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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Jérôme Witter, Don Clausing, Ludger Laufenberg and Ronaldo Soares de Andrade

Market presence, quality and costs are primarily decided duringproduct development – improved in the last 15 years by theimplementation of basic concurrent engineering and…

Abstract

Market presence, quality and costs are primarily decided during product development – improved in the last 15 years by the implementation of basic concurrent engineering and now further extended by enhanced quality function deployment (EQFD). Another key improvement is extended reusability, which enables greater product variety, while staying higher on learning curves. Reusability is best planned and managed by using a reusability matrix which is responsive to the voices of the customers and fully integrated into the total development process. Outlines the integration of the reusability planning and the required interface management into EQFD, and thus the integration into total quality development.

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World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Helen Mill

Quality functional deployment (QFD) can be a powerful technique ifappropriately applied. However, it can generate a great deal ofpaperwork and sometimes the benefits are…

Abstract

Quality functional deployment (QFD) can be a powerful technique if appropriately applied. However, it can generate a great deal of paperwork and sometimes the benefits are disappointing. Presents a number of analysis tools which should be used in conjunction with QFD. These tools provide enhancements which help to understand the nature of the product and demonstrate how to use QFD more effectively.

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World Class Design to Manufacture, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-3074

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Elisa Marson and Marco Sartor

Quality function deployment (QFD) is a method developed in Japan to help transform the voice of the customer into product characteristics and to control quality in the…

Abstract

Quality function deployment (QFD) is a method developed in Japan to help transform the voice of the customer into product characteristics and to control quality in the development/production phases. It minimizes the risk that products or services are far from the costumers’ needs and promotes company integration and quality management. Starting with the description of the “House of Quality,” the chapter explains how to build a QFD. Strengths and weaknesses of the methodology are also presented to the reader.

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Quality Management: Tools, Methods, and Standards
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-804-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

John J. Kao

This article has been adapted from John Kao's outstanding keynote presentation at the 1997 International Strategic Leadership Conference. The conference, which was held in…

Abstract

This article has been adapted from John Kao's outstanding keynote presentation at the 1997 International Strategic Leadership Conference. The conference, which was held in Washington, D.C., from April 27 to April 30, was attended by approximately 900 professionals from 25 countries around the world.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Andrew Lee‐Mortimer

Reports on the International Conference on “Design forCompetitive Advantage – Making the Most of Design”,organized by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Advises that…

Abstract

Reports on the International Conference on “Design for Competitive Advantage – Making the Most of Design”, organized by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Advises that UK companies need to design and sell more products worldwide in order to reverse the UK′s economic trend. Details talks from the conference given by speakers from large manufacturing organizations. Stresses the importance of the customer; assessing customer needs; providing suitable products; listening to the customer′s voice and designing products which fulfil those expressed needs; supporting products through the life cycle; adopting a world class approach; reducing lead times and being creative; and how to avoid pirfalls and learn lessons.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Yoji Akao and Glenn H. Mazur

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has been practiced by leading companies around the world since 1966. Its two‐fold purpose is to assure that true customer needs are…

Abstract

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has been practiced by leading companies around the world since 1966. Its two‐fold purpose is to assure that true customer needs are properly deployed throughout the design, build and delivery of a new product, whether it be assembled, processed, serviced, or even software, and to improve the product development process itself. This paper describes the evolution of the method, its current best practice, and proposals for future direction, not only to log its history and key players correctly, but also to convey the richness and depth of the applications throughout multiple industries.

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International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2007

Jean‐Baptiste Fouquet

Many practitioners strive to increase the efficiency of their product development. In addition, smaller companies must satisfy customers’ expectations of their product…

Abstract

Many practitioners strive to increase the efficiency of their product development. In addition, smaller companies must satisfy customers’ expectations of their product development. These expectations can be e.g. use of specific methodologies such as Lean Product Development (LPD) and/or Design for Six Sigma (DFSS). This study attempts to identify differences and similarities between these methodologies and the connection between them. This comparison is of interest to practitioners that must choose a strategy for their product development as well as to researchers. The aim of both methodologies is to reduce waste and time of development and to raise the quality of a product at the very roots of the product: its development. LPD and DFSS help development managers to structure projects and focus as much as possible on customer expectations and satisfaction.

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Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Couchen Wu and Shwu‐Ing Wu

Explores ways of developing the marketing mix for the market in drinking tea, rejecting a number of existing marketing mix models. Adapts methods popular in product design…

Abstract

Explores ways of developing the marketing mix for the market in drinking tea, rejecting a number of existing marketing mix models. Adapts methods popular in product design and applies them to the marketing mix of the tea‐drinking market. Uses Suh’s principle of product design, explaining it in detail, then applies this to drinking tea, using a random sampling survey to discover consumer needs, perceptions and attitudes. Reports also on an empirical study of 799 Taiwanese households to find out more about the Oriental tea market. Presents the data analysis, including a comparison of brand loyalty. Indicates that market segmentation and marketing mix should be developed simultaneously and claims that this paper provides a method for doing that.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2008

Kanghwa Choi and Soo W. Kim

This paper describes a comprehensive approach to examine how technological innovation contributes to the renewal of a firm’s competences through its dynamic and reciprocal…

Abstract

This paper describes a comprehensive approach to examine how technological innovation contributes to the renewal of a firm’s competences through its dynamic and reciprocal relationship with R&D and product commercialization. Three theories of technology and innovation (the R&D and technological knowledge concept, product‐process concept, technological interdependence concept) are used to relate technology and innovation to strategic management. Based on these theories, this paper attempts to identify the dynamic relationship between product innovation and process innovation using system dynamics by investigating that aspect of the dynamic changes in the closed feedback circulation structure in which R&D investments drive the accumulation of technological knowledge.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Charles Fruehling Springwood

Frieda brought her four graham crackers on a saucer and some milk in a blue-and-white Shirley Temple cup. She was a long time with the milk, and gazed fondly at the…

Abstract

Frieda brought her four graham crackers on a saucer and some milk in a blue-and-white Shirley Temple cup. She was a long time with the milk, and gazed fondly at the silhouette of Shirley Temple's dimpled face. Frieda and she had a loving conversation about how cu-ute Shirley Temple was. I couldn't join them in their adoration because I hated Shirley. Not because she was cute, but because she danced with Bojangles, was myfriend, myuncle, mydaddy, and who ought to have been soft-shoeing and chuckling with me. Instead he was enjoying, sharing, giving a lovely dance thing with one of those little white girls whose socks never slid down under their heals. So I said, “I like Jane Withers.” (Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye, 2000 p. 19)

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-785-7

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