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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Divya Sharma, Agam Gupta, Arqum Mateen and Sankalp Pratap

Google commands approximately 70 per cent of search market share worldwide, resulting in businesses investing heavily in search engine advertising on Google to target…

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Abstract

Purpose

Google commands approximately 70 per cent of search market share worldwide, resulting in businesses investing heavily in search engine advertising on Google to target potential customers. Recently, Google changed the way in which content and ads were displayed on the search engine results page. This reshuffling of content and ads is expected to affect the advertisers who advertise on Google and/or use it to drive traffic to their websites. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of these changes on various stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data have been collected from various sources on the internet including blogs and discussion forums. Netnography has been used as it allows a detailed evaluation of the consumers’ needs, wants and choices in a virtual space.

Findings

The average cost-per-click for ads on the top positions is expected to increase. Advertisers whose ads usually occupy the lower positions would be adversely affected. To counter this, more emphasis should be placed on ad extensions and on product listing ads. In addition, organizations would benefit from increased efforts on search engine optimization.

Practical implications

A variety of coping strategies have been developed that can help marketers to successfully navigate through the change, including the use of ad extensions and the use of product listing ads.

Originality/value

This practice-focused paper offers guidelines for digital marketers to use sponsored search more effectively as part of their arsenal in light of some important changes recently made by Google. The potential of netnography as a research methodology has also been expanded by using it in a novel setting and in drawing up actionable insights.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Amit Jain and Divya Sharma

This research aims to study the coping experience of visually impaired (VI) bankers in India after they have received reasonable accommodation from their employers, that…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to study the coping experience of visually impaired (VI) bankers in India after they have received reasonable accommodation from their employers, that is, the work process or environment has been suitably modified to ensure a barrier-free environment for them.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 12 VI bankers working with public sector banks in India. A phenomenological approach was adopted during data analysis.

Findings

Despite the provision of reasonable accommodations, VI employees often find it difficult to fulfill their job responsibilities. This is on account of extensive paperwork required for completion of their jobs and the partially accessible information systems available to them. As a result, these VI employees are found resorting to workarounds to carry out their jobs, with the nature of workarounds adopted varying with the type and extent of visual impairment. Furthermore, it is observed that VI employees require social support not only from their superiors and peers but also from their subordinates and customers to carry out their tasks.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection was done through snowball sampling which could have resulted in sampling bias. Due to confidentiality issues, observation of workarounds in practice by VI employees could not be carried out as part of the study.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature on integration of persons with disabilities (PwDs) by examining their coping experience after provision of reasonable accommodations. It emphasizes the role of workarounds, an under-studied area in PwD integration, as well as support of other stakeholders in the experience.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Divya Sharma

Educational institutions have long been considered a prerogative of charity with an aim to illuminate the human being with the light of knowledge and a social…

Abstract

Educational institutions have long been considered a prerogative of charity with an aim to illuminate the human being with the light of knowledge and a social responsibility for working toward developing a better society. In this era of social responsibility, contribution of educational institutions, beyond transaction, appears to be ignored. This chapter proposes an “Integrated Model for Educational Social Responsibility” and highlights need of giving due recognition to an important section of curriculum in education – The Community Work, named variously as co-curricular activity, extension work, volunteer work, social activity, etc. The chapter has presented a vision for comprehensively uniting the varied social charity efforts that are being put up by various entities in doing the similar kind of work.

The chapter discusses historical perspective on social responsibility, concept of corporate social responsibility and educational social responsibility (ESR), importance of ESR, need for corporate educational social responsibility (CESR), planning and strategizing CESR, process for developing CESR, areas of integration for CESR, approaches for integrating socially responsible curriculum, embedded model for ESR and finally the challenges of integration. The CESR model if envisioned in the right manner can go a long way in not only building a sustainable society but also in developing socially responsible people. There is a need of comprehensive efforts on the same footing where the organizations need to work in parallel rather than opposite to each other.

