Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Qin Chen, Jiahua Jin and Xiangbin Yan

Although online health communities (OHCs) and online patient reviews can help to eliminate health information asymmetry and improve patients' health management, how…

Abstract

Purpose

Although online health communities (OHCs) and online patient reviews can help to eliminate health information asymmetry and improve patients' health management, how patients write online reviews within OHCs is poorly understood. Thus, it is very necessary to determine the factors influencing patients' online review behavior in OHCs, including the emotional response and reviewing effort.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on expectation-disconfirmation theory, this study proposes a theoretical model to analyze the effects of service quality perception (i.e. outcome quality and process quality perceptions) and disconfirmation (i.e. outcome quality and process quality disconfirmations) on patients' emotional response and reviewing effort. The authors test the research model by using empirical data collected from a popular Chinese OHC and applying ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and zero-truncated negative binomial (ZTNB) regression models.

Findings

Both service quality perception and disconfirmation have a positive effect on patients' positive emotional intensity in textual reviews, and disease severity enhances these relationships of process quality. Moreover, there is an asymmetric U-shaped relationship among service quality perception, disconfirmation and reviewing effort. Patients who perceive low service quality have higher reviewing effort, while service quality disconfirmation has the opposite relationship. Specifically, patients' effort in writing textual reviews is lowest when perceived outcome quality is 3.5 (on a five-point scale), perceived process quality is 4 or outcome quality and process quality disconfirmations are −1.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine patients' online review behavior and its motivations and contributes to the literature on online reviews and service quality. In addition, the findings of this study have important management implications for service providers and OHC managers.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Noel Yee Man Siu, Tracy Junfeng Zhang and Ho Yan Kwan

By extending the expectancy-disconfirmation theory and integrating the elaboration likelihood model, this study aims to explore the reference effects (i.e. disconfirmation

Abstract

Purpose

By extending the expectancy-disconfirmation theory and integrating the elaboration likelihood model, this study aims to explore the reference effects (i.e. disconfirmation and self-identity) and customer engagement that affect customer experience on satisfaction with a museum visit. The study is designed to test a dual-mediator mechanism involving disconfirmation and self-identity. The moderating role of cognitive, affective or behavioral engagements is also examined with the overall purpose to advance the understanding of customer experience in cultural consumption such as museum visits.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered field survey in two stages was carried out on visitors to the Hong Kong Museum of Art. A total of 465 valid response sets were used for analysis. Hypotheses were tested using confirmatory factor analysis, three-step mediation test, structural equation modeling and moderation regressions.

Findings

Disconfirmation and self-identity are found to be dual mediators in the experience–satisfaction relationship. Cognitive engagement reduces the effect of knowledge experience on disconfirmation and self-identity but increases that of the entertainment experience on disconfirmation and self-identity. Affective engagement amplifies the effect of knowledge experience on self-identity but mitigates the importance of entertainment evaluations.

Practical implications

Findings highlight the importance of both perceived knowledge and entertainment experiences in visitors’ evaluation of a cultural experience. Managers are suggested to craft promotional messages with the psychological appeal that connects visitors with museum services. Appropriate engagement tactics for museums can be developed to avoid overloading visitors with information.

Originality/value

Previous studies treat disconfirmation as the dominant reference effect in the formation of customer satisfaction. This study shows both disconfirmation and self-identity as dual reference effects that link the customer experience to satisfaction in the museum context, serving as a pioneer in defining how the influence of experience on reference effects varies depending on how customers are cognitively and affectively engaged in such context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Peyman Assadi and Pooria Assadi

Pursuit of meaning is at the heart of much of organizational life. It has implications for how different organizational stakeholders associate value to various…

Abstract

Purpose

Pursuit of meaning is at the heart of much of organizational life. It has implications for how different organizational stakeholders associate value to various organizational initiatives. Research on meaning has generally shown that effort increases meaning and favorable valuation of and willingness to pay for economic activities by organizational stakeholders. The authors build on and advance this research by offering theory and experimental evidence showing that effort, particularly at high levels, results in enhanced meaning and favorable valuation when effort does not threaten the focal stakeholders' resources through expectation disconfirmation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experimental studies are designed and conducted in this research. In one study, the authors replicate prior research findings that establish labor generally increases meaning and favorable valuation. In the two subsequent studies, the authors test the proposed hypothesis in this research and check for robustness of the empirical analysis.

