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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Mitsuaki Furukawa and Junichiro Takahata

The purpose of this paper is to analyze late disbursements for service delivery by focusing on donors’ General Budget Support disbursement to Tanzania and on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze late disbursements for service delivery by focusing on donors’ General Budget Support disbursement to Tanzania and on the intergovernmental money flows in Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined empirical analysis using statistics of intergovernmental transfers in Tanzania.

Findings

This paper shows that such center-local transfers are significantly correlated with the timing of local government expenditures in general and health expenditures in particular. It also shows that development expenditures are more affected than recurrent expenditures by delays in the transfer.

Practical implications

In order to improve service delivery on the ground, the transfers from donors to the central government and from the central government to local governments need to be timely.

Originality/value

The authors examined empirical analysis using statistics of intergovernmental transfers in Tanzania so as to see whether timing of transfers matters or not, which has not been considered thus far.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Rohan Samarajiva and Gayani Hurulle

Many governments wishing to provide telecommunication services to those who are unconnected have chosen the Universal Service Fund (USF) as the principal policy…

Abstract

Purpose

Many governments wishing to provide telecommunication services to those who are unconnected have chosen the Universal Service Fund (USF) as the principal policy instrument. However, there is evidence that monies directly or indirectly collected from users of telecommunication services are lying unspent in these funds. The purpose of this paper is to propose metrics for measuring the disbursement efficacy of funds across time and across countries as an essential element of improving the performance of the universal service funds.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes two metrics, the total disbursement rate (TDR) and the year-on-year disbursement rate (YDR), which can be used to assess the disbursement efficacy of universal service programs. It illustrates the value of the metrics by applying them to the USFs of India, Malaysia and Pakistan.

Findings

A move to push out funds has been observed in India in recent years. Pakistan had not reached the same momentum up to mid-2014. An improvement in Malaysia’s disbursement efficacy was observed until 2013, with nearly all of the funds collected in the previous year being disbursed. A significant proportion of the funds collected are lying unspent in the three USFs, nevertheless.

Originality/value

The proposed metrics are robust, objective and parsimonious indicators that allow comparison over time and across countries. They will enable productive, evidence-based conversations that will hold fund administrators accountable and will inform the design and implementation of more effective policy mechanisms.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Amy Beech, Do Won Kwak and Kam Ki Tang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interdependence between donor countries’ health aid expenditures. The specific form of interdependence considered is the leader…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interdependence between donor countries’ health aid expenditures. The specific form of interdependence considered is the leader effect, whereby an influential country has a positive leverage effect on other donor countries’ aid expenditure. The opposite case of a free-rider effect, whereby a single donor country has a negative leverage effect on its peers, is also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on the identification of the leader effect avoids the estimation bias present in the identification of the peer group effect, due to endogenous social effect. The empirical analysis focuses on Development Assistance for Health provided by 20 OECD countries over the period of 1990-2009. Aid commitment and aid disbursement are distinguished.

Findings

When aid dynamics, country heterogeneity, and endogeneity are accounted for, there is no evidence that the biggest donor – the USA, or the most generous donors – Norway and Sweden, exhibit any leverage effects on other donor countries’ aid expenditures.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the leader and free-rider effects in health aid provision as previous studies focus on peer effects. Any evidence of leader or free-rider effects (or the lack of it) adds to the understanding of international political economy especially in the area of foreign aid provision.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2018

Hairul Suhaimi Nahar

This paper aims to fill the noticeably fragmented zakat literature repertoire by empirically exploring stakeholders’ views toward zakat management performance issues based…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to fill the noticeably fragmented zakat literature repertoire by empirically exploring stakeholders’ views toward zakat management performance issues based on a selected zakat institution (ZI) operating on a corporatized platform with corporate administrative style.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach using a questionnaire survey distributed to Muslims in the State which ZI is operating was adopted. A total of 448 usable responses are used in the analysis covering descriptive and mean difference.

