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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Mendiola Teng-Calleja, Pinky Rose Sabile and Angelique Pearl Virtue Villasanta

This chapter describes the environmental risks and vulnerabilities faced by work organizations in Southeast Asia. It also presents cases that demonstrate how these…

Abstract

This chapter describes the environmental risks and vulnerabilities faced by work organizations in Southeast Asia. It also presents cases that demonstrate how these organizations respond to disasters and natural hazards. To situate the case discussions, a review of existing studies of organizational resilience, particularly those that propose definitions, models, and frameworks is presented. The cases from the Philippines and Thailand illustrate how active and integrative efforts at building resilience can be institutionalized at the organizational level.

Details

Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery from Disasters: Perspectives from Southeast Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-791-1

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Building Resilient Urban Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-906-5

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Arvind Upadhyay and Amporn Sa-ngiamwibool

This study aims to characterize the main research areas of published works, identify the disciplines that associated with the works and propose research agendas for future…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to characterize the main research areas of published works, identify the disciplines that associated with the works and propose research agendas for future inquiries, based on a systematic literature review that encompasses 89 research papers from 2010 to 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

This review commenced with the definition of the three research questions, and subsequently three steps were followed: (1) defining criteria for research paper selection; (2) specifying the data bases and selecting the papers based on the criteria and (3) data analysis, conclusion and discussion of selected papers. The search was limited to the selection of research papers in English, focusing on “community disaster resilience” which is the subject of this review and referred to as keywords which were used for the online search for papers. All these three words must be present in the title of the selected papers.

Findings

The area “resilience management” and “disaster resilience assessment” accounted for 43% of the studies, and it indicates that research has emphasized the description of how community disaster resilience has been managed and assessed. Three disciplines relating to disaster resilience are disaster risk science, public health and environment, and it indicates that research has fostered core areas of community disaster resilience. Three key research agenda include a growing trend to describe successful efforts to avert a potentially catastrophic disaster through solution-based case studies; a paradigmatic shift and implementation of how communities could help the disaster victims recuperate from disasters.

Research limitations/implications

This review is limited to the numbers of chosen papers, as only full papers were chosen. However, in order to establish more rigorous and inclusive results of the study, the numbers of citations of published papers to be chosen for future inquiry should be taken into account.

Originality/value

This present review originally investigated how the concept of disaster resilience has been applied at the community level and in related areas. As resilience is a multidisciplinary concept that has been investigated by several different disciplines, such as sustainability, psychology, economy and sociology, this study looked into how disciplines related to community disaster resilience to provide agenda for future inquiries. This study therefore characterized the main research areas of published works, identified the disciplines that associated with the works and proposed a research agenda for future inquiries.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

M.K. Gayadini Imesha Dharmasena, Margalit Toledano and C. Kay Weaver

The paper identifies a role for public relations in disaster management by analysing disaster and communication managers' understanding of community resilience and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper identifies a role for public relations in disaster management by analysing disaster and communication managers' understanding of community resilience and their use of communication in the context of two different cultural environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study comprised 51 in-depth qualitative interviews with disaster managers in Sri Lanka and New Zealand, which were thematically analysed using the software programme NVivo 10.

Findings

The study identified cultural differences in Sri Lanka and New Zealand that impact on how managers' communicate in natural disaster situations. The findings indicated that public relations’ understanding of communities’ cultures, their communication, networking and lobbying skills could further enhance the effectiveness of efforts to build community resilience to disasters.

Research limitations/implications

Nations are complex multicultural realities; the findings cannot be generalized to make claims about how natural disasters are managed in different national contexts.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the unrealized potential of public relations’ expertise in communication, community relations, networking and lobbying to contribute to building community resilience to natural disasters.

Social implications

By supporting efforts to build community resilience to disasters, public relations practitioners can contribute to social well-being in times of catastrophic natural disasters.

Originality/value

The paper adds an innovative perspective to public relations crisis literature by identifying the potential contribution of public relations’ concepts and practices to build community resilience to natural disasters. It demonstrates how sociocultural differences may affect disaster communication strategies.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Mendiola Teng-Calleja, Maria Regina M. Hechanova, Pinky Rose Sabile and