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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Scott S.D. Mitchell

Traditional public health methods for tracking contagious diseases are increasingly complemented with digital tools, which use data mining, analytics and crowdsourcing to…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional public health methods for tracking contagious diseases are increasingly complemented with digital tools, which use data mining, analytics and crowdsourcing to predict disease outbreaks. In recent years, alongside these public health tools, commercial mobile apps such as Sickweather have also been released. Sickweather collects information from across the web, as well as self-reports from users, so that people can see who is sick in their neighborhood. The purpose of this paper is to examine the privacy and surveillance implications of digital disease tracking tools.

Design/methodology/approach

The author performed a content and platform analysis of two apps, Sickweather and HealthMap, by using them for three months, taking regular screenshots and keeping a detailed user journal. This analysis was guided by the walkthrough method and a cultural-historical activity theory framework, taking note of imagery and other content, but also the app functionalities, including characteristics of membership, “rules” and parameters of community mobilization and engagement, monetization and moderation. This allowed me to study HealthMap and Sickweather as modes of governance that allow for (and depend upon) certain actions and particular activity systems.

Findings

Draw on concepts of network power, the surveillance assemblage, and Deleuze’s control societies, as well as the data gathered from the content and platform analysis, the author argues that disease tracking apps construct disease threat as omnipresent and urgent, compelling users to submit personal information – including sensitive health data – with little oversight or regulation.

Originality/value

Disease tracking mobile apps are growing in popularity yet have received little attention, particularly regarding privacy concerns or the construction of disease risk.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Adem Karahoca, Dilek Karahoca and Merve Aksöz

The purpose of the study is to investigate critical factors affecting individuals’ intention to adopt internet of things (IoT) products in healthcare.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate critical factors affecting individuals’ intention to adopt internet of things (IoT) products in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated model was developed based on technology acceptance model (TAM), innovation diffusion theory (IDT), technological innovativeness (TI), protection motivation theory and privacy calculus theory. The model was tested with 426 respondents (222 females, 204 males) using partial least square structural equation model with all data grouped by gender.

Findings

Based on the results of the complete model, perceived advantage (PA), image and perceived ease of use (PEOU) constructs have a significant effect on intention to adopt IoT healthcare technology products. The results show that for females, compatibility and trialability have more impact on PEOU whereas for males PA has more impact on PEOU. Image, perceived privacy risk, perceived vulnerability have more impact on males when compared to females.

Research limitations/implications

Research conducted only among Turkish people.

Originality/value

This study investigated adoption of future technology, “internet of things”, products in healthcare from a behavioral perspective by integrating various theories. The reason is that before launching any technology into the market, its facilitative factors should be researched for the people who are going to use this in their daily routine.

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Helen Sumin Koo and Kris Fallon

The purpose of this paper is to understand what dimensions consumers prefer to track using wearable technology to achieve a healthier lifestyle and how these tracking

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what dimensions consumers prefer to track using wearable technology to achieve a healthier lifestyle and how these tracking dimensions are related.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with potential consumers in the USA, and a series of Pearson’s correlation and regression analysis and multiple regressions was conducted.

Findings

The most preferred self-tracking dimensions, tracking dimensions on others, most private tracking dimensions, most variable dimensions, and the dimensions that need to be improved were identified. The results of this study showed positive relationships overall among similar types of tracking dimensions, such as among dimensions of physical health condition (disease and disorder symptoms and general vital signs), mental health condition (stress level and mood/feeling), healthy lifestyle (fitness, and pose and posture), and productivity and task management (work productivity, location, and time management).

Originality/value

Designers are encouraged to make wearable technology products that are durable, easy to care for, attractive in design, comfortable to wear and use, able to track preferred dimensions, appropriate for various consumers, unobtrusive, portable, and small. This research will guide wearable technology and fashion industry professionals in the development process of wearable technology to benefit consumers by helping them be more self-aware, empowering them to develop a healthier lifestyle, and ultimately increasing their quality of life and well-being.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Lawrence F. Wolper, David N. Gans and Thomas P. Peterson

As a key component of the American health care system, the physician office could be the front line in a bioterrorist attack. Nationally and locally, the primary focus on…

Abstract

As a key component of the American health care system, the physician office could be the front line in a bioterrorist attack. Nationally and locally, the primary focus on this subject appears to be from a hospital preparedness and public health agency perspective, with little attention devoted to primary physician providers in their own offices, and those specialists to whom patients may be referred. While unrelated to bioterrorism, the recent SARS outbreak also brings to the forefront the need for physicians offices to be able to clinically, operationally, and managerially respond to illnesses that mirror the symptoms of known illnesses, but may be more virulent new organisms or hybrids of existing organisms. If the face of bioterrorism is subtle and slow in its presentation, physicians, in their own offices, could be the first providers of care. Will they be prepared, or will they be among the first fatalities in a bioterrorist attack?

