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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Graham Dickson and Donald J. Philippon

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Lamar Odom, Richard Owen, Amina Valley and Phillip Burrell

This paper aims to explore President Obama's leadership style during passage of this major and controversial piece of legislation. Specifically it addresses the historical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore President Obama's leadership style during passage of this major and controversial piece of legislation. Specifically it addresses the historical development of healthcare reform in the USA, and provides an ethical analysis of President Obama's leadership in pursuing the health reform initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature, speeches, and application of leadership and ethical theory, an analysis was done of President Obama's leadership and ethical approach to healthcare reform.

Findings

This analysis revealed that Obama's behavior was consistent with the full‐range leadership model articulated by Bass and Avolio. Moreover, his personal and strategic ethical approach to promulgating healthcare reform incorporated both deontological and teleological ethical principles.

Originality/value

This paper provides a current look at President Obama's leadership style and demonstrates how incorporating different ethical theories can result in the same outcome.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Nancy Borkowski, Gloria Deckard, Mimi Weber, Laurie A. Padron and Suzanne Luongo

The purpose of this case study was to gather participants' perceptions of the impact of Memorial Healthcare System's Pillars of Leadership Academy's leadership development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study was to gather participants' perceptions of the impact of Memorial Healthcare System's Pillars of Leadership Academy's leadership development programs on an individual, professional and organizational level.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a mixture of in‐person and telephone structured interviews, the researchers collected and analyzed qualitative data to explore the experiences of participants from the leadership development programs.

Findings

The major themes that interviewees mentioned as impacts of their participation in the mentoring programs closely parallel the foundations of transformational leadership. This suggests that the goals of the Pillars of Leadership Academy have been successful in developing leaders, which provides the basis for improved organizational as well as individual performance.

Practical implications

Developing leaders has been identified as one of the most pressing challenges for the future. Memorial Healthcare System (MHS) demonstrates that theory‐ and competency‐based leadership development programs can contribute to the performance and success of individuals as well as health services organizations.

Originality/value

The success of MHS overall and the contributions of the Pillars of Leadership Academy to the organizational culture and leadership provides a best practice that other organizations can follow regarding the implementation of a success leadership development program.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

John Edmonstone

The paper seeks to describe a national strategic and multi‐professional clinical leadership programme designed and developed for the National Health Service in Scotland…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to describe a national strategic and multi‐professional clinical leadership programme designed and developed for the National Health Service in Scotland. It addresses the policy imperatives behind the programme, the local and national processes for identifying future clinical leaders and their preparation through the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The background context and case for the programme are considered against international and local contexts. The programme's roots are explored, drawing upon the extensive consultation process used. The programme design is explained and the evaluation methodology and results are described.

Findings

Key learning related to programme design and delivery issues is highlighted, as is that relating to leadership itself.

Research limitations/implications

This is a one‐country case study but draws upon recent international good practice.

Originality/value

The case study identifies how a small (five million population) country can devise a strategic clinical leadership programme which reflects the distinctive direction adopted at policy level of working closely with clinical leaders.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Meagan Crethar, Jan Phillips and Paula Brown

This paper is a descriptive case study which seeks to outline how leadership development is being utilised across Queensland Health (Queensland Department of Health…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a descriptive case study which seeks to outline how leadership development is being utilised across Queensland Health (Queensland Department of Health, Australia) to achieve improvements in workplace culture and ultimately improvements in clinical care and patient outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Queensland Health has been implementing a comprehensive organisation‐wide suite of leadership development programs since 2006. This includes a range of specific leadership development programs conducted over a period of time for clinical and non‐clinical staff. It also includes specialist leadership development workshops of shorter duration, online leadership modules, web‐based support, executive coaching and 360‐degree feedback. The programs are based upon experiential learning which engages participants in critical thinking and self‐reflection based upon in‐context experiences relevant to themselves. Ongoing leadership program development has been evidence‐based and identified through 360‐degree feedback outcomes, staff opinion survey outcomes and program evaluation outcomes.

Findings

The 360‐degree feedback survey results of participants have improved. This demonstrates that the leadership development programs have impacted positively on participants' workplace behaviour. The culture and climate survey results have improved which demonstrates positive cultural change has taken place. The programs have been evaluated very highly by participants.

Originality/value

This is one of the most comprehensive and innovative leadership development initiatives ever undertaken within the Australian health sector, with over 10,000 participants to date.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Luís Velez Lapão and Gilles Dussault

This paper aims to describe the training strategy developed to provide the leadership of a new coordination structure of health centers in Portugal, with managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the training strategy developed to provide the leadership of a new coordination structure of health centers in Portugal, with managerial competencies adapted to the requirements of their function, in support of primary care reform.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre and post‐program questionnaires were exploited. These focused on the perceptions of the new managers of their needs and of the benefits derived from their participation in learning activities during 2008 and 2009.

