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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Hong Seng Woo, Doirean Wilson and Jonathan Liu

Utilises findings that relate to Chinese negotiation skills that can be used primarily as a guide for female Western negotiators wishing to do business with the Chinese…

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Abstract

Utilises findings that relate to Chinese negotiation skills that can be used primarily as a guide for female Western negotiators wishing to do business with the Chinese. Evidence comes from observations and group discussions conducted with 31 female Chinese managers. Results show that there is a lot to consider when negotiating with the Chinese. The eight key characteristics which form an endemic part of Chinese culture are face, trust, friendship, ambiguity, patience, Guanxi networks, status, and Chinese protocols. Examines the gender impact of these characteristics on the negotiation process and assesses the ensuing implications for Western negotiators. Evidence suggests that first six characteristics are gender neutral while the latter two are gender biased. The women enrolled on the management programmes provided a “birds‐eye‐view” into the interactive behaviour and social upbringing of Chinese women, thus giving an insight into Chinese culture and customs. However, it is imperative to acknowledge that being a successful Chinese negotiator requires an “open minded” approach and heightened awareness of cultural differences.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Jonathan Liu and Doirean Wilson

Aims to disseminate the findings of an investigation into the perception of women as managers and the obstacles that they face in the workplace. Identifies the issues and…

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3574

Abstract

Aims to disseminate the findings of an investigation into the perception of women as managers and the obstacles that they face in the workplace. Identifies the issues and problems faced by women from “multinational corporations” and the impact of operating across national boundaries. The three key issues are age, gender, and family responsibility. Reports on evidence found from conducting “personal interviews” and “focus group” discussions, showing that the ensuing implications have had a significant impact on women in the workplace. Argues that little has changed in terms of employers’ perception of working women so far. The study was supported from funds provided via the European Union under the European Social Fund Scheme.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Jonathan Liu and Doirean Wilson

Discusses the findings of a recent study into the development of women managers, in the field of information technology (IT). Addresses the key question as to why few…

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1573

Abstract

Discusses the findings of a recent study into the development of women managers, in the field of information technology (IT). Addresses the key question as to why few women are entering IT. Provides an insight into the perception of women working in IT, and their role in this “fast‐growing” technological area. Identifies four obstacles – gender stereotypes and attitudes, family responsibility, working time constraints, and lack of confidence – that have had a restrictive impact on the careers of female managers employed in this field. Albeit each of these obstacles has an overlap of common characteristics, it was decided that it would be better to explore each in individual context for the purpose of clarity. Also evaluates evidence taken from “personal interviews” carried out with 46 female delegates enrolled on a specialised IT training course, and 17 female managers from various companies. Uses structured questionnaire to elicit and record this data.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Doirean Wilson, Yehuda Baruch, Patti Boulaye and Mary Hartog

Highlights the need to be mindful of the global implications of migration and the ecology of diversity in our economy and organizations. Argues that support and programs…

Abstract

Purpose

Highlights the need to be mindful of the global implications of migration and the ecology of diversity in our economy and organizations. Argues that support and programs for diversity are essential to a sustainable economy and the life chances of all our citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

Explores diversity from a theoretical perspective and then provides details of one person’s struggle to gain acceptance in an alien culture.

Findings

Draws attention to the complexities and complications born of globalization and the challenge these pose for multi-national organizations. Advances the view that these complexities also relate to the émigrés who bought with them their different ways of thinking, behaving and speaking that were alien to the indigenous community, and for many still remain an enigma.

Practical implications

Highlights the need to develop an organization and leadership culture where every manager is an HR manager, assuming shared responsibility for promoting and developing diversity in the organization.

Social implications

Shows how difficult can be the struggle to gain acceptance for a person newly arriving in a foreign country.

Originality/value

Combines an academic view of immigration and diversity with one person’s experiences.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Chandana Sanyal, Doirean Wilson, Charlotte Sweeney, Jude Smith Rachele, Satwant Kaur and Christine Yates

– Highlights some of the things that can be done to ensure that organizations embed diversity and inclusion.

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2696

Abstract

Purpose

Highlights some of the things that can be done to ensure that organizations embed diversity and inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Considers the need for effective engagement, the importance of performance indicators for diversity and inclusion and the key role of sharing stories. Discusses, too, how critical race theory could help to bring about improvements.

Findings

Advances the view that a transformational process that supports employees with the knowledge and sustainable skills needed to improve business performance via ethical means will form a significant part of future-proofing organizations.

Practical implications

Argues that, to achieve this organizations have to drive home the message that diversity and inclusion are everyone’s business.

Social implications

Advances the view that a unified approach to diversity and inclusion, which is embedded in the business ethics of the organization, can have a sustainable positive impact on the health and well-being of individuals, business and society.

Originality/value

Considers diversity and inclusion from diverse perspectives and draws conclusions that can help organizations to perform better in these areas.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Mary Hartog, Julie Haddock-Millar, Chris Rigby and Doirean Wilson

– Points up the importance of developing people in organizations to enhance diversity.

