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1 – 10 of over 23000
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Mandi Goodsett

This review allows librarians to compare three of the major discovery services – EBSCO Discovery Service, Ex Libris’ Primo and Serials Solutions’ Summon – on the basis of…

1099

Abstract

Purpose

This review allows librarians to compare three of the major discovery services – EBSCO Discovery Service, Ex Libris’ Primo and Serials Solutions’ Summon – on the basis of price, content, user experience, features and functionality and back-end configuration to make informed decisions about the best tool for their institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparisons were made through a literature review, study of the vendors’ websites, several interviews and personal usability testing of each tool.

Findings

The tools each have their strengths and weaknesses, and a decision of which tool is most appropriate for an institution varies depending on the institution’s needs and current situation.

Originality/value

A literature review shows that no study has yet been conducted comparing these three discovery tools, and few comparative studies of discovery tools have been published recently.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Sharon Q. Yang and Kurt Wagner

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare open source and proprietary discovery tools and find out how much discovery tools have achieved towards becoming the…

6495

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and compare open source and proprietary discovery tools and find out how much discovery tools have achieved towards becoming the next generation catalog.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes characteristics of the next generation catalog into a check‐list of 12 features. This list was checked against each of seven open source and ten proprietary discovery tools to determine if those features were present or absent in those tools.

Findings

Discovery tools have many next generation catalog features, but only a few can be called real next generation catalogs. Federated searching and relevancy based on circulation statistics are the two areas that both open source and proprietary discovery tools are missing. Open source discovery tools seem to be bolder and more innovative than proprietary tools in embracing advanced features of the next generation catalog. Vendors of discovery tools may need to quicken their steps in catching up.

Originality/value

It is the first evaluation and comparison of open source and proprietary discovery tools on a large scale. It will provide information as to exactly where discovery tools stand in light of the much desired next generation catalog.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Melissa A. Hofmann and Sharon Q. Yang

This paper aims to determine the current usage of next generation online public access catalogs (OPACs) and discovery tools in academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

2599

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the current usage of next generation online public access catalogs (OPACs) and discovery tools in academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the same random sample of 260 colleges and universities in the USA and Canada from their original study, the authors revisited each institution's library web page to ascertain whether the OPAC interface(s) offered were the same or different than in their initial data collection. Data was collected and analyzed in October and November 2011.

Findings

Discovery tool use has practically doubled in the last two years, from 16 percent to 29 percent. A total of 96 percent of academic libraries using discovery tools still provide access to their legacy catalog. The percentage of institutions using ILS OPACs with faceted navigation has increased from 2 percent to 4 percent. Combining the use of discovery tools and faceted OPACs, at least 33 percent of academic libraries are now using a faceted interface. Discovery tools that aim to be the “single point of entry for all library resources” are the most recently popular.

Research limitations/implications

About 16 percent of the institutions (n=43) in the sample either did not have web sites or did not provide access to their online catalogs. Thus, some data might be underreported.

Practical implications

The findings identify trends that may inform academic libraries in the quest to providing next generation interfaces to their varied resources.

Originality/value

This study gives a timely update of next generation catalog (NGC) and discovery tool usage in academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Bijan Kumar Roy, Subal Chandra Biswas and Parthasarathi Mukhopadhyay

This paper aims to provide an overview of the emergence of resource discovery systems and services along with their advantages and best practices including current…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the emergence of resource discovery systems and services along with their advantages and best practices including current landscapes. It reports the development of a resource discovery system by using the “VuFind” software and describes other technological tools, software, standards and protocols required for the development of the prototype.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the process of integrating VuFind (resource discovery tool) with Koha (integrated library system), DSpace (repository software) and Apache Tika (as full-text extractor for full-text searching), etc.

Findings

The proposed model performs like other existing commercial and open source Web-scale resource discovery systems and is capable of harvesting resources from different subscribed or external sources replacing a library’s OPAC.