Findings

The findings outline that although the program created opportunities for executive directors to identify and analyze planning and management problems and to share potential solutions with colleagues, a training program is not sufficient to create the conditions that facilitate change.

Research limitations/implications

More research is required to better understand the impact of the program on executive directors' attitudes and behaviors. More research on measuring the impact of leadership training is needed to provide policy‐makers with strategies to support their reforms.

Practical implications

The PACES training program was designed to develop and strengthen the managerial capacities of a group of managers of a new administrative structure in the health sector; it could be also applicable to other sectors like education, environment, etc.

Social implications

If a reform process is to be effective, policy‐makers need to address, in addition to building individual capacities, organizational and institutional capacity needs, and design mechanisms to support managers on a continuing basis.

Originality/value

This paper describes the development of a new program focused on management and leadership to fit the needs of a reform in primary‐care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Monique Cikaliuk

This paper aims to examine the benefits and challenges of enacting cross‐sector alliances as a strategy to meet the health leadership capacity and capability requirements…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the benefits and challenges of enacting cross‐sector alliances as a strategy to meet the health leadership capacity and capability requirements to effect improvements in health service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings originate from two case studies of cross‐sector alliances in Canada.

Findings

Value generated by strategic alliances in health with organisations from public, private and civil sectors is accrued at the inter‐organisational, organisational, group and individual level. Obstacles related to mindsets, operations and governance guiding the partnerships were identified which further an understanding of the advantages and constraints for using cross‐sector alliances as a strategy for large‐scale health leadership development.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could investigate whether other factors influence the overall success of using an alliance strategy which may lead to a more comprehensive understanding of large‐scale health leadership initiatives. Given the universal health care context of this study, the results should be examined for their generalisability to other contexts.

Practical implications

The results urge decision‐makers to develop the mental models, behaviours and processes that support the use of cross‐sector alliances to achieve practical benefits gained through large‐systems health leadership development that may otherwise be unattainable.

Originality/value

This paper responds to the needs of executives by investigating alliances among health, education, business and government as a strategic driver for building the health leadership capacity and capability needed for implementing health reform.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Anne Marinelli‐Poole, Allan McGilvray and Diane Lynes

This article aims to provide an overview of what is occurring within two large District Health Boards in New Zealand: Counties Manukau DHB, ranking number three in…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to provide an overview of what is occurring within two large District Health Boards in New Zealand: Counties Manukau DHB, ranking number three in relative population size, and Canterbury DHB, number two. The conclusions provide a comparison of these approaches and draw on some of the new developments which are being driven by and through these District Health Boards.

Design/methodology/approach

Canterbury DHB have embraced a capability/competency framework while Counties Manukau DHB have chosen an alternative approach, enacting “leadership as a practice approach”. CMDHB have developed a range of development intervention across management and leadership levels while CDHB have chosen a path of HR practices aligned to a capability framework.

Findings

The approaches taken by Counties Manukau DHB and Canterbury DHB, while different, are driven by many of the same elements both internally and externally, indeed they might even be considered complementary. A focus on quality and patient safety, the changing dynamics of clinicians and managers, the integration of primary and secondary care and the increasing move to multi‐disciplinary teams who focus on care systems in an environment of increased demand alongside proportionally decreasing resources feature in both and require an adaptation of leadership in a health context.

Originality/value

The approaches taken by the two DHBs are unique to their organisations and the sector, yet provide exemplars of practice for other large health providers. The outcomes will reflect their differences in approach and the specific workforce challenges each faces.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2017

Mikel Larreina and Leire Gartzia

In the last decades, many of the most talented and promising young graduates in the developed economies have joined the financial industry. Simultaneously, ill-designed…

Abstract

In the last decades, many of the most talented and promising young graduates in the developed economies have joined the financial industry. Simultaneously, ill-designed incentives’ schemes have favored the development of a culture in which excessive greed, free-riders’ behavior, unreasonable appetite for risk, and short-term decision making have endangered the economy and, potentially, have laid the foundations for financial, economic, social, and environmental crises.

In this chapter, we review current challenges in the financial industry from the lens of human and social capital. We examine some of the factors that allowed unethical behavior and a short-term financial focus in the financial sector, examining how compensation and an extremely competitive culture became key elements that favored greedy and manipulative behavior and ultimately generated socially harmful human and social capital in the financial sector. Finally, we discuss the emergence of a number of game-changers (namely, Brexit, FinTech, the growing relevance of ethical standards, and the increasing participation of women and millennials in the industry) that might represent potential promotors of change and help restructure and reshape the financial industry.

Details

Human Capital and Assets in the Networked World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-828-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Ali C. Akyol

Abstract

Details

Corporate Fraud Exposed
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-418-8

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