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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Judith Davidson and Cynthia Jacobs

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data…

Abstract

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data analysis software in higher education research courses. This change has significant implications for their practice as researchers and teachers. In this article we provide experienced‐based recommendations for individual practice (research instructors, dissertation advisers, and doctoral students) and for institutional practice (scaling up for deep integration of qualitative data analysis software). Our recommendations are grounded in hard‐earned experience gleaned from many years of working with individuals and institutional contexts to improve the use of qualitative research in higher education.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Carolyn J. Siccama and Stacy Penna

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data…

Abstract

As qualitative researchers struggle to come to grips with the technological revolution, they are faced with the necessity of learning and teaching qualitative data analysis software in higher education research courses. This change has significant implications for their practice as researchers and teachers. In this article we provide experienced‐based recommendations for individual practice (research instructors, dissertation advisers, and doctoral students) and for institutional practice (scaling up for deep integration of qualitative data analysis software). Our recommendations are grounded in hard‐earned experience gleaned from many years of working with individuals and institutional contexts to improve the use of qualitative research in higher education.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2007

Sarah Kuhn and Judith Davidson

In this article, two experienced QR instructors argue that reflective attention to the tools and materials used by researchers and instructors can help to enhance student…

Abstract

In this article, two experienced QR instructors argue that reflective attention to the tools and materials used by researchers and instructors can help to enhance student learning. Identifying three sorts of things in QR those on which research is conducted (texts, images, etc.); the technologies used by the researcher, from software to notebooks; and the objects of the culture under study the authors discuss three examples of their use of things in the context of QR. A detailed case discussion based on the authors’ experience with flip chart paper, NVivo software and Tinkertoy concept maps reveals some of the benefits of attention to things. Based on their analysis, the authors conclude that there are four ways in which a focus on things can support learning and teaching: by scaffolding student understanding, by providing transparency in the learning and research process, by representing and supporting multiple views and perspectives, and by promoting reflexivity and reflection.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Dawn G. Williams, Tawana L. Carr and Nicole S. Clifton

While numerous approaches have been suggested for the improvement of elementary and secondary education in American urban public schools, one common component of such…

Abstract

While numerous approaches have been suggested for the improvement of elementary and secondary education in American urban public schools, one common component of such plans is the more effective utilization of computers, networking, and other educational technologies. When making these considerations, leaders must look at information regarding demographic analysis, assessments, demand factors, and access. The Digital Divide shines a light on the role computers play in widening social gaps throughout our society, particularly between White students and students of color. By providing equitable and meaningful access to technology we can create a stronger assurance that all children step into the 21st century prepared. Home access to computer technology is a continuous area of inequality in American society. If society assumes that academic achievement is facilitated by access to computers both at school and in the home, the gap in access to computer technology is a cause for concern.

Details

Technology and Education: Issues in Administration, Policy, and Applications in K12 Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-280-1

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Mary A. Smith, Angela M. White, Kelsie M. Bernot, Cailisha L. Petty, C. Dinitra White, Grace E. Byfield, Robert H. Newman, Roy J. Coomans and Checo J. Rorie

As the US transitions to a majority–minority population, the underrepresentation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce must be resolved…

Abstract

As the US transitions to a majority–minority population, the underrepresentation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce must be resolved to ensure that our nation maintains its competitiveness and global economic advantage. The persistent problem of retaining underrepresented minority (URM) students in STEM continues to be a national priority after several decades of attention. The role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in addressing this challenge cannot be overstated, given their history in producing African American STEM graduates. As the largest HBCU in the country, North Carolina A&T State University (NC A&T) serves a combined undergraduate and graduate population of 11,877 students, 78% of which self-identify as African American. To overcome the multiple challenges that impede retention and persistence to degree completion in biology, the Department of Biology at NC A&T has adopted a major cultural shift in its advising strategy. The new approach encompasses a Life Mapping and Advising Model that builds faculty–student relationships and engages both parties effectively in the process. The model includes six important pillars to drive student success: (1) dedicated advising space, the Life Mapping and Advising Center (LMAC), (2) effective advisors, (3) integrated peer mentor and peer tutoring programs, (4) an intrusive advising strategy, (5) integration with first-year student success courses, and (6) life coaching. Although the program is in its infancy, based on the first-year assessment data, we have observed many promising trends that, together, point toward successful retention and persistence of our students in the major.

Details

Broadening Participation in STEM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-908-9

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Shane P. McGoey

The purpose of this study is to extend the research of Michael, Schwartz, and Balraj pertaining to presidential effectiveness. Faculty senate chairpersons, academic deans…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to extend the research of Michael, Schwartz, and Balraj pertaining to presidential effectiveness. Faculty senate chairpersons, academic deans, senior‐level institutional officers, and student leaders were surveyed in order to ascertain whether there was a relationship between stakeholders' perceptions and whether the findings support the original study conducted by Michael et al.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive, survey research methodology was utilized to survey 36 institutions of higher learning in the state of Ohio. Each participant was requested to complete a two‐page survey that included questions related to indicators of presidential effectiveness, factors associated with the president's role at their respective institution, and ways of improving presidential effectiveness. Analysis of the data included a descriptive analysis of means and standard deviations; Spearman rho coefficient to obtain correlations of ranked data; and an Analysis of Variance to identify differences among each independent variable.

