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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Michael Wade, Didier C-L Bonnet and Jialu Shan

This paper provides evidence based quantification of both “actual” disruption of industries as well as a measure of disruption “hype”. The data cover a seven-year period…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides evidence based quantification of both “actual” disruption of industries as well as a measure of disruption “hype”. The data cover a seven-year period from 2012 to 2018 across 12 industries. The authors’ complemented the research with a survey of 2000 business executives. Whereas there has been some measures of disruption in the past, no research to the authors’ knowledge has been conducted that measure both actual disruption and disruption hype.

Design/methodology/approach

The current fascination with disruption hides an awkward truth, we assume it is happening, but do we really know for sure? Disruption is rarely defined and almost never measured. Equally, the influence of the hype around disruption is hard to gauge. The authors do not know to what extent hype is driving management action. This is worrisome as the disruption “noise level” can lead to unhealthy collective thinking and bad business decision-making. Some rigour is required. To craft winning strategies, executives should take a more evidence-based approach for managing disruption.

Findings

The authors’ failed to find evidence of any correlation between the hype around an industry disruption and actual disruption within that industry. So the important conclusion for executives is “do not believe the hype”. We found some surprising differences by industry between actual disruption and the hype by industry.

Research limitations/implications

Disruption is one of the most talked about subject in the field of strategy, yet there is little quantification. With this research, the authors’ aim is to advance the fact-based understanding of disruption. Disruption hype is never measured but has a strong influence on executives. The authors have quantified hype using online, search, social media and survey sources. Much more is needed to be able to measure hype more accurately.

Practical implications

The authors’ recommend a set of practical guidelines for executives to support fact-based strategy formulation: analysis of actual disruption, scenario planning and strategic responses.

Social implications

The “noise” around industry disruption is so high that it is assumed to happen. Much of what is written is quasi-fake news. The authors need to rebalance the debate with fact-based analysis.

Originality/value

To authors’ knowledge, there has never been any fact-based analysis of both actual and hype disruption levels.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Joseph Roh, Travis Tokar, Morgan Swink and Brent Williams

The lean and global character of supply networks today opens supply chains to potential disruptions, especially in volatile environments. Most disruptions are of…

Abstract

Purpose

The lean and global character of supply networks today opens supply chains to potential disruptions, especially in volatile environments. Most disruptions are of relatively low potential impact; however, firms also occasionally face high-impact disruptions that may even threaten survival. This study applies and extends absorptive capacity concepts to organize resilience capabilities identified in the literature and to examine whether capabilities that provide low-impact resilience are different from those that provide high-impact resilience. A second and related objective is to evaluate whether low-impact resilience supports high-impact resilience through “learning by experience.”

Design/methodology/approach

Survey and industry data are used to understand capabilities involved with achieving both low-impact resilience and high-impact resilience.

Findings

The results of our analysis of survey and industry data uncover significant complex interactions in the effects of capabilities and volatility on resilience; suggesting that different absorptive capacity capabilities are related to low-impact resilience and high-impact resilience, respectively, and these effects depend on industry context. Moderating influences of exploitation capability and environmental volatility are consistent with a “learning by experience” explanation of the association of low-impact resilience to high-impact resilience.

Originality/value

This study thus provides a unifying framework with which to consider resiliency capabilities. Further, it answers a question raised in prior research, and it extends our understanding of important relationships between capabilities for different levels of resilience.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Arash Azadegan, Iana Shaheen, Kevin Linderman and Alireza Fereidooni

The authors empirically determine the stages and leadership styles that enhance the effectiveness of firm response and recovery efforts during each stage.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors empirically determine the stages and leadership styles that enhance the effectiveness of firm response and recovery efforts during each stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use an inductive exploratory approach and mixed-method research design. Study 1 uses a combination of qualitative data gathered through two rounds of exploratory focus groups (26 managers and executives), Q-sorting (60 participants) and a confirmatory focus group (6 experts) to highlight how expert practitioners perceive the staged progression of a supply chain disruption. Study 2 uses responses from 90 experienced managers in an experimental vignette to determine the most effective leadership style during each stage.

Findings

Expert practitioners are strongly partial to a two-staged disruption model that includes an early/response and late/recovery stage. They consider decisiveness to be the most effective style in the response stage. However, in the recovery stage, a style that combines decisiveness and task-centered leadership is perceived to be the most effective. Further, effective leadership hinges on applying distinct styles depending on the progression of events during supply chain disruptions.

Originality/value

Empirical evidence and validation of conceptual models on leadership behavior during crises are essentially nonexistent in the literature. This study is likely the first to pursue the subject of leadership during stages of crises and the first to offer empirical evidence thereof. Relatedly, the authors contribute to the growing research on crisis management, which is likely to receive even more attention as the frequency and size of crises facing organizations increase.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Ehsan Mohebban-Azad, Amir-Reza Abtahi and Reza Yousefi-Zenouz

This study aims to design a reliable multi-level, multi-product and multi-period location-inventory-routing three-echelon supply chain network, which considers disruption

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to design a reliable multi-level, multi-product and multi-period location-inventory-routing three-echelon supply chain network, which considers disruption risks and uncertainty in the inventory system.

Design/methodology/approach

A robust optimization approach is used to deal with the effects of uncertainty, and a mixed-integer nonlinear programming multi-objective model is proposed. The first objective function seeks to minimize inventory costs, such as ordering costs, holding costs and carrying costs. It also helps to choose one of the two modes of bearing the expenses of shortage or using the excess capacity to produce at the expense of each. The second objective function seeks to minimize the risk of disruption in distribution centers and suppliers, thereby increasing supply chain reliability. As the proposed model is an non-deterministic polynomial-time-hard model, the Lagrangian relaxation algorithm is used to solve it.

Findings

The proposed model is applied to a real supply chain in the aftermarket automotive service industry. The results of the model and the current status of the company under study are compared, and suggestions are made to improve the supply chain performance. Using the proposed model, companies are expected to manage the risk of supply chain disruptions and pay the lowest possible costs in the event of a shortage. They can also use reverse logistics to minimize environmental damage and use recycled goods.

Originality/value

In this paper, the problem definition is based on a real case; it is about the deficiencies in the after-sale services in the automobile industry. It considers the disruption risk at the first level of the supply chain, selects the supplier considering the parameters of price and disruption risk and examines surplus capacity over distributors’ nominal capacity.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

John Camillus, Shoba Ramanadhan and Krishnan Ganapathy

The business environment is increasingly fraught with societal disruptions—caused by factors such as pandemics, climate change and the probability of sentient…

Abstract

Purpose

The business environment is increasingly fraught with societal disruptions—caused by factors such as pandemics, climate change and the probability of sentient machines—that are fundamentally different than the industry disruptions that firms have experienced and determined how to overcome. Societal disruptions create chaotic ambiguity and unknowable futures. This paper offers an approach to strategic management in the context of societal disruptions, employing purpose-driven “smart power” to harmonize the organization and the environment and promote both economic and social sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates the construct of smart power that blends hard and soft power, the concepts of purpose and identity that define what is core, aspirational, enduring and distinctive about the organization and the techniques of taming wicked problems in order to design processes and structures that can function in the context of social disruptions.

Findings

The paper offers a strategic management approach that employs purpose-driven smart power to overcome the challenge and thrive in the context of chaotic ambiguity.

Practical implications

The approach offers practical guidelines for designing processes and structures that can guide strategic decision making in organizations challenged by societal disruptions.

Originality/value

The distinctive and daunting challenge posed by societal disruptions is delineated, and constructs and frameworks from multiple disciplines are uniquely integrated to potentially tame the chaotic ambiguity and unknowable futures created by these disruptions.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Mitchell J. van den Adel, Thomas A. de Vries and Dirk Pieter van Donk

Critical infrastructures (CIs) for essential services such as water supply and electricity delivery are notoriously vulnerable to disruptions. While extant literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Critical infrastructures (CIs) for essential services such as water supply and electricity delivery are notoriously vulnerable to disruptions. While extant literature offers important insights into the resilience of CIs following large-scale disasters, our understanding of CI resilience to the more typical disruptions that affect CIs on a day-to-day basis remains limited. The present study investigates how the interorganizational (supply) network that uses and manages the CI can mitigate the adverse consequences of day-to-day disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal archival data on 277 day-to-day disruptions within the Dutch national railway CI were collected and analyzed using generalized estimating equations.

Findings

The empirical results largely support the study’s predictions that day-to-day disruptions have greater adverse effects if they co-occur or are relatively unprecedented. The findings further show that the involved interorganizational network can enhance CI resilience to these disruptions, in particular, by increasing the overall level of cross-boundary information exchange between organizations inside the network.

Practical implications

This study helps managers to make well-informed choices regarding the target and intensity of their cross-boundary information-exchange efforts when dealing with day-to-day disruptions affecting their CI. The findings illustrate the importance of targeting cross-boundary information exchange at the complete interorganizational network responsible for the CI and to increase the intensity of such efforts when CI disruptions co-occur and/or are unprecedented.

Originality/value

This study contributes to our academic understanding of how network-level processes (i.e. cross-boundary information exchange) can be managed to ensure interorganizational (supply) networks’ resilience to day-to-day disruptions in a CI context. Subsequent research may draw from the conceptual framework advanced in the present study for examining additional supply network-level processes that can influence the effectiveness of entire supply networks. As such, the present research may assist scholars to move beyond a simple dyadic context and toward examining complete supply networks

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Navin K. Dev, Ravi Shankar, Zach G. Zacharia and Sanjeev Swami

The purpose of this paper is to examine (1) how the recovery speed using promotional investment and (2) distributed production using additive manufacturing (AM) improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine (1) how the recovery speed using promotional investment and (2) distributed production using additive manufacturing (AM) improve the resilience of the supply chain to manage any disruptions in the diffusion of green products.

Design/methodology/approach

The environmental performance, service level performance and economic performance are the measures of interest. These measures are studied through the integration of inventory and production planning (I&PP) of the reverse logistics system and consumer behavior using Bass (1969) model of diffusion of innovation under the paradigm of Industry 4.0 architecture. The Taguchi experimental design framework was used for the simulation analysis.

Findings

The adoption patterns based on the Bass model in conjunction with recovery speed and production on AM during the disruption period suggest that there exist tradeoff decisions between various combinations of information-sharing and I&PP policies.

Practical implications

The extensive sensitivity analyses provide real-time support for managerial decisions. Besides the potentials of Industry 4.0 capabilities, the present research suggests paying close attention to the recovery speed in conjunction with the inventory management system.

Social implications

The integration of consumers' behavior (Bass model) to digital technologies is an additional contribution of the present research toward sustainability issues from the social perspective.

Originality/value

Previous research studies have discussed resilience to manage the ripple effect. However, none of them have addressed the changing scope of resilience to manage the ripple effect caused by the disruption in the diffusion of green products in a reverse logistics setup.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

David Asamoah, Dorcas Nuertey, Benjamin Agyei-Owusu and Ishmael Nanaba Acquah

The study examines organizational security culture as the driver of supply chain security (SCS) practices (information management security, facility management security…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines organizational security culture as the driver of supply chain security (SCS) practices (information management security, facility management security and human resource security). Additionally, the study examines the minimization of occurrence of supply chain disruption as the outcome of SCS practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model grounded on the contingency theory and the dynamic capabilities theory was developed and tested using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM). Data was obtained from 110 manufacturing and service firms in Ghana.

Findings

It was revealed that organizational security culture has a positive and a significant impact on information management security, facility management security and human resource security as hypothesized. In addition, facility management security significantly minimized supply chain disruption occurrence as hypothesized but information management security and human resource security did not.

Originality/value

To the best of the researchers' knowledge, this is the first study that examines organizational security culture as the driver of SCS practices. Additionally, the study is novel in examining the interplay between organizational security culture, SCS practices and supply chain disruption.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Modern Information Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-525-2

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Byung-Gak Son, Sangho Chae and Canan Kocabasoglu-Hillmer

Catastrophic supply chain disruptions can significantly damage the operational and financial performance of firms. While a growing body of literature on supply network…

Abstract

Purpose

Catastrophic supply chain disruptions can significantly damage the operational and financial performance of firms. While a growing body of literature on supply network structures has studied what influences supply networks' vulnerability to supply chain disruptions and capability to recover from them, it remains unclear how supply network structures change after major supply chain disruptions. We aim to provide an understanding of how these changes occur.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a natural experiment approach and supply network data from Factset, this study investigates how firms' supply network structures change after experiencing the catastrophic supply chain disruptions caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan. We capture post-earthquake supply network changes using the measures of degree centrality and ego network density.

Findings

The results of the analysis suggest that compared to unaffected firms, the affected firms experience changes in their supply network structures tending toward lower complexity measured by in-degree centrality, out-degree centrality and ego network density.

Originality/value

This study contributes to social network theory and the complex adaptive supply network literature by providing empirical evidence of structural changes in supply networks after catastrophic supply chain disruptions. A managerial contribution is made by providing a reflection on why these changes might be occurring and alert firms to the challenges of managing complexity in their supply networks.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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