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Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

David Starr-Glass

Distance learning has proliferated significantly in the last 20 years. This chapter considers some of the issues and implications when teaching and learning moves from an…

Abstract

Distance learning has proliferated significantly in the last 20 years. This chapter considers some of the issues and implications when teaching and learning moves from an in-person to a distance mode. It begins with a brief history of distance learning, considering both the technologies used and the dominant pedagogical approaches employed. This is followed by a survey of the impact of Michael Moore's theory of transactional distance, which considered the consequences of separating the learner from peers and instructor. Contemporary work on Moore's contribution includes transaction and participation, activity theory, and transactional presence. A second major aspect of distance learning has been the attempt to introduce social presence into learning environments. The history of social presence is explored, as are its levels and consequences for the learner. Contemporary aspects of social presence reviewed include communities of inquiry. While Web 2.0 has spectacularly resulted in connectivity, it remains unclear as to whether this automatically resulted in more strongly connected learners. Connectivist approaches are considered and distinctions made between technological connectivity and pedagogical engagement. It is argued that the full and exciting potential of Web 2.0 in distance learning requires a commitment to the distanced learner, balancing learner autonomy and teacher presence, promoting meaningful social engagement, and meeting the specific needs of the distance learner.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Sue Law

Examines an increasingly important feature of further and higher education provision: the development of distancelearning opportunities for managers and teachers…

Abstract

Examines an increasingly important feature of further and higher education provision: the development of distancelearning opportunities for managers and teachers interested in education management qualifications in the context of a newly marketized education service in England and Wales. Draws on a university survey of prospective distancelearning “clients” who had expressed an interest in postgraduate education management courses ‐ now a major growth area ‐ and analyses their stated needs and concerns. Considers, also, the impact of the developing education market on the professional demand for distance learning, and examines how far quality provision and academic excellence can be delivered and maintained by institutions as the new “value for money” imperative, increasingly driving the “professional development business”, becomes further established in further and higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Lauren Eutsler, Pavlo D. Antonenko and Chrystine Mitchell

Immediately following the declaration of the national emergency of the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA, the purpose of this study was to examine one month of social media…

Abstract

Purpose

Immediately following the declaration of the national emergency of the COVID-19 pandemic in the USA, the purpose of this study was to examine one month of social media, news media, school district websites’ continuity plans and educational affiliate organizations, to unveil K-12 stakeholders’ initial response to K-12 remote teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Framed by connectivism theory, the authors used a mixed-methods sequential explanatory design to conduct a systematic content analysis of 43,870 tweets, news media, school district websites’ continuity plans and educational affiliate organizations.

Findings

Initial responses focused on community lockdown procedures, sustaining education, adapting to a remote lifestyle and political tension. The authors revisited included tweets one week later to measure their connectedness, which revealed that educational organizations, which have the largest number of followers, also have the greatest outreach and visibility.

Practical implications

Based on the collective decision-making of education stakeholders, the authors provide three remote teaching recommendations and pedagogical implications for sustainable remote teaching practices.

Originality/value

The authors construct a blueprint from some of the largest school districts, and consequently the COVID-19 hotspots, to broadly examine emergency preparedness and remote instruction plans.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

David Starr-Glass

The purpose of this reflection on practice is to consider and attempt made by the present author to re-imagine online distance learning (ODL) environments to provide a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this reflection on practice is to consider and attempt made by the present author to re-imagine online distance learning (ODL) environments to provide a greater opportunity for learner engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

ODL environments were augmented by video-conferencing to increase dialogue, instructor presence and a sense of instructor care, concern and guidance. The video-conference component was limited time-wise (40 min per weekly module) and aimed at explaining and integrating learning content and activities. The resulting courses were thus augmented and enhanced and not transformed into blended learning courses.

Findings

Preliminary feedback from video-conference discussions and learner reflective journals indicates that the innovation was well received by students and contributed significantly to their appreciation, satisfaction and overall engagement.

Practical implications

The augmentation is simple and effective. It may be an approach that is particularly relevant in designing and facilitating ODL environments in an era of uncertainty, disruption and far-reaching educational changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Social implications

The author argues that the introduction of an active learning component has significant implications for learner performance, satisfaction and persistence with distance learning programs.

Originality/value

Attempts to increase social presence and engagement are not uncommon in ODL. This particular approach is simple, easily enacted and has a perceived element of originality and innovation that appeals to learners. It is argued that it contributes significant value to the quality and outcomes of the distance learning experience.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Thomas R. Kochtanek and Karen K. Hein

The introduction of Web‐based course instruction into an existing degree programme offers the opportunity to re‐examine models supporting learning and the transfer of…

Abstract

The introduction of Web‐based course instruction into an existing degree programme offers the opportunity to re‐examine models supporting learning and the transfer of knowledge among students enrolled in such courses. By removing the barriers of time and place, instructors can create and sustain student learning communities supported by interactive communication tools grounded in asynchronous learning models. The instructor’s role moves to that of a facilitator who seeks to stimulate interactions between students and between students and the instructor, in the pursuit of improved learning and knowledge base construction.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Jyotsna Gupta, Shivendra Singh, Ramesh Pandita and Suneel Kumar Bhat

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The scope of the study is limited to India, reflecting the trend of distance education in LIS in India. The study is based on the secondary data collected by the Ministry of Human Resource and Development, Government of India (GOI) under All India Survey on Higher Education (AISHE). It is to mention that Ministry of Human Resource and Development, GOI, is regularly collecting data from higher education institutions all across the country under AISHE project. The data in the study have been analysed for the period 2011 to 2018.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that, of the total enrolments made in LIS education in India during the period 2011 to 2018, nearly one-fourth of students were enrolled through regular mode and three-fourth were enrolled through distance mode, signifying distance mode of education as the largest medium of LIS education in India. The enrolment figures through distance mode showed slight inconsistency with the result, a negative (−0.49%) average annual corresponding growth was recorded in the enrolment of LIS students through distance mode. Of the total students enrolled in different LIS programmes through distance mode during the period of study, the majority (67.78%) of students were enrolled in the Under Graduate programme (B.Lib.I.Sc.). Similarly, of the total students enrolled in LIS through distance mode during the period of study, 51.36% were female students and 48.63% male students. In terms of caste category, of the total students enrolled during the period of study, 10.12% belonged to the Scheduled Caste category, 4.7% to Scheduled Tribes category, 28.77% Other Backward Class and 56.08% to others, which include general category students as well.

