smallest MVA firms. Overall, our study provides implications for corporate executives utilizing EVA to evaluate managerial performance linked to MVA.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Donald Stewart

The first half In the first part (March) the idea was introduced of the metal adopting an electrical potential when it is placed in a solution. This happened because some…

Abstract

The first half In the first part (March) the idea was introduced of the metal adopting an electrical potential when it is placed in a solution. This happened because some of the metal atoms went into the solution forming positively charged particles called ions, and leaving behind electrons in the metal. In shorthand notation:

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

Donald Stewart

In Part 2 I said that the potential E of the metal could be changed from E0 to a new value E1, and that this would upset the equilibrium which holds at Eo resulting in…

Abstract

In Part 2 I said that the potential E of the metal could be changed from E0 to a new value E1, and that this would upset the equilibrium which holds at Eo resulting in corrosion of the metal at E1. The rate of corrosion can be determined from a weight‐loss experiment and converted to an equivalent electrical current I1 using Faradays Laws. Similarly for E2, leading to a corrosion current of I2 etc. The movement of potential, is achieved in practice by coupling the metal sample to a d.c. source with a variable output and completing the circuit through a piece of platignum or similar inert material on which some balancing reaction takes place. The potential to be measured is that of the metal relative to the solution, so a reference electrode and mV meter must be incorporated into the system.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

Donald Stewart

There are few areas in corrosion science which are so confusing to the learner as the ability of certain metals to become passive. This phenomenon was discovered by…

Abstract

There are few areas in corrosion science which are so confusing to the learner as the ability of certain metals to become passive. This phenomenon was discovered by Faraday about 1840 when he showed that although iron reacted vigorously with dilute nitric acid, it was totally “passive” in concentrated nitric acid. The exact mechanisms of the process of passivation are still somewhat obscure but the mechanics of the process are well enough understood for it to be used to protect large steel tanks against attack by sulphuric acid which would otherwise dissolve the tanks in a few days.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

Donald Stewart

The purpose of this series is to show that there is a basic logic in the science which underlies corrosion and that this logic can lead naturally into a consideration of…

Abstract

The purpose of this series is to show that there is a basic logic in the science which underlies corrosion and that this logic can lead naturally into a consideration of the methods which are available for preventing corrosion. There are many different methods and combinations of methods which can be used to prevent or reduce corrosion in metals. I have found it convenient to arrange these in separate groups, arranged according to the fundamental principles on which they are based. Practical details of the methods can be found in most textbooks on corrosion.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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