Findings

The results indicate that managerial reform configuration in terms of corporatization has been viewed positively by stakeholders, translated into a comforting agreement score toward ZI’s improved management performance (collection, disbursement and reporting). Such perceptions are, however, observably sensitive to demographic factors of gender and employment type. The survey also document evidence that the corporatization exercise itself had improved respondents’ confidence toward ZI being the zakat administrator in the State.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the public policy debate with respect to corporatized ZI’s management performance from the stakeholders’ perspective. The results are arguably informative at various levels, forming a basis for reality check and policy inputs for various stakeholders, including (but not limited to) the ZI itself, zakat payers and asnafs, particularly in designing relevant and necessary administrative strategies and relevant policy formulation in addressing the performance and accountability issues in ZIs.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Anthony R. Bowrin

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it describes the nature of internal controls (IC) in Christian and Hindu religious organizations (ROs) in Trinidad and Tobago…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it describes the nature of internal controls (IC) in Christian and Hindu religious organizations (ROs) in Trinidad and Tobago. Second, the paper provides an assessment of the relative comprehensiveness of IC among the ROs examined and offers tentative explanations for the findings. Most of the information used in the paper was collected by conducting structured interviews with the chief financial officer(s) of each RO. This information was supplemented by published studies. The findings indicate that the ROs as a group have inadequate and patchy IC systems. Conversely, all the ROs examined had implemented many of the basic foundational elements of an effective IC system. This suggests that they could significantly improve the quality of their IC systems by instituting some fairly minor and cheap practices. The implications of these findings for administrators and researchers of ROs are discussed.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Brant K. Brown, James E. Anderson, P. Georgia Bullitt and Amelia A. Cottrell

To explain two new Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) rule provisions, effective February 5, 2018, that were designed to provide firms with more effective…

Abstract

Purpose

To explain two new Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) rule provisions, effective February 5, 2018, that were designed to provide firms with more effective tools to address suspected financial exploitation of seniors and other vulnerable adults, a new Rule 2165, Financial Exploitation of Specified Adults, and an amended Rule 4512, the “Trusted Contact Person” amendment.

Design/methodology/approach

Mentions FINRA’s and US Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC’s) longstanding concern about schemes targeting the financial assets of seniors. Provides an overview of the rule changes, including the safe harbor under Rule 2165, which specifies the conditions under which it is permissible for a firm to place a temporary hold on a disbursement, the obligations generated by the decision to place such a temporary hold, and the requirement under amended Rule 4512 for a firm to make reasonable efforts to obtain the name and contact information of a Trusted Contact Person (TCP) for each non-institutional customer’s account.

Findings

The new FINRA rule provisions create obligations for firms and also provide firms with optional additional tools to address potential financial exploitation of certain customers.

Practical implications

Firms should be mindful that they must develop appropriate procedures, controls, and training around the authority to place a temporary hold on a customer disbursement.

Originality/value

This article contains valuable information about recent FINRA rule changes and practical guidance from experienced securities lawyers.

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Nabilah Rozzani, Intan Salwani Mohamed and Sharifah Norzehan Syed Yusuf

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of a mobile network system for an Islamic microfinance institution, made in collaboration with a commercial bank…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of a mobile network system for an Islamic microfinance institution, made in collaboration with a commercial bank in Malaysia. It also intends to highlight any emerging issues pertaining to the implementation of technology into the disbursement and repayment system of an Islamic microfinance institution from their clients’ perspectives. As Islamic microfinance industry is still growing in Malaysia, findings gathered throughout the course of study are also intended to boost further knowledge relating to this area.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a case study method, interview sessions were conducted separately with clients of the Islamic microfinance institution. The purpose of interview sessions is to identify the benefits and problem that surrounds the usage of mobile banking into the repayment system for Islamic microfinance products. Data triangulation with various public documents was conducted to enhance the credibility and reliability of data, also to support the claims that were made by the respondents.

Findings

It was found that clients are quite satisfied with the disbursement process through a mobile solution. However, the same cannot be said with the repayment process. The difficulties in using the mobile solution pose a major threat to its success. As most clients are not born to be technological savvy, the lack of easiness in methods for the usage of a mobile solution for their transactions pushes them away from further exploring the benefits that can be brought in by the function. Other risks which were highlighted include concerns towards breach of trust and risks of robbery. Clients of the case study, on the other hand, are concerned that the transfer of cash between their meeting venues to the bank would expose them to the public who might try to take advantage from the situation.