Research limitations/implications

Learning through distance education is a welcome step as long as the idea is to improve the society and to reach out to those who hitherto remained unreached. Sustainable means of enrolment and employability has to be the order of the day, mostly based on demand and supply principle.

Originality/value

This study is original and first of its kind covering enrolment of the students in LIS courses.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Albert A. Vicere

Based on an ongoing series of research initiatives, this article profiles eight major trends in executive education and leadership development: the emergence of an…

Abstract

Based on an ongoing series of research initiatives, this article profiles eight major trends in executive education and leadership development: the emergence of an increasingly competitive marketplace for providers of executive education and leadership development; a growing focus on customized programs; a trend toward shorter, large‐scale, cascaded programs involving staff throughout the organization; a continued trend toward increased use of action learning; a perception that technology and distance delivery will play a more critical role in the future; a significant shift toward experience‐based methodologies like job rotation, task force assignments, action learning and coaching/mentoring; an increased level of importance attached to performance feedback in the development process; and a shift in perspectives toward leadership competencies for the future, with flexibility and adaptability heading the list of critical developmental needs.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

A.S. Guha and Subhashish Maji

The purpose of this paper is an attempt to validate the universal impact of e‐learning as distance education methodology and community learning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is an attempt to validate the universal impact of e‐learning as distance education methodology and community learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines an ontological framework for e‐learning within theoretical referential points, its reach and its systemic and disciplinary approaches. The paper explores the ramifications of e‐learning.

Findings

E‐learning offers distance learning through the internet, giving students an interactive educational experience and the opportunity to study through accredited learning providers. Through e‐learning, companies can deliver distance training to their staff, or gain additional revenue through re‐selling of training programmes. Using e‐learning, colleges of distance education can deliver distance learning to students, or offer other educational establishments the opportunity to use their courses.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that e‐learning makes a definitive impact on the young and old alike, creative writers and the community as a whole. E‐learning groups and communities such as the telecentre movement reach towards sustainability and socio‐educational development.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Ghaleb Awad El Refae, Abdoulaye Kaba and Shorouq Eletter

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate and assess the first experience of faculty members and students with distance learning implemented at Al Ain University (AAU) to contain the spread of Coronavirus or COVID-19. The paper attempted to understand faculty and students’ satisfaction with institutional readiness for distance learning and perception towards opportunities and challenges of distance learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on data collected in March 2020 through an online survey questionnaire from the participants (students = 445, faculty members = 139). The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) was used in formulating a conceptual framework. The collected data were analysed using several statistical techniques and partial least square structural equation modelling, to test and verify hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that, although faculty members and students expressed high satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning and believed in its opportunities and advantages, they expressed concerns about the challenges facing distance learning. Findings of the study indicated a relationship between the status or college of the participant and perceived opportunities and advantages of distance learning. Hypotheses testing supported the study framework and UTAUT theory by identifying and confirming the impact of perceived opportunities of distance learning on satisfaction with the institutional readiness for distance learning.

Originality/value

The study suggested that non-distance learning institutions should keep offering courses through distance learning to prevent any shortcomings in the future.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Robin Roy, Stephen Potter and Karen Yarrow

This paper aims to summarise the methods and main findings of a study of the environmental impacts of providing higher education (HE) courses by campus‐based and distance

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarise the methods and main findings of a study of the environmental impacts of providing higher education (HE) courses by campus‐based and distance/open‐learning methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of an environmental audit, with data from surveys of 20 UK courses – 13 campus‐based, seven print‐based and online distance learning courses – covering travel, paper and print consumption, computing, accommodation, and campus site impacts. Results were converted into energy and CO2 emissions per student per 100 hours of degree study.

Findings

Distance learning HE courses involve 87 per cent less energy and 85 per cent lower CO2 emissions than the full‐time campus‐based courses. Part‐time campus HE courses reduce energy and CO2 emissions by 65 and 61 per cent, respectively, compared with full‐time campus courses. The lower impacts of part‐time and distance compared with full‐time campus courses is mainly due to a reduction in student travel and elimination of much energy consumption of students' housing, plus economies in campus site utilisation. E‐learning appears to offer only relatively small energy and emissions reductions (20 and 12 per cent, respectively) compared with mainly print‐based distance learning courses, mainly because online learning requires more energy for computing and paper for printing.

Research limitations/implications

Assumptions were made in order to calculate the energy and emissions arising from the different HE systems. For example, it was decided to include all the energy consumed in term‐time accommodation for full‐time campus students while part‐time campus and distance learning students live at home, only requiring additional heating and lighting for study. Future studies could include more distance and blended learning courses offered by institutions other than the UK Open University and impacts other than CO2 emissions.

Practical implications

Existing HE sustainability programmes should be broadened beyond considering campus site impacts and “greening the curriculum”. Indeed, were HE expansion to take environmental impacts seriously, then part‐time and distance education should be prioritised over increasing full‐time provision. This appears compatible with the Leitch Review of Skills on continuing education and training for the UK workforce.

Originality/value

The paper represents the only existing quantitative study of this issue.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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