Findings

The authors find that any internalized threat to the focal stakeholder's resources coupled with a high exertion of effort decreases, rather than increases, meaning and favorable valuation of and willingness to pay for economic activities.

Originality/value

The theory and empirical evidence in this research advance the understanding of how organizational stakeholders may associate effort-induced meaning with various economic activities in counter-intuitive ways. The findings also highlight the importance of recognizing and shaping the expectations of organizational stakeholders in influencing willingness to pay in organizational settings.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Hengyun Li, Fang Meng and Bing Pan

With the growing online review manipulation and fake reviews in the hospitality industry, it is not uncommon that a consumer encounters disconfirmation when comparing the…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growing online review manipulation and fake reviews in the hospitality industry, it is not uncommon that a consumer encounters disconfirmation when comparing the existing online reviews with his/her own product or service evaluation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of review disconfirmation on customer online review writing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed-method combining online secondary big data modeling and experimental design.

Findings

Review disconfirmation influences customers’ emotional responses embedded in the review; a customer who encounters review disconfirmation tends to exert more reviewing effort, manifested by writing longer reviews; negativity bias exists in disconfirmation effects, in that negative review disconfirmation shows more significant and stronger effects than positive review disconfirmation.

Practical implications

Findings from this study provide important managerial implications for business owners and marketers who attempt to influence online reviews. The study suggests that fictitious online review manipulation might be detrimental to the business.

Originality/value

This research contributes to two literature streams, including research on the social influence of online consumer reviews, and the relationship between disconfirmation and consumers’ post-consumption behavior, by extending the influence of disconfirmation from the offline context to the online context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Alan Kai Ming Au and Alan Ching Biu Tse

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of expectancy disconfirmation on passengers’ reactions to airline delays.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of expectancy disconfirmation on passengers’ reactions to airline delays.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a between-subject factorial design with 9 treatments involving 161 subjects to collect data to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The study showed that, when given a positive disconfirmation, subjects feel better and are more satisfied, but when given a negative disconfirmation, they feel more negative and dissatisfied. Also, the effect size of positive disconfirmation on satisfaction and feelings about the service provider were significantly less than that of negative disconfirmation of the same size. Hence, in the event of a delay, managers may have to announce the upper bound of the delay duration so that passengers might feel better and become more satisfied when the actual delay duration is shorter than what was initially expected. In addition, they must try their best not to create situations of negative disconfirmation in light of their disproportional impact on satisfaction.

Practical implications

According to the results, airline managers should estimate as accurately as possible the duration of a delay when there is one.

Originality/value

A major contribution of this study is that manipulating the way delay duration information is given to passengers can affect feelings about the delay and the level of satisfaction with the airline.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Michael D. Reisig and Meghan Stroshine Chandek

This study tests the expectancy disconfirmation model using survey data from citizens who recently had police encounters. We find support for the expectancy disconfirmation

3458

Abstract

This study tests the expectancy disconfirmation model using survey data from citizens who recently had police encounters. We find support for the expectancy disconfirmation model’s primary hypothesis that increased disparity between expectations of police performance and actual service inversely affects citizen satisfaction with the way the police handle encounters. This finding persists for both voluntary (e.g. breaking and entering victims) and involuntary (e.g. traffic citations) police encounters. Our results also suggest that the scope of the expectancy disconfirmation model is limited. For example, the disparity between expectations and actual service is not correlated with citizen satisfaction with the police in general. Overall, the results show that the expectancy disconfirmation model is useful in that it provides conceptual guidance in an area of research that has been relatively void of theory, and can also help identify needed changes in police practices.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Josee Bloemer and David Dekker

Different authors suggest that personal values (as opposed to economic values of objects) are important antecedents of service satisfaction. This paper seeks to…

3679

Abstract

Purpose

Different authors suggest that personal values (as opposed to economic values of objects) are important antecedents of service satisfaction. This paper seeks to investigate empirically two specific processes that relate personal values to satisfaction with (financial) services (the value percept disparity model and the (value) disconfirmation model).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper generalizes both models into a new value disparity‐disconfirmation model, providing testable conditions to evaluate and compare the validity of the original models. The paper specifies the model in terms of hierarchical linear models and assesses their empirical fit with data on 18 bank branches.

