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Article

Alexis A. Adams-Clark, Marina N. Rosenthal and Jennifer J. Freyd

Although prior research has indicated that posttraumatic stress symptoms may result from sex-based harassment, limited research has targeted a key posttraumatic outcome  

Abstract

Purpose

Although prior research has indicated that posttraumatic stress symptoms may result from sex-based harassment, limited research has targeted a key posttraumatic outcome – dissociation. Dissociation has been linked to experiences of betrayal trauma and institutional betrayal; sex-based harassment is very often a significant betrayal creating a bind for the target. The purpose of this paper is to extend existing research by investigating the relationship between sex-based harassment, general dissociation, sexual dissociation and sexual communication.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study utilized self-report measures from a sample of male and female Oregon residents using Amazon Mechanical Turk (N=582).

Findings

Results of regression analyses indicated that harassment statistically predicted higher general dissociation, higher sexual dissociation and less effective sexual communication, even after controlling for prior sexual trauma experiences. Results did not indicate any significant interactions between gender and harassment.

Practical implications

When considering the effects of sex-based harassment on women and men, clinicians and institutional organizations should consider the role of dissociation as a possible coping mechanism for harassment.

Originality/value

These correlational findings provide evidence that sex-based harassment is uniquely associated with multiple negative psychological outcomes in men and women.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article

Alejandro B. Engel, Eduardo Massad and Petronio Pulino

Proposes a modified Hill model for the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve. The model fits normal oxyhaemoglobin dissociation experimental data quite accurately, and can…

Abstract

Proposes a modified Hill model for the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve. The model fits normal oxyhaemoglobin dissociation experimental data quite accurately, and can easily be adapted to experimental data of subjects suffering haemoglobinopathies when available. Discusses the Adair equation, as well as correcting factors for varying temperature and pH.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article

P. Bielkowicz

WHEN the temperature of the gas reaches the high level, the molecules begin to break up into atoms or groups of atoms, which after recombination form new and smaller…

Abstract

WHEN the temperature of the gas reaches the high level, the molecules begin to break up into atoms or groups of atoms, which after recombination form new and smaller molecules of a simpler structure. For instance, tri‐atomic molecules after having been split form diatomic ones. This process is called the dissociation of gases. The newly‐formed molecules, when colliding, again form molecules of the original gas, so two processes are occurring simultaneously. However, the higher the temperature, the larger the percentage of dissociated molecules.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Sarah L. Parry and Mike Lloyd

The term dissociation can describe a coping strategy to protect oneself against something unwanted in the moment, a disconnection from sensations and experiences in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The term dissociation can describe a coping strategy to protect oneself against something unwanted in the moment, a disconnection from sensations and experiences in the here and now. Although the more severe experiences of dissociation have been the subject of intense study over the last two decades, much less has been written about clients commonly seen in mental health services with mild to moderate dissociative conditions. Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to attend to therapeutic work with a client who experienced moderate dissociation, which caused disruptions to her autobiographical narrative and sense-of-self.

Design/methodology/approach

This single case design details the therapeutic journey of a Caucasian woman in her early 40s, who experienced moderate dissociation. The report illustrates how the process of creative artwork formulation helped address unwanted dissociative experiences whilst enhancing other coping strategies.

Findings

The client’s personal resources combined with a creative and responsive approach to formulation and reformulation facilitated the process of reconnecting with herself and others through developing awareness of her strengths and past means of coping, finally developing a consistent self-narrative.

Practical implications

The experiences of a creative approach to formulation are discussed in relation to the client’s past traumas and case relevant theory. These preliminary findings suggest creative artwork formulation is an effective tool in terms of developing trust and shared understanding within the therapeutic relationship and meaning making processes throughout therapy.

Originality/value

This case study presents an account of creative artwork formulation used as a method of formulation and reformulation specifically with a client experiencing moderate dissociative experiences following interpersonal traumas. Further, the report discusses the ways in which creative artwork formulation facilitated memory exploration and integration, as well as containing meaning making and healing.