Details

Bioterrorism Preparedness, Attack and Response
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-268-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Muhammad Jawad Hashim, Adrianna Prinsloo and Deen M. Mirza

Chronic disease services may be improved if care management processes (CMPs), such as disease‐specific flowsheets and chronic disease registries, are used. The newly…

Abstract

Purpose

Chronic disease services may be improved if care management processes (CMPs), such as disease‐specific flowsheets and chronic disease registries, are used. The newly industrialized Gulf state health service has underdeveloped primary care but higher diabetes prevalence. This paper's aim is to investigate care management processes in United Arab Emirates (UAE) primary care clinics to explore these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey using self‐administered questionnaires given to family physicians and nurses attending a UAE University workshop was used to collect data.

Findings

All 38 participants completed the questionnaire: 68 per cent were women and 81 per cent physicians. Care management processes in use included: medical records, 76 per cent; clinical guidelines, 74 per cent; chronic disease care rooms, 74 per cent; disease‐specific flowsheets, 61 per cent; medical record audits, 57 per cent; chronic disease nurse‐educators, 58 per cent; electronic medical records (EMR), 34 per cent; and incentive plans based on clinical performance, 21 per cent. Only 62 per cent and 48 per cent reported that flowsheets and problem lists, respectively, were completed by physicians. Responses to the open‐ended question included using traditional quality improvement (QI) approaches such as continuing education and staff meetings, but not proactive systems such as disease registries and self‐management.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a small, non‐random sample and the survey instrument's psychometric properties were not collected.

Practical implications

Chronic disease care CMPs are present in UAE clinics but use is limited. Quality improvement should include disease registries, reminder‐tracking systems, patient self‐management support and quality incentives.

Originality/value

This report highlights the lag regarding adopting more effective CMPs in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Shivinder Nijjer, Kumar Saurabh and Sahil Raj

The healthcare sector in India is witnessing phenomenal growth, such that by the year 2022, it will be a market worth trillions of INR. Increase in income levels…

Abstract

The healthcare sector in India is witnessing phenomenal growth, such that by the year 2022, it will be a market worth trillions of INR. Increase in income levels, awareness regarding personal health, the occurrence of lifestyle diseases, better insurance policies, low-cost healthcare services, and the emergence of newer technologies like telemedicine are driving this sector to new heights. Abundant quantities of healthcare data are being accumulated each day, which is difficult to analyze using traditional statistical and analytical tools, calling for the application of Big Data Analytics in the healthcare sector. Through provision of evidence-based decision-making and actions across healthcare networks, Big Data Analytics equips the sector with the ability to analyze a wide variety of data. Big Data Analytics includes both predictive and descriptive analytics. At present, about half of the healthcare organizations have adopted an analytical approach to decision-making, while a quarter of these firms are experienced in its application. This implies the lack of understanding prevalent in healthcare sector toward the value and the managerial, economic, and strategic impact of Big Data Analytics. In this context, this chapter on “Predictive Analytics in Healthcare” discusses sources, areas of application, possible future areas, advantages and limitations of the application of predictive Big Data Analytics in healthcare.

Details

Big Data Analytics and Intelligence: A Perspective for Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-099-8

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Cristiano Storni

The purpose of this paper is to raise issues about the design of personal health record systems (PHRs) and self-monitoring technology supporting self-care practices of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise issues about the design of personal health record systems (PHRs) and self-monitoring technology supporting self-care practices of an increasing number of individuals dealing with the management of a chronic disease in everyday life. It discusses the results of an ethnographic study exposing to analysis the intricacies and practicalities of managing diabetes “in the wild”. It then describe and discuss the patient-centric design of a diabetes journaling platform that followed the analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes ethnometodological investigation based on in depth interviews, observations in a support group for adults with type 1 diabetes, home visits, shadowing sessions and semi-structured interviews with a series of medical experts (endocrinologists, general practitioners and diabetes nurses). Findings informed the design of a proof-of-concept PHR called Tag-it-Yourself (TiY): a mobile journaling platform that enables the personalization of self-monitoring practices. The platform is thoroughly described along with an evaluation of its use with real users.

Findings

The investigation sheds light on a series of general characters of everyday chronic self-care practices, and how they ask to re-think some of the assumptions and connotations of the current medical model and the traditional sick role of the patient – often unreflectively assumed also in the design of personal technologies (e.g. PHR) to be used by patients in clinically un-controlled settings. In particular, the analysis discusses: the ubiquitous nature of diabetes that is better seen as a lifestyle, the key role of lay expertises and different forms of knowledge developed by the patient in dealing with a disease on a daily basis, and the need of more symmetrical interactions and collaborations with the medical experts.