Findings

The results of the study best support the value disconfirmation model. Furthermore, the paper shows that in the research's setting of a financial service provider the external dimension of values is more instrumental in predicting satisfaction than the internal dimension.

Research limitations/implications

Since only a single service setting has been studied and a limited number of values have been focused on at one particular moment in time, the authors are hesitant to generalize the results beyond the scope of this study.

Practical implications

Employee values are clearly associated with customer satisfaction. In fact, irrespective of their own values, customers do not seem to appreciate it when employees have values that differ from their own. Moreover, external values are more important than internal values in explaining satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper is an empirical test of which model (the value percept disparity model or the value disconfirmation model) is better in explaining customer satisfaction, thereby providing conceptual clarity, theoretical parsimony and practical implications of the impact of personal values on satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Stephanie Gillison and Kristy Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how shoppers’ expectations regarding the amount of search and disconfirmation of these search expectations affect outcomes of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how shoppers’ expectations regarding the amount of search and disconfirmation of these search expectations affect outcomes of the shopping trip.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of shoppers is used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Survey results indicate that search disconfirmation is conceptually distinct from but related to search effort and search regret. The results show that negative search disconfirmation mediates the relationship between search effort and shopper satisfaction, hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, choice confidence, search regret and negative word-of-mouth intent.

Originality/value

The findings underscore that search effort itself is not negative for shoppers. However, when search effort is perceived as excessive compared to shoppers’ expectations, negative retail outcomes can occur. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Saitab Sinha, I.M. Jawahar, Piyali Ghosh and Ashutosh Mishra

Casting employers as customers, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between expectations, perceptions and disconfirmation beliefs with the…

Abstract

Purpose

Casting employers as customers, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between expectations, perceptions and disconfirmation beliefs with the satisfaction of employers regarding the competencies possessed by fresh engineering graduates hired by such employers in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 284 employers, the authors have hypothesized and examined a partial mediation model in which disconfirmation beliefs mediate the relationships between expectations and perceptions, and employer satisfaction. Furthermore, the authors have tested if this mediated relationship is moderated by the age and sex of respondents representing employers.

Findings

Results indicate that employers’ satisfaction can be explained from the framework of the expectancy-disconfirmation theory. Employers’ expectations and perceptions are established to be associated with employers’ satisfaction with new hires, and positive disconfirmation mediates these relationships. Results also indicate that age moderates the effect of predictor variables employers’ expectations and employers’ perception on the mediator disconfirmation. Sex, however, did not moderate any relationship.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate the usefulness of the expectancy-disconfirmation theory for studying employer satisfaction with competencies of recent engineering graduates in India. Findings are relevant to multiple stakeholders including employers hiring engineering graduates, engineers and technical institutions.

Originality/value

Expectancy-disconfirmation theory has been successfully applied to measure customer satisfaction in consumer behaviour research, while satisfaction of employers has been studied in the field of organizational behaviour. The paper stands out in the literature as one of its major implications is to extend the expectancy-disconfirmation theory to predict employers’ satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Peter J. Danaher and Vanessa Haddrell

Many different scales have been used to measure customer satisfaction. These scales can be divided into three main groups, being those measuring performance…

17018

Abstract

Many different scales have been used to measure customer satisfaction. These scales can be divided into three main groups, being those measuring performance, disconfirmation and satisfaction. Reports on the design and execution of a study of hotel guests in which they were asked to rate the key service attributes of their stay using all three of these measurement scales. Repurchase intention and word‐of‐mouth effects were also measured. Compares the scales on the basis of reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, predictive validity, skewness, face validity and managerial value for directing a quality improvement programme. Shows the disconfirmation scale to be superior to both the performance and satisfaction scales on all these criteria except for predictive validity. In addition, the performance scale was generally better than the satisfaction scale on a number of these criteria.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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