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Article

P. Bielkowicz

A GENERAL outline of the processes occurring in the working fluid of a rocket engine has been summarized previously, but the total picture is still far from complete, a…

Abstract

A GENERAL outline of the processes occurring in the working fluid of a rocket engine has been summarized previously, but the total picture is still far from complete, a number of important phenomena not having been taken into account. Their full analysis would be, however, beyond the scope of this paper, and may be left to specialists more qualified than the author to give an account of combustion processes.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

P. Bielkowicz

THE transformation of energy stored in the fuel into heat energy of exhaust gases was followed in the previous parts. The molecular changes occurring in the working fluid…

Abstract

THE transformation of energy stored in the fuel into heat energy of exhaust gases was followed in the previous parts. The molecular changes occurring in the working fluid were investigated, as well as the changes of its physical constants due to the high pressures and temperatures. It is known that the combustion of hydrocarbon fuel results for the most part in the formation of CO2 and H2O as combustion products and consequently special attention is given to the behaviour of these gases since they constitute the working fluid of a rocket engine. The general equation of hydrocarbon combustion has the following form:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 18 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Expert briefing

Ties have been difficult since Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri reversed his Saudi-inspired resignation on November 4, despite his insistence that it was on the basis that…

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Article

Toshihiro Miyake, Masaru Ishida and Satoshi Inagaki

The paper aims to focus on lowering the soldering temperature of ionic compound free soldering using 9,10‐dihydroanthracene as a hydrocarbon flux.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to focus on lowering the soldering temperature of ionic compound free soldering using 9,10‐dihydroanthracene as a hydrocarbon flux.

Design/methodology/approach

The ability of 9,10‐dihydroanthracene to reduce cupric oxide in the presence of peroxides including tert‐butyl peroxybenzoate, tert‐butyl cumyl peroxide, tert‐butyl peroxide was investigated. The applicability of 9,10‐dihydroanthracene in the presence of peroxides as ionic compound free flux reagents was experimentally examined in the soldering of pre‐oxidized copper electrodes under practical conditions.

Findings

The ability of 9,10‐dihydroanthracene for the reduction of cupric oxide powder under argon atmosphere at 300°C for 120 s was found to be improved in the presence of tert‐butyl peroxybenzoate. The highest reducing ability of 9,10‐dihydroanthracene in the presence of tert‐butyl peroxybenzoate among the peroxides was in agreement with the lowest homolytical O–O bond dissociation energies of the peroxides calculated by the theoretical calculation. 9,10‐Dihydroanthracene in the presence of tert‐butyl peroxybenzoate showed the highest soldering efficiency under practical conditions (soldering temperature: 300°C) and sufficient reliability in the environmental testing.

Originality/value

The findings demonstrate that peroxide additives improve the applicability of 9,10‐dihydroanthracene as ion free soldering even under practical conditions.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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Article

Brendan M. O’Mahony, Becky Milne and Kevin Smith

Intermediaries facilitate communication with many types of vulnerable witnesses during police investigative interviews. The purpose of this paper is to find out how…

Abstract

Purpose

Intermediaries facilitate communication with many types of vulnerable witnesses during police investigative interviews. The purpose of this paper is to find out how intermediaries engage in their role in cases where the vulnerable witness presents with one type of vulnerability, namely, dissociative identity disorder (DID).

Design/methodology/approach

In phase 1, data were obtained from the National Crime Agency Witness Intermediary Team (WIT) to ascertain the demand for intermediaries in DID cases in England and Wales within a three-year period. In phase 2 of this study four intermediaries who had worked with witnesses with DID completed an in-depth questionnaire detailing their experience.

Findings

Referrals for DID are currently incorporated within the category of personality disorder in the WIT database. Ten definite DID referrals and a possible additional ten cases were identified within this three-year period. Registered Intermediary participants reported having limited experience and limited specific training in dealing with DID prior to becoming a Registered Intermediary. Furthermore, intermediaries reported the many difficulties that they experienced with DID cases in terms of how best to manage the emotional personalities that may present.

Originality/value

This is the first published study where intermediaries have shared their experiences about DID cases. It highlights the complexities of obtaining a coherent account from such individuals in investigative interviews.

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Article

Richard Cross

This paper aims to explore an integrated therapeutic care approach for a group of children and young people who have experienced chronic and enduring interpersonal trauma.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore an integrated therapeutic care approach for a group of children and young people who have experienced chronic and enduring interpersonal trauma.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims to emphasise the need to routinely assess for that which could have been relationally traumatic, as this is the context in which many looked‐after children's and young people's developmental experiences occur. In particular, it explores the need to have trauma‐informed assessments, clinically effective interventions based on this knowledge, and the need to ensure that a therapeutically enabling environment and organisational functioning is maintained, in order to improve outcomes. It builds on existing work on trauma systems theory, both within an organisational context and within a holistic completely integrated (therapy/assessment, care, education) residential child care treatment process.

Findings

This research raises consideration of the manner in which interpersonally traumatic experiences with the child's primary attachment figures (accommodation complex) may create the context in which children employ dissociative coping. This also may have possible helpful connections for those working with adults diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Originality/value

The paper provides a systemic model based on three strands of understanding, namely trauma, attachment and dissociation, which can provide an underpinning assessment and interventions model for children in residential care.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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