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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary W Ghikas

Document delivery is a rapidly growing area of interest, yet public policy issues have not been clearly defined and discussed. For that reason, it is essential to begin by…

Abstract

Document delivery is a rapidly growing area of interest, yet public policy issues have not been clearly defined and discussed. For that reason, it is essential to begin by defining what we mean by ‘public’ and ‘private’ sector and by the term ‘document delivery’. Public policy issues can then be identified in four areas: (1) marketplace competition, (2) intellectual property, (3) fair use of public resources, and (4) public good. Because past perception of the issues has been vague, the volume of activity and the economic stakes relatively low, it is still possible for public/private sector roles to be defined in a non‐combative atmosphere, to mutually‐beneficial ends.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Beth S. Woodard

Reference librarians in various library settings are often assigned responsibilities for training students, support staff, or other new professionals, a task for which…

Abstract

Reference librarians in various library settings are often assigned responsibilities for training students, support staff, or other new professionals, a task for which they rarely have sufficient professional education. This bibliography recommends readings on topics that will assist reference librarians in understanding the philosophy of staff development. The readings listed here cover subjects such as: establishing an atmosphere that facilitates learning, assessing training needs, describing competent performance, writing clear and specific objectives, selecting appropriate training methods, maintaining skills and providing feedback, and evaluating the effectiveness of a training program.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Donald Simpson, Eunice Lumsden and Rory McDowall Clark

Several ideas exist about social justice and how inequalities can be tackled to help families and children in poverty. The Coalition government released the UK’s first…

Abstract

Purpose

Several ideas exist about social justice and how inequalities can be tackled to help families and children in poverty. The Coalition government released the UK’s first Child Poverty Strategy in 2011. Pervaded by neoliberal ideology, the strategy mentions “empowering” pre-school services and practitioners within the childcare market “to do more for the most disadvantaged” (Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and Department for Education (DfE) 2011, p. 35). The purpose of this paper is to bring to light how Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) practitioners across England have engaged with policy discussions and adopted expectations concerning their place in addressing child poverty.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a phenomenological qualitative research design the paper draws upon 30 interviews with pre-school practitioners in three geographic areas of England. All interviewees worked with families and children in poverty and were senior ECEC practitioners within their pre-school settings.

Findings

Many interviewees shared the Coalition’s construction of child poverty as a problem of “troubled” parenting. These views pervaded their interaction with parents and intersected with the regulatory influence of “policy technologies” to influence their practice within a context of austerity cuts. This limited practitioners’ poverty sensitivity and their promotion of social justice. Therefore this paper concludes by critiquing the contribution which ECEC practitioners can make to addressing child poverty.

Practical implications

The findings suggest there may be a need for poverty proofing toolkits in the pre-school sector.

Originality/value

This paper provides a rare insight into how pre-school practitioners have engaged with, adopted and adapted assumptions about their role within policy discussion over child poverty and the promotion of social justice.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

David Lawrence

Examines the history of branded characters in children’s marketing; these go back to the Michelin Man in 1898, and include the Robinson Golly and the Jolly Green Giant…

Abstract

Examines the history of branded characters in children’s marketing; these go back to the Michelin Man in 1898, and include the Robinson Golly and the Jolly Green Giant. Shows how reliance on these characters diminished with television advertising, which allowed animated stories to carry the brand, rather than mere static poster and press characters; some of the characters have now been pensioned off. Outlines three stages of child development related to brand characters, followed by the different form of commercial character usage: licensed product (the character is the brand), brand spokespeople like Tony the Tiger, characters associated with the brand over time (like the Dulux dog), borrowed equity using entertainment characters, and pack design with character visuals. Warns that increased sophistication of children with respect to brands and advertising means that character brands can alienate older children if they are perceived as too childlike.

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Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Mary E. Jackson

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Japan Journal Access Project seeks to expand access to research materials published in…

Abstract

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Japan Journal Access Project seeks to expand access to research materials published in Japan, and to coordinate collection development activities of Japanese‐language material held by North American research libraries. Established in 1994, the focus of the Japan Project has evolved from providing access to scientific and technical serials published in Japan to providing access to Japanese language materials held by Japanese and North American libraries. The Union List of Japanese Serials and Newspapers and the Association of National University Libraries (ANUL) and Waseda document‐delivery projects have emerged as key activities. Collaborative collection development remains an important, but unrealized, goal. Suggestions for future developments are made.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Richard J Bennett

This review is based for the most part on conference proceedings. It begins with a look at recent developments in interlending in Australasia, with a comparison of…

Abstract

This review is based for the most part on conference proceedings. It begins with a look at recent developments in interlending in Australasia, with a comparison of interlending statistics, and papers from a resource‐sharing conference in New Zealand reporting Australian and New Zealand interlending practice. Unresolved attempts to define an interlending plan for Australia are discussed together with the present situation. Two delegates' papers at a conference in Western Australia report contrasting developments there. Turning to the UK, four papers from an interlending conference consider the current UK situation, financial aspects, the end user's view and future development of interlending. Finally, a world‐wide collection of ‘proceedings’ is reviewed, dealing with different interlending systems in the UK, FRG, GDR, USA, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, China and the European Communities' DOCDEL project, with particular reference to Patent information in Germany and the TRANSDOC project in France.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Rachel Cooke

Uses historical data to examine emergent trends in media aimed at children; the intention is to detail the globalised “Bedroom Culture” phenomenon which has been…

Abstract

Uses historical data to examine emergent trends in media aimed at children; the intention is to detail the globalised “Bedroom Culture” phenomenon which has been identified in the UK and USA as signifying a move from outdoors to indoors and from active to passive pursuits. Shows how the growth of the Internet and mobile phone has not led to a reduction in television viewing, but instead to fragmentation and diversification of the children’s media market, aided by the dramatic explosion in satellite and cable TV; children interact with the different media forms in very different ways, each of them contributing to their entertainment requirements, and they can now communicate outside their traditional peer networks. Concludes that new communication channels are merely a way to reach consumers more efficiently; websites and mobile phones require high investment to induce children to use them, and must avoid appearing to be intrusive.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Philip Calvert

Abstract

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Asian Libraries, vol. 7 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1017-6748

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Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Gary Spraakman and Julie Margret

Sir George Simpson, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) from 1821 to his death in 1860, was the subject of numerous biographical works that described various…

Abstract

Purpose

Sir George Simpson, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) from 1821 to his death in 1860, was the subject of numerous biographical works that described various facets of the man including his managerial abilities, literary prowess, physical stamina, abundant energy, extensive art collection and ethnological specimens. Two related aspects of his outstanding management style have been overlooked: the genesis of his management style and where it can be placed in the evolution of management practices during the 19th century.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data from the Hudson's Bay Company archives plus secondary sources.

Findings

Simpson's management abilities came from his grammar school education and his apprenticeship to a counting house. More importantly, it can be attributed to his association with his mentor Andrew Wedderburn, his dedication to the HBC, and his high level of physical and intellectual energy. His information intensive management style was also a significant precursor to systematic management, which occurred later in the 19th century.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine other examples of the evolution of management during the 19th century, particularly the transition from sub‐unit accountability to systematic management.

Originality/value

The paper emphasizes the importance of managers in making management systems work.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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