Abstract

Purpose

Points up the importance of developing people in organizations to enhance diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on two presentations to a conference on diversity at Middlesex University, London.

Findings

Highlights the role mentoring can play, first to achieve access to graduate-employment opportunities in the public sector and secondly to enable people to work together effectively and harmoniously in teams with greater respect through awareness and appreciation of difference.

Practical implications

Describes the public-sector diversity-mentoring scheme, the primary goal was to widen the pool of applicants to graduate-employment opportunities in the sector from ethnic minorities and working-class backgrounds.

Social implications

Explains that, while respect is a common value shared by all, in one culture it may be experienced differently from in another and for teams to work harmoniously all members need to feel respected.

Originality/value

Shows how diversity is the key to better relationships and the flourishing of human potential.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Doirean Wilson

– Interviews two black minority ethnic (BME) male youths who were raised in high knife and gun-crime areas of London.

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461

Abstract

Purpose

Interviews two black minority ethnic (BME) male youths who were raised in high knife and gun-crime areas of London.

Design/methodology/approach

Considers whether feral youth behavior might have something to do with British youths’ need for respect.

Findings

Quotes one of the youths as saying it is disrespectful to enter their territory without permission.

Practical implications

Quotes the other as saying that BME male youths do not get respect from the British police, the politicians or the society and so do not have a voice.

Social implications

Considers that society might therefore benefit from changing its attitude to BME youth.

Originality/value

Contains the views of two BME young people who were prepared to be named in an interview that would provide them with the opportunity to air their views without criticism.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Jonathan Liu and Doirean Wilson

Presents the findings of a survey by means of structured questionnaire, interviews and discussions with students on the Returners into Enterprise programme at Middlesex…

Abstract

Presents the findings of a survey by means of structured questionnaire, interviews and discussions with students on the Returners into Enterprise programme at Middlesex University. Attempts to discover the key issues relevant to women at work, particularly in management. Considers areas such as pay, gender disparity, age and family responsibilities before considering ways to over come these obstacles.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Yehuda Baruch, Anne Laure Humbert and Doirean Wilson

Moving from a focus on a single aspect of diversity to multiple-diversity characteristics, the purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a model that…

Abstract

Purpose

Moving from a focus on a single aspect of diversity to multiple-diversity characteristics, the purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test a model that examines whether self-efficacy (SE) and protean career (PC) measures relate to intention to stay (ITS), as a possible mediation of job satisfaction (JS). The authors then explored whether perceived discrimination – on single and multiple grounds – modify these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 316 US managers, of which 95 reported perceived discrimination: 51 perceived discrimination on a single ground and a further 44 on multiple grounds.

Findings

SE and PC are associated with increased ITS where there is higher JS. Furthermore, multiple discrimination results in more negative outcomes compared to a single source of perceived discrimination.

Research limitations/implications

Employees with multiple diversities might be more prone to feelings of discrimination, which in an organizational context that lacks diversity awareness can generate negative implications on performance, esteem, working relationships, and ultimately ITS.

Originality/value

The research provides valuable insights into the issue of diversity and discrimination relating to more than one single source of diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2017

Doirean Wilson

Affluence and material goods of varying types are portents of a millennium age consumer culture that encourages the masses to voluntarily participate in the need to buy…

Abstract

Affluence and material goods of varying types are portents of a millennium age consumer culture that encourages the masses to voluntarily participate in the need to buy, buy and buy! This trend to spend creates a purchasing fervour that preoccupies many consumers with the ongoing yearning to shop until they drop. Clever marketing tactics such as enticing smells, catchy jingles, prize-draw entries, lucrative sales, discounts and the recruitment of celebrities to advertise a range of different wares are just some of the ploys adopted by vendors and retailers to maintain the sustainability of this cycle of consumer spending. This scenario promotes what could be perceived as a never-ending desire to procure yet more products and merchandise, which can create social dilemmas such as personal debt due to, for example, impulse buying, excessive spending and unnecessary borrowing.

Retailers and manufacturers are driven by a quest to sell so constantly tout their goods to tempt consumers including those with a need for personal and social respect, to take the bait in order to encourage them to keep buying. This, coupled with the rapid advances in technology over recent decades, has made it easier for consumers to shop, order, obtain and pay for their goods from the comfort of an armchair or via handheld devices, and all at a tap of a button. In essence, technology has added to, or even exacerbated, the materialistic consumer trend as witnessed across many global societies today – from the east and the west to the north and the south. But what impact does consumerism have on the well-being of humankind and, in turn, the environment? This chapter adopts a comparative approach to answer this question by exploring the implications of consumerism as a means for broadening the topic’s framework and to contribute to debates regarding consumerism, well-being, social dilemma, sustainability and techno-economics.

Details

Integral Ecology and Sustainable Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-463-7

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