Research limitations/implications

As the current study had only focusses on mobile banking aspect of the repayment system for one Islamic microfinance institution, a multiple case study could be adapted to investigate various banking channels being implemented by different Islamic microfinance institutions in Malaysia and their current success.

Practical implications

By highlighting several issues through this study, it is hoped that this Islamic microfinance institution would consider applying other means of payment that are available in the market that is not only cost-efficient, but also beneficial for clients of the institution.

Originality/value

This study highlights the setbacks in the usage of technology by clients of Islamic microfinance institution in Malaysia. Although many approved to the diffusion of innovation in Malaysian banking sector, the same has yet to be achieved in the Islamic microfinance industry, which clients are mostly technology illiterate.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Executive summary
Publication date: 13 January 2020

THAILAND: Government seeks quick budget disbursement

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES249947

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Tchekpo Fortune Ogouvide, Ygue Patrice Adegbola, Roch Cedrique Zossou, Afio Zannou and Gauthier Biaou

This document analyses farmers' preferences and willingness to pay (CAP) for microcredit, in order to facilitate their access in rural areas.

Abstract

Purpose

This document analyses farmers' preferences and willingness to pay (CAP) for microcredit, in order to facilitate their access in rural areas.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are based on a discrete choice experiment with 400 randomly selected farmers from 20 villages of the 7 Benin agricultural development hubs (ADHs). The preference choice modelling was performed using mixed logit (MXL) and latent class logit (LCL) models. Farmers' willingness to pay for each preferred attribute was estimated. The endogenous attribute attendance (EAA) model was also used to capture attribute non-attendance (ANA) phenomenon.

Findings

The results indicate that, on average, farmers prefer individual loans, low interest rates, in kind + cash loans, cash loans, disbursement before planting and loans with at least 10-month duration. These preferences vary according to farmers' classes. Farmers are willing to pay higher or lower interest rates depending on attribute importance. The estimate of the EAA model indicates that, when taking the ANA phenomenon into consideration, people will show stronger attitudes regarding WTP for important factors.

Research limitations/implications

Based on these results from Benin, microfinance institutions (MFIs) in developing countries can, based on the interest rates currently charged, attract more farmers as customers, reviewing the combination of the levels of the attributes associated with the nature of the loan, the type of loan (individual or collective), the disbursement period of funds, the waiting period of the loan and the loan duration. However, the study only considered production credit, ignoring equipment or investment credit.

Practical implications

The document provides information on the key factors that can facilitate producers' access to MFI products and services.

Social implications

Facilitating small farmers' access to financial service will contribute to poverty reduction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the knowledge of the attributes and attribute levels favoured by farmers when choosing financial products and the amounts they agree to pay for these attributes. The implementation of the results would facilitate small producers' access to financial services; thus contributing to poverty reduction.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 80 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Peter A. Chew and David G. Robinson

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how methods from statistics, natural language processing, information theory, and other scientific fields can be brought…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate how methods from statistics, natural language processing, information theory, and other scientific fields can be brought to bear on account reconciliation. Practically, the goal is to reduce the number of labor hours it takes to complete a task which is widespread in various subfields of accounting including fraud investigation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors explore novel applications of data mining techniques from natural language processing and statistics to a particular account reconciliation problem. The authors are careful to avoid ad hoc heuristics and instead work with techniques that are theoretically justifiable; this means the techniques should be extensible (subject to appropriate modifications) to problem variants other than those that are explicitly considered here. The authors evaluate their techniques based on precision and recall – standard measures from the field of information retrieval.

Findings

The paper finds that with careful tuning, it is possible to achieve near 100 percent precision (suggesting that the technique is highly accurate compared with an expert human reconciliation clerk) and close to 100 percent recall.

Originality/value

The current approach, unlike many previous approaches, looks to general principles of information theory rather than relying on heuristics which may work for one problem but not another. This approach is therefore highly general, and would apply to virtually any kind of accounting data (including even data where transaction descriptions are in a language other than English).

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

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