Originality/value

This discovery system is an important add-on to designing a one-stop access in place of the existing retrieval silos in libraries. This system is capable of indexing a variety of content within and beyond library collections. This work may help library professionals and administrators in designing their discovery system, as well as vendors to improve their products, to provide different library-friendly services.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Preedip Balaji Babu and M. Krishnamurthy

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the paradigm shift of library automation to resource discovery by exploring the applications of resource discovery. The present…

3509

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the paradigm shift of library automation to resource discovery by exploring the applications of resource discovery. The present status of India on adapting resource discovery applications is discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

An evaluative method to examine the status quo of India automation and resource discovery scenario is drawn with a related literature review. Moreover, various pertinent global challenges of embracing discovery tools in the digital environment are highlighted.

Findings

The growth of the Indian library automation industry is booming. However, library software adaptation, next‐generation catalogue enhancements and community development avenues are dearth, seemingly remote and far from satisfactory.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the emerging scenario of resource discovery applications with an overview of global challenges.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Andrew Goodchild

Discusses some of the problems designers face in building catalogs in large networks and relates them back to the resource discovery problem. Currently many catalogs tend…

Abstract

Discusses some of the problems designers face in building catalogs in large networks and relates them back to the resource discovery problem. Currently many catalogs tend to be built in an ad hoc fashion ‐ which leads to a great variety in the quality of publicly accessible network catalogs. Furthermore, the research surrounding these catalogs tends to focus on narrow technical issues ‐ resulting in difficult‐to‐use catalogs. Addresses this problem by providing a usability framework based on the library science and human computer interaction literature, and demonstrates some of those principles via an example of a prototype. Results are interesting to resource discovery tool developers in that a framework for understanding the general resource discovery problem is provided and some techniques for dealing with those problems are presented.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Li Fu and Cynthia Thomes

This paper discusses how University of Maryland University College (UMUC) librarians customized EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) to allow for searching across…

1237

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses how University of Maryland University College (UMUC) librarians customized EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) to allow for searching across librarian-selected sets of discipline-specific databases. Discipline-specific searching results in a smaller and more relevant set of search results, which can make research more efficient and effective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the collaboration between systems and reference and instruction librarians to develop, test, launch, promote, and assess discipline-specific searching in EDS in support of effective teaching and learning.

Findings

Customization of a discovery tool to allow researchers to run searches across pre-selected sets of discipline-specific databases is beneficial to the researchers since it enables them to find a smaller and more relevant set of search results than they would otherwise receive if they searched across all databases available in the discovery tool.

Originality/value

This paper provides detailed instructions regarding customization of EDS to allow for discipline-specific searching and discusses ways in which this enhancement can be brought to researchers' attention during reference and instruction interactions. This paper should be of interest to technical librarians as well as to reference and instruction librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Sharon Q. Yang and Melissa A. Hofmann

The study described in this paper aims to identify the progress made in the efforts to model current online public access catalogs (OPACs) after the next generation…

5530

Abstract

Purpose

The study described in this paper aims to identify the progress made in the efforts to model current online public access catalogs (OPACs) after the next generation catalog (NGC) in academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 260 colleges and universities was selected from Peterson's Guide to Four‐Year Colleges 2009, an estimated 10 percent of the total population of 2,560 listed academic institutions. A checklist of 12 features of the NGC was used to evaluate the OPACs of the 260 libraries in the sample. The authors took as the OPAC that which the library linked to as its “catalog,” even though some might be more properly considered “discovery tools” or “discovery layers.” Some libraries used more than one OPAC interface simultaneously; in this case, each OPAC was analyzed separately. In the case of several institutions using the same consortial OPAC, only the first instance of the OPAC was analyzed. About 15 percent of the institutions (n=40) in the sample either did not have web sites or did not provide access to their online catalogs. In all, a total of 233 unique instances of OPACs were analyzed. Data were collected from September 2009 through July 2010. The findings can be extrapolated to the population at the 95 percent confidence level with a confidence interval of ±3.

