Search results

1 – 10 of 33
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2010

Don E. Kash

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that the importance of culture on the innovation of technological processes and products has not received sufficient attention from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that the importance of culture on the innovation of technological processes and products has not received sufficient attention from researchers. The paper offers a framework and some categories for investigating the affects of culture on technological innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data and ideas that inform this paper come primarily from interviews carried out as a part of case studies of the innovation of 13 technology products and processes centered in China and other five countries.

Findings

Innovation success in the various technology sectors differs among countries including China in part because of different national cultures – the norms and values that guide and constrain both the individuals in societies and the societies at large.

Research limitations/implications

The values the paper assigns to eight cultural characteristics for China and other five countries are based on qualitative interviews and more scientific survey is needed.

Practical implications

Increased understanding of how different national cultures influence innovation will give managers and policy makers improved opportunities to formulate policies and management practices that can overcome cultural barriers and take advantage of cultural assets.

Originality/value

The paper offers a starting point for the investigation of the impact of national cultures on technological innovation in different technology sectors.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy in China, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-552X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Abstract

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy in China, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-552X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Latisha Reynolds, Amber Willenborg, Samantha McClellan, Rosalinda Hernandez Linares and Elizabeth Alison Sterner

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2016.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

C.E. Siemieniuch and M.A. Sinclair

The aim of this paper is to introduce the CLEVER process framework for knowledge lifecycle management (KLM), which was developed to help organisations in the manufacturing…

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to introduce the CLEVER process framework for knowledge lifecycle management (KLM), which was developed to help organisations in the manufacturing and construction domains tackle ill‐defined knowledge management problems. Focussing on organisational and cultural issues, rather than technological ones, the framework aids the user organisation to translate vague KLM problems into a set of specific knowledge management issues, to identify preferred solutions for these, and then to identify the appropriate KLM processes to achieve these solutions. In this respect, the paper is an extension of the work of Boisot, and Davenport and Prusak although the origins are different. The paper begins with the background and aims of the project on which this research is based and moves on to a discussion on the importance of knowledge management and its relevance to the CLEVER framework. An overview of the framework, describing its four‐stage structure is provided which details examples of how to apply each of the separate stages. The final section summarises the limits of the tool and proposes new areas where further research is required.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

A.J.M. Farooque

Outlines the evolution of the idea of private property in the West and in early Islamic states; and its practical translation into property rights in land in the UK…

Abstract

Outlines the evolution of the idea of private property in the West and in early Islamic states; and its practical translation into property rights in land in the UK, Islamic territories and South Asia. Provides a glossary of terms which may be unfamiliar to Western readers and argues that the East India Company’s Permanent Settlement Regulation in South Asia recognized existing rights and did not create new ones. Believes that understanding this is important for any evolutionary theory of the South Asian economy.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Daniel M. Walker, Timothy R. Huerta and Mark L. Diana

Policy makers and practitioners argue that electronic exchange of clinical data across the healthcare system is a key component of improving health service delivery in the…

Abstract

Policy makers and practitioners argue that electronic exchange of clinical data across the healthcare system is a key component of improving health service delivery in the United States. Provider administrators, however, question the strategic value of participation in health information exchanges (HIEs) and remain reluctant to participate. Existing research fails to adequately illuminate the potential value derived from HIEs by participating organizations. This paper addresses this gap by developing a conceptual model informed by the complementary theoretical perspectives of the relational view and systems theory to specify both a provider organizationʼs internal conditions and the HIE structure necessary for both financial accrual and quality improvement. This two-sided model can assist policymakers as they attempt to encourage HIE development, as well as provider and HIE leadership that seek to benefit from HIEs. The propositions developed from this model can also help guide researchers as they evaluate the impact of HIEs.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

John James Cater III and Brent Beal

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of family business owners in an externally induced crisis from a resource-based perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of family business owners in an externally induced crisis from a resource-based perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a qualitative case study approach involving 22 firms.

Findings

In the aftermath of the BP oil spill, a series of ripple effects impacted family firms both negatively and positively. The paper outlines five ways that family firms may improve company performance in crisis situations.

Research limitations/implications

Although our study is rich in qualitative detail, it is important to recognize that the BP oil spill represents a unique crisis context and caution should be exercised in generalizing the study's findings.

Practical implications

While ripple effects may be powerful at the industry and industry sub-group level, the paper provides evidence that family firms may overcome these external effects using one or more of five strategic initiatives: strong networking relationships, idiosyncratic local knowledge, flexibility, rapid response, and exercising trust with caution.

Originality/value

The study validates the potential utility of a ripple effect model in the study of family businesses and externally induced crises. It has the potential to contribute to improving management response.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Pete Sayers

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

C.E. Siemieniuch and M.A. Sinclair

This paper outlines the issues to be addressed in preparing organisations for the introduction of knowledge lifecycle management (KLM) processes. If one views…

Abstract

This paper outlines the issues to be addressed in preparing organisations for the introduction of knowledge lifecycle management (KLM) processes. If one views organisations as “knowledge engines” providing value to customers, then processes for KLM are fundamental for the organisation's survival. However, as with all capability, the organisation must be prepared for its introduction if it is to make profitable use of this new capability. The article starts with section 1 (introduction and outline of the project undertaken) and 2 (the importance of KLM) setting the scene for section 3 (preparing the organisation for KLM). This section outlines both strategic and tactical issues to be addressed – a devolved structure, IT‐based tools, an open communications infrastructure, “best practice” business processes, metrication, knowledge capture, and a culture of trust – and outlines some processes necessary to establish the organisational context for KLM. Sections 4 and 5 bring the paper to a close, with some general conclusions and acknowledgements.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33