Findings

Analysis of the data showed that participants agreed that all of the indicators of effectiveness were important. Additionally, stakeholders and trustees agree more than they disagree on the indicators of effectiveness and the role of a president.

Practical implications

The implications of this research suggest that an assessment of the president should include institutional stakeholders in the process coupled with a detailed assessment of the institution. Strong oversight by the governing board is important to ensure integrity of the process, respect for individuals and the office of the president, and support for the professional development of a president.

Originality/value

This study extended the research of Michael et al. pertaining to presidential effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Carol A. Mullen

The author's purpose is to identify and analyze the progress of proposals and dissertations after mentor–mentee relationships rapidly transitioned to intensive online…

Abstract

Purpose

The author's purpose is to identify and analyze the progress of proposals and dissertations after mentor–mentee relationships rapidly transitioned to intensive online doctoral mentoring as a result of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory pedagogic research design was implemented in 2020 to examine the COVID-19 Dyadic Online Mentoring Intervention, a four-month individualized approach to mentorship. A survey was completed by mentees in an educational leadership cohort that revealed the benefits and drawbacks of technology for learning within online doctoral mentoring contexts. Additional sources of data were published literature, mentor's notes, email exchanges, and scholarly enrichment products.

Findings

Data analysis yielded three themes: (1) mentoring strategies were utilized; (2) the pandemic unsettled reality and (3) personal professional development opportunities were evident. Although life challenges were exacerbated by the pandemic, the online doctoral mentoring intervention met dissertation-related needs and supported academic progress in a Doctorate in Education degree program.

Practical implications

Technology-mediated mentoring during crises involves more than modality changes. Faculty mentors should not be solely responsible for mitigating program and dissertation disruption. Academic cultures must support the adoption of pedagogic innovations like high-quality online doctoral mentoring.

Originality/value

Online doctoral mentoring structures utilizing synchronous and asynchronous technologies can help mentees make academic progress in a crisis, not only in “normal” times.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Michael D. White, Natalie Todak and Janne E. Gaub

The purpose of this paper is to assess perceptions of body-worn cameras (BWCs) among citizens who had BWC-recorded police encounters, and to explore the potential for a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess perceptions of body-worn cameras (BWCs) among citizens who had BWC-recorded police encounters, and to explore the potential for a civilizing effect on citizen behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

From June to November 2015, the authors conducted telephone interviews with 249 citizens in Spokane (WA) who had a recent BWC-recorded police encounter.

Findings

Respondents were satisfied with how they were treated during the police encounter and, overall, had positive attitudes about BWCs. However, only 28 percent of respondents were actually aware of the BWC during their own encounter. The authors also found little evidence of a civilizing effect but did document a significant, positive connection between awareness of the BWC and enhanced perceptions of procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

Authors only interviewed citizens who had encounters with officers wearing BWCs. However, variation in BWC awareness among citizens allowed the authors to construct a proxy “non-BWC condition” for comparison.

Practical implications

The pre-conditions necessary to produce a civilizing effect among citizens are complex and difficult to achieve. The intriguing relationship between BWC awareness and procedural justice suggests the technology may have the potential to improve police legitimacy.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to explore attitudes about BWCs among those who have their police encounters recorded, and results demonstrate high levels of support among this population. Findings bode well for continued adoption of BWCs in policing.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

David Starr-Glass

The purpose of this conceptual study is to reflect on “career” and consider the ways in which its meaning and structure have changed and will continue to change during the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual study is to reflect on “career” and consider the ways in which its meaning and structure have changed and will continue to change during the era of Industry 4.0. It contends that career advice to students and soon-to-be graduates is an integral part of the educational process and that an understanding of the challenges and opportunities presented by career should be initiated within academia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a critical reflection on the literature and the present author’s experience and practice in student career advisement, particularly in the management and business sectors. The methodology used is essentially phenomenological, and the central approach is to make sense of the changing construct of career and the ways in which those changes impact relevant stakeholders. The work is not empirically based and may well have limited generalizability. Nevertheless, it is hoped that it will be of particular interest, value and relevancy to students, graduates and those engaged in career-related issues.

Findings

This study contends that the ongoing evolution of career is best understood as a shift from a progressive sequences of “doing” towards a more expansive and meaningful narrative of “being” and becoming. Recognition of this shift, especially for those studying business-centered subjects, will provide graduates with a better map and direction as they embark on their career trajectories.

Originality/value

Graduation success is critically important for individuals, educational institutions and society at large. A fundamental aspect of perceived success, particularly for business school graduates, is the ability to develop a rewarding career trajectory. This study offers original perspectives on career and presents suggestions that may be of value to those who are about to graduate, to their educational institutions and to those who will deal with them in their work and professional futures.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2011

Juan E. Gilbert

“The Computing Research Association (CRA) is an association of more than 200 North American academic departments of computer science, computer engineering, and related…

Abstract

“The Computing Research Association (CRA) is an association of more than 200 North American academic departments of computer science, computer engineering, and related fields; laboratories and centers in industry, government, and academia engaging in basic computing research; and affiliated professional societies” (CRA, 2010a). Each year the CRA publishes its Taulbee Survey. “The Taulbee Survey is the principal source of information on the enrollment, production, and employment of Ph.D.s in computer science and computer engineering (CS & CE) and in providing salary and demographic data for faculty in CS & CE in North America. Statistics given include gender and ethnicity breakdowns” (Computer Research Association, CRA, 2010a).

Details

Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-168-8

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