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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

K.G.P. Senani, Roshan Ajward and J.S. Kumari

This study aims to examine the determinants and consequences of integrated reporting (IR) disclosures of listed non-financial firms in an emerging economy.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the determinants and consequences of integrated reporting (IR) disclosures of listed non-financial firms in an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data from 39 listed non-financial firms that had adopted IR disclosure framework in Sri Lanka for the period from 2011 to 2018. Firm size, growth opportunity, profitability and firm age are considered significant determinants of IR disclosure, while their consequences are measured in terms of share price, Tobin’s Q, return on assets and return on equity. The authors used the results of the correlation and panel regression analyses to draw this study’s conclusions.

Findings

This study finds that firm size and age are the significant determinants of IR disclosure, which is consistent with this study’s expectations. Considering the consequences of IR disclosure, only share price and Tobin’s Q show significant results as per the panel regression analyses.

Practical implications

The findings of this study would be useful in the decision-making processes of existing and prospective investors, regulators, policymakers and society at large. Further, the findings of this study communicate the benefits of this new reporting paradigm in shaping their disclosures in the annual corporate reporting process.

Originality/value

Although existing studies attempted to examine the determinants of IR disclosure and its consequences as isolated studies, this study provides new insights by merging these two aspects into a single study and consider several determinants and consequences as well.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

Sumit Lodhia, Amanpreet Kaur and Sanjaya Chinthana Kuruppu

This study aims to explore how the top 50 Australian companies are disclosing their commitment to addressing the sustainable development goals (SDGs) formulated by the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how the top 50 Australian companies are disclosing their commitment to addressing the sustainable development goals (SDGs) formulated by the United Nations (UN) in 2015. By investigating the nature and substantiveness of SDG reporting, this study provides exploratory evidence on how companies are taking the initial steps to addressing the SDGs.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of SDG disclosures by the top 50 Australian companies was undertaken. This content analysis was guided by the KPMG (2018) SDG disclosure framework. Legitimacy theory was used to interpret the findings, establishing whether such disclosure was substantive or symbolic.

Findings

This study reports a moderate level of SDG disclosure among Australian companies. The top five most critical SDGs in Australian context are climate action, gender equality, decent work and economic growth, responsible consumption and production and industry, innovation and infrastructure. The findings also highlight that while the focus of Australian companies is on understanding and prioritizing SDGs, the measurement of SDGs performance needs to increase.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to limited literature on the corporate responses to SDGs by establishing how companies, especially in Australia, are addressing these goals through changes to their reporting systems, thereby communicating their strategic intent in relation to addressing these goals. A focus on symbolic legitimation through SDG disclosure by the Australian companies in this study reaffirms the findings of similar studies and suggests a need for more substantive SDG management and disclosure if these goals are to be adequately addressed by the corporate sector.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide insights into the current practices and future prospects of corporate responses to SDGs. Policy implications could arise in relation to possible approaches for disclosing social and environmental information and the paper argues for a potential need for regulation of non-financial reporting.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the limited understanding of the corporate response to an urgent sustainability call made by the UN by providing evidence on how Australian companies are embedding, measuring and reporting the SDGs. The research goes beyond a descriptive analysis of SDG disclosure and assesses whether such disclosure is substantive or symbolic.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Hend Monjed, Salma Ibrahim and Bjørn N. Jørgensen

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between two reporting mechanisms used by managers to communicate risk information to the capital market: risk…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between two reporting mechanisms used by managers to communicate risk information to the capital market: risk disclosure and earnings smoothing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study juxtaposes two competing hypotheses, the “opportunistic” and the “signaling”, and empirically investigates whether one dominates the other for a sample of large UK firms for the period 2005–2015. This study also uses the global financial crisis as an arguably exogenous shock on overall risk in the economy to investigate its effect on managers' joint use of textual risk disclosures and earnings smoothing.

Findings

This study finds that risk disclosure and earnings smoothing are negatively associated. This finding supports that managers with incentives to mask the firm’s true underlying risk through smoothing earnings provide lower levels of risk-related disclosures. This study documents that the trade-off between risk disclosure and earnings smoothing is more pronounced during the global financial crisis period than before and after the crisis period. Further, this study demonstrates a more negative association for firms with higher volatility of cash flows. This negative association is robust to various model specifications, additional corporate governance related controls and an alternative measure of earnings smoothing.

Originality/value

The findings provide new empirical evidence about the association between risk disclosure and earnings smoothing and support the opportunistic hypothesis, especially when firms are faced with increased risk.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Victor Daniel-Vasconcelos, Maisa de Souza Ribeiro and Vicente Lima Crisóstomo

This study aims to investigate the association between the presence of a corporate social responsibility (CSR) committee and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) disclosure

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the association between the presence of a corporate social responsibility (CSR) committee and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) disclosure, as well as the moderating role of gender diversity in this relation.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 897 annual observations from 238 firms from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru for 2018–2020. The data were collected from the Refinitiv database. The proposed model and hypotheses were tested using the feasible generalized least squares estimation technique with heteroscedasticity and panel-specific AR1 autocorrelation.