Findings

While bits and pieces of the next generation catalog are steadily working themselves into the current catalog, academic libraries still have a long way to go. About 16 percent of the OPACs in the sample did not show any advanced features of the NGC. More than half of the libraries (61 percent) had only one to five advanced features in their OPACs. Many of those with six or more NGC features were discovery tools. Only 3 percent of the OPACs in the sample (n=8) demonstrated seven to ten out of the 12 functionalities of the NGC, and they were instances either of WorldCat Local or Summon. The weak areas were federated searching, relevance based on circulation statistics, and recommendations based on patron transactions.

Originality/value

This is the first and only study on a large scale conducted thus far that evaluates the progress towards the NGC in academic libraries in the USA and Canada. The findings help academic librarians to recognize and pin‐point the weak links in implementing a true next generation catalog.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Chris J. Turner, Ashutosh Tiwari, Richard Olaiya and Yuchun Xu

The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison of a number of business process mining tools currently available in the UK market. An outline of the practice of…

3915

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison of a number of business process mining tools currently available in the UK market. An outline of the practice of business process mining is given, along with an analysis of the main techniques developed by academia and commercial entities. This paper also acts as a primer for the acceptance and further use of process mining in industry, suggesting future directions for this practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary research has been completed to establish the main commercial business process mining tool vendors for the market. A literature survey has also been undertaken into the latest theoretical techniques being developed in the field of business process mining.

Findings

The authors have identified a number of existing commercially available business process mining tools and have listed their capabilities within a comparative analysis table. All commercially available business process mining tools included in this paper are capable of process comparison and at least 40 per cent of the tools claim to deal with noise in process data.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is to provide a state‐of‐the‐art review of a number of commercial business process mining tools available within the UK. This paper also presents a summary of the latest research being undertaken in academia in this subject area and future directions for the practice of business process mining.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2017

Robert Hallis

In the future, librarians need to prepare users to navigate a profoundly different informational landscape. Addressing issues of information overload and informed…

Abstract

Purpose

In the future, librarians need to prepare users to navigate a profoundly different informational landscape. Addressing issues of information overload and informed selection of both search tools and results, the purpose of this paper is to cast the collaborative relationship between librarian and student in the mode of an outfitter: a guide preparing a client for a journey. Within this context, the authors emerging role involves guiding students through the task at hand using critical thinking skills to access a wider range of publications to meet a broader range of needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Metaphors created by Raymond and Friedman reflect the current state of information, the relationship users have with these sources, and the role librarians play in a disintermediated environment. In The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Raymond portrays a decentralized environment as a bazaar. In The World is Flat 3.0, Friedman describes how technology flattens organizations through empowering end users. The informational landscape in the twenty-first century is decentralized, and more powerful search tools provide unparalleled access to these sources. Users, however, continue to experience problems finding their information. A librarian/outfitter can prepare users to effectively track information in the new environment.

Findings

In the twenty-first century, a broader range of sources are available, and search engines are turning to dashboards to prioritize the growing list of results. Users need to adapt to the new environment through viewing the search as an activity rather than a destination. Librarians can help this process through sharing their expertise in uncovering likely places relevant information may be found, in evaluating sources, and locating information in a larger context. Through developing the meta-skill of information management, librarians guide users through the process of finding information for personal, professional, and academic needs.

Practical implications

The author’s goal is what it has always been: empowering end users to successfully access needed information in a disintermediated environment. Today librarians need to emphasize a fundamentally different set of skills in the interactions they have with students and faculty. People can use dashboards and satisficing to find sources they need, but librarian/outfitters can introduce a broader range of sources and tools suitable for completing specific tasks. This paper illustrates the different skills needed to effectively find information for personal, professional, and academic tasks.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new context for the process used for locating and validating information in an increasingly broad and diffuse informational landscape. Librarians become advisors in navigating a more complex informational landscape that is used to meet a broader range of informational needs. While focusing on navigating the broader range of resources through decoding dashboards and satisficing techniques, the author can assist users in overcoming information overload and advocate a broader sense of satisficing through using more sophisticated critical thinking skills.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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