Details

International Perspectives on Policies, Practices & Pedagogies for Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-854-3

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Divya Sharma

Curriculum designers have a colossal role to perform. They behold responsibility of viewing futuristic needs not only of society but also of the planet as a whole. They…

Abstract

Curriculum designers have a colossal role to perform. They behold responsibility of viewing futuristic needs not only of society but also of the planet as a whole. They have taken into consideration not only intangible needs of society but also cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of individual learners. Curriculum as a whole tends to stress more on the cognitive development of the child more, whereas the, “affective learning …is included infrequently in curriculum” (Sowell, 2005, p.74); thus at times affective and psychomotor domains are overlooked during curriculum transaction. Emotional development is important for the development of humane society. Combs (1982) notes that when we ignore emotional components of any subject we teach, we actually deprive students of meaningfulness. So there is a need to give importance to the development of values among the students. As microcosms of society school curriculum can play an important role in developing a humane society. This purpose can be realized to some extent by modifying the school curriculum in such a manner that values and skills that are expected for imbibing humane culture are integrated along with the content of the regular school curriculum. The process of designing school curriculum so as to integrate the sustainable development goals may include defining learning outcomes, identifying plug points for integration, ascertaining strategies for integration at cognitive, affective and psychomotor domain, devising curriculum transaction plan, implementing integrated curriculum, evaluating, reviewing and monitoring learning outcomes, and implementing process. It is possible to develop a climate of encouraging and safeguarding cultural heritage by developing resources to educate people. Cultural heritage and traditional knowledge can be safeguarded by supporting practitioners and transmission of skills and knowledge. Plugins can be provided in secondary education at various levels of languages, mathematics and sciences to integrate the curriculum. This text provides comprehensive process and strategies to equip curriculum designers and educators as they guide a whole generation to a bright, safe and beautiful future.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Abstract

Details

International Perspectives on Policies, Practices & Pedagogies for Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-854-3

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Humanizing Higher Education through Innovative Approaches for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-861-1

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Shweta Dahiya, Anupama Panghal, Shilpa Sindhu and Parveen Siwach

Organic food is getting attention these days from consumers and producers, in pursuit of safe and chemical-free food. In India, there is an upsurge in entrepreneurs in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Organic food is getting attention these days from consumers and producers, in pursuit of safe and chemical-free food. In India, there is an upsurge in entrepreneurs in the organic food sector, with women entrepreneurs signalling higher numbers. Women entrepreneurs have the potential to contribute significantly to the field of organic food; the only requirement is to address the challenges faced by them. This paper aims to attempt at exploring and modelling the challenges faced by women entrepreneurs in the organic food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Significant challenges were identified through literature review, primary data collection and expert opinions. The identified challenges were then modelled through total interpretive structural modelling and fuzzy-matriced impact cruises multiplication applique techniques to give a meaningful contextual relationship.

Findings

This study identified “poor government support” and “less awareness” amongst the stakeholders, as the most strategic challenges with the highest driving power to influence other challenges. In contrast, “low funding options” and “fewer buyers” emerged as the most dependent challenges for organic food women entrepreneurs in India.

Originality/value

The model proposed in the study gives a roadmap for different stakeholders in the food industry to scale up organic food women entrepreneurs in India.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Abstract

Details

International Perspectives on Policies, Practices & Pedagogies for Promoting Social Responsibility in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-854-3

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Abstract

Details

Humanizing Higher Education through Innovative Approaches for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-861-1

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Enakshi Sengupta, Patrick Blessinger and Mandla S. Makhanya

With the turn of the century, the Earth's natural resources continue to be stretched as nonrenewable resources continue to dwindle and as the population continues to grow…

Abstract

With the turn of the century, the Earth's natural resources continue to be stretched as nonrenewable resources continue to dwindle and as the population continues to grow. Academia is no exception with human and teaching resources remaining a constraint for all universities including financial resources. Higher education (HE) leadership struggles to contain costs by reducing unnecessary expenditures while trying to ensure that quality remains a top priority. Innovative pedagogy is one way that institutions can help bridge both scarcity and quality and address the growing demand for quality education. New technologies, designing of new curriculum which is relevant and can address the realities of economic demands, have become a high priority in HE. Educators, policymakers and stakeholders have to embrace this transformational change for the progress of their institution. This book addresses such innovative changes that are being initiated by academics around the world. The focus of this book remains on innovative pedagogy, success stories of such interventions, impact on students while reinventing the learner-centered approach and its implication on the future. The authors of this book address the successes and the challenges they have faced.

Details

Humanizing Higher Education through Innovative Approaches for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-861-1

Keywords

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