Findings

The results reveal that the presence of CSR committees positively influences the SDGs. Gender diversity positively moderates the relationship between CSR committees and SDGs. Leverage and firm size also positively impact the SDGs. On the other hand, board size and CEO duality negatively affect SDGs disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the scope of stakeholder theory by suggesting that CSR committees and gender diversity enable a better relationship for the firm with its stakeholders.

Practical implications

The findings support policymakers and managers in improving sustainability disclosure. In addition, the results demonstrate the importance of CSR committees and gender diversity to meet the stakeholders' demands.

Social implications

This study demonstrates how firms can improve sustainability issues through gender diversity and CSR committees.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study complements previous literature by being the first to examine the moderating effect of gender diversity on the association between CSR committees and SDGs disclosure in the Latin American context.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2022

Mariem Ben Abdallah and Slah Bahloul

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of financial performance (FP) and governance on the accounting and auditing organization for Islamic financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of financial performance (FP) and governance on the accounting and auditing organization for Islamic financial institutions (AAOIFI) disclosure for the Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the generalized least squares (GLS) estimation for 47 MENASA (Middle East, North Africa and Southeast Asia) Islamic banks (IBs) between 2012 and 2019. In this regression, disclosure is the endogenous variable. The performance and governance measures are the explanatory parameters. The authors use bank's size, leverage and age for control parameters. The robustness of results is verified via generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation method.

Findings

The findings indicate that performance measurement has weak effects on AAOIFI disclosure. Only the net interest margin (NIM) measure has a significant positive impact. The return of assets (ROA) and the return on equity (ROE) have a significant negative impact. Furthermore, all Shariah Governance measures have significant effects. Finally, the findings of this study support the governance's positive contribution to the disclosure in IBs.

Practical implications

Through including the whole issues allied to AAOIFI and their impacts on the banks' value, this study provides a significant summary for IBs, policymakers, regulators, AAOIFI and connected authorities across countries. In addition, the findings linked powers between jurisdictions with recommendations on growing the present AAOIFI practices.

Originality/value

This paper offers an original contribution to the accounting professionals and stakeholders who investigate the relationship between disclosure, performance and governance. It is considered as a basis for future studies in the simultaneous relation between these variables. It is crucial for accounting professionals, researchers and stakeholders interesting in the financial disclosure (FD) in IBs.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Arik Susbiyani, Moh Halim and Animah Animah

This paper aims to examine the effect of the independent board of commissioners and profitability on Islamic social reporting (ISR) disclosure implemented in companies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of the independent board of commissioners and profitability on Islamic social reporting (ISR) disclosure implemented in companies that belong to the group category of Indeks Saham Syariah Indonesia (ISSI). This study also examined the advanced effect of ISR disclosure as a company strategy to obtain a firm’s value.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of the independent board of commissioners, profitability, ISR disclosure and firm’s value were obtained from the annual reports of companies whose shares belong to the calculation of ISSI, totaling 24 companies. The ISR disclosure was measured using the content analysis method. While the research model used path analysis.

Findings

This study found that the independent board of commissioners directly affects the ISR disclosure while indirectly affects the firm’s value as mediated by the ISR disclosure. This finding indicates that the independent board of commissioners is regarded as capable of protecting investors’ interests from problems that may be incurred from asymmetry information. However, this study failed to prove that profitability directly affects the ISR disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

A list of ISR disclosure items in this research adopted the list developed by Haniffa and Othman, without any additional items. While the measurement of ISR disclosure used the content analysis, therefore there may be subjectivity issues accidentally done while scoring.

Practical implications

This study recommends management of companies which belong to ISSI to optimize their independent board of commissioners because it has been proven in this study that their presence can significantly encourage a more independent, objective and fair climate while one of its main principles is to pay attention to the interests of minority shareholders and other stakeholders. Besides, the findings can be used to increase awareness of the company management about the importance of transparency in managing a company because the ISR disclosure has received positive responses from investors.

Social implications

The findings of this study encourage companies to be more transparent in presenting information. An appropriate disclosure will provide a sense of security so that the investors can account for such earthly issues before Allah SWT, thus their spiritual satisfaction can be achieved.

Originality/value

This paper investigated further the effect of ISR disclosure on firm’s value which has never been performed by previous scholars. The ISR disclosure is a strategy to obtain legitimacy from investors, which was analyzed using the legitimacy theory.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Anne Marie Gosselin and Sylvie Berthelot

The purpose of this study is twofold: to examine the reliability of voluntary corporate social responsibility reporting (CSRR) to determine whether users can rely on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: to examine the reliability of voluntary corporate social responsibility reporting (CSRR) to determine whether users can rely on the information released by corporations and to examine the determinants of CSRR reliability in a voluntary context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses the information included in a sample of 190 standalone corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports issued by Canadian corporations listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange S&P/TSX Composite Index from 2016 to 2018.

Findings

The results of this study show that CSR reports lack reliability. The determinants identified (image, corporate governance and financialisation) partially explain the quality of the information disclosed. As well, the results suggest that corporations may attempt to manipulate users’ perception through their disclosures.

Practical implications

TThis study provides a greater understanding of the current state of CSRR in a voluntary context. It offers further insights into the strategies corporations use to manage impressions through CSR disclosures.

Social implications

This study provides further empirical data as to current shortcomings of voluntary CSRR and the potential benefits of further regulation.

Originality/value

Few studies have specifically focused on the reliability of CSRR and its determinants in a voluntary context.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Kofi Mintah Oware, Kingsley Appiah and Thomas Adomah Worae

The study aims to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure does improve debt financing of listed firms with sustainable development agendas coupled…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure does improve debt financing of listed firms with sustainable development agendas coupled with high chief executive officer (CEO) tenure in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing panel regression based on fixed effect and instrumental variable regression with fixed effect assumptions, the study examined data from the Bombay stock exchange from the period 2010 to 2019.

Findings

The study demonstrates that the disclosure of current exchange capital and moral capital cannot cause a firm to access short-term and long-term debt financing. However, lag investment in moral capital causes a positive effect on short-term debt financing. The second findings show that CEO tenure has a positive and statistically significant association with short-term debt financing and an insignificant association with long-term debt financing. The third findings show that the interaction of current CSR disclosure (moral and exchange capital) and CEO tenure is insignificant in affecting short-term and long-term debt finance. However, the interaction of lag CSR disclosure (moral and exchange capital) and CEO tenure positively affect short-term debt financing. The study addresses any endogeneity concerns arising from the CSR disclosure-debt financing association.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a single country to examine the inter-relationship between CEO tenure and debt financing and CSR measured by moral capital and exchange capital, thereby limiting the study's results for generalisation.

Practical implications

The observation is that moral capital investment and disclosure do not guarantee new entrants the chance to access debt financing, but subsequent and lag CSR disclosure ensures access.

Originality/value

No studies examine morality from CSR disclosure on debt financing. This study shows that decoupling CSR into exchange capital and moral capital in accessing debt financing presents new inputs for scholarly debate on CSR.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Zhengqi Guo, Matthew Hall and Leona Wiegmann

This study aims to examine whether and how voluntary accounting disclosures can repair individual donors’ trust in a charity after negative events.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether and how voluntary accounting disclosures can repair individual donors’ trust in a charity after negative events.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a qualitative research approach and conduct 32 semi-structured interviews with active Australian individual donors, with a hypothetical vignette design. Hypothetical negative events and corresponding accounting disclosures are presented to participants during interviews.

Findings

Three types of individual donors are identified based on their decision-making patterns after negative events and primary trust relations with a charity-reasoned donor (giving-decision based on their analysis of the situation, competence-based trust), generalist donors (giving-decision based on trust in the charitable sector, institution-based trust) and emotional donors (giving-decision based on feelings and emotions about the charity, integrity-based trust). The research suggests that accounting disclosures can repair trust damage for reasoned donors and support institution-based trust for generalist donors, but do not seem able to repair trust damage for emotional donors and can potentially damage trust further.

Practical implications

Overall, the findings suggest that a one-size-fits-all approach to communicating with individual donors after negative events is not likely to be very effective in repairing trust. Instead, charities may need to adapt disclosures to their different types of individual donors.

Originality/value

While prior accounting studies have largely focussed on how charity managers themselves grapple with accountability or how negative events impact charitable donations, the authors demonstrate how accounting disclosures can play different roles in the trust-repairing process for different types of individual donors.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Cheryl K. McIntosh, Shelia A. Hyde, Myrtle P. Bell and Paul E. Yeatts

The purpose of this study is to examine factors relating to the decision to proactively disclose a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine factors relating to the decision to proactively disclose a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a concealable stigmatized identity, before experiencing performance issues at work. These factors include stigma consciousness, psychological safety, and job demands. Proactive disclosure is also measured in relation to thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through the online research platform Prolific. Variables of interest were measured using surveys of 166 working adults who have ADHD. Path analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors hypothesized that stigma consciousness is negatively related to proactive disclosure of ADHD at work and that psychological safety and job demands are positively related to it. The authors further hypothesized that proactive disclosure mediates the relationship between these variables and thriving at work. The results partially support these hypotheses, indicating that stigma consciousness is negatively related to proactive disclosure while psychological safety is positively related. Proactive disclosure fully mediates the relationship between stigma consciousness and thriving and partially mediates the relationship between psychological safety and thriving. Job demands relate to thriving but are not significantly related to proactive disclosure.

Practical implications

Organizations can help employees who have concealable disabilities to proactively disclose them and thrive by providing a psychologically safe environment where disabilities are not stigmatized.

Originality/value

This study diverges from previous studies by measuring positive contextual and individual factors that help employees who have ADHD to thrive in the workplace. A proactive disclosure scale is developed and validated.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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