Research limitations/implications

Reported discussions suggest the need of a more holistic view of self-management of chronic disease in everyday life with more attention being paid on the perspective of the affected individuals. Findings have potential implications on the way PHR and systems to support self-management of chronic disease in everyday life are conceived and designed.

Practical implications

The paper suggests designers and policy makers to look at chronic disease not as a medical condition to be disciplined by a clinical perspective but rather as a complex life-style where the medical cannot be separated by other aspects of everyday life. Such shift in the perspective might suggest new forms of collaborations, new ways of creative evidence and new form of knowledge creation and validation in chronic self-care.

Social implications

The paper suggests re-thinking the role of the patient in chronic-disease self-management. In particular, it suggests giving more room to the patient voice and concerns and suggest how these can enrich rather than complicate the generation of knowledge about self-care practices, at least in type 1 diabetes.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on everyday intricacies and practicalities of dealing with a chronic disease. Studies of self-care practices that shed light on the patient perspectives are sporadic and often assume a clinical perspective, its assumptions (e.g. biomedical knowledge is the only one available to improve health outcome, doctors know best) and implications (e.g. compliance, asymmetry between the specialist and the patient).

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Kees‐Jan van Dorp

Prior to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) crisis, detailed information on beef products seemed no real necessity. However, following the outbreak of BSE, the…

Abstract

Prior to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) crisis, detailed information on beef products seemed no real necessity. However, following the outbreak of BSE, the Government felt obliged to protect consumer interest with legislation. Obligatory product information became required for beef traceability. This paper describes how the emergence of beef product information became relevant against the background of BSE. The paper describes the beef sector over time, through two case studies. From both studies, the emergence of product information exchange can be clearly noted. The first study describes the type of information exchanged, before the BSE outbreak. The second study describes the type of information exchanged after the BSE outbreak, prior to compulsory labelling.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Giada Danesi, Mélody Pralong and Vincent Pidoux

Drawing on ethnographic observations of diabetes (self-)management in French-speaking Switzerland and semi-structured interviews with healthcare practitioners, people…

Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic observations of diabetes (self-)management in French-speaking Switzerland and semi-structured interviews with healthcare practitioners, people living with diabetes and their relatives, the chapter aims at shedding light on self-tracking practices of people living with diabetes. It explores the ways people with diabetes measure and learn to recognise body symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycaemia through self-quantification, and act consequently. In particular, the chapter investigates recent medical devices – continuous and flash glucose monitoring systems – that reconfigure the work of health providers and self-care practices. It shows the self-monitoring practices and the resulting self-awareness people living with diabetes develop in interaction with technology and caregivers in order to undertake embodied actions. By pointing out that new technologies have facilitated the access to personal body information and the sharing of it, self-monitoring is also questioned as a form of surveillance, opening up issues of power and control over patients’ behaviours. With regard to this, the chapter illustrates that, occasionally, people with diabetes resist ‘docility’ through micro-powers at the level of everyday life by refusing to engage in their use and by developing personal strategies or ‘tactics’.

Details

Metric Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-289-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Rajesh R. Pai and Sreejith Alathur

This paper discusses the need for government and healthcare organization to implement mobile phone-based solutions for healthcare during the Coronavirus (Covid-19…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the need for government and healthcare organization to implement mobile phone-based solutions for healthcare during the Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. It also highlights the challenges and/or barriers to the rapid introduction, implementation and management of these and other innovative solutions to health service delivery during the current situation

Design/methodology/approach

The data include both qualitative and quantitative, collected from the primary interview-based case study and questionnaire survey. It also uses insights from the general populations, healthcare professionals and health information technology developers to understand the role of a mobile health intervention in the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak.

Findings

Healthcare professionals and health information technology developers are confident that the use of mobile health technology and applications has the ability to assist in monitoring and controlling the COVID-19 outbreak. The key advantages of using mobile phone technology are: increased awareness, improved assistance in tracking and testing casualties, improved assistance in seeking and scheduling health information and medical appointments, increased social distancing, improved overall productivity and quality of life. However, data demonstrated that lack of awareness and accessibility or unwillingness to use the technology, complex healthcare needs, application infrastructure, policies and a dearth of training and support are all barriers to successful implementation of this useful tool.

Practical implications

This research has the potential to make a significant impact on government and healthcare policy through presenting a coherent argument for the importance of designing and deploying mobile health technology and applications for the general population.

Originality/value

prior literature in this domain is inadequate in explaining the importance of mobile phone-based healthcare solutions for health service and during serious disease outbreaks and, in particular, within the Indian context. The findings of this study can be used by government and healthcare organizations to improve health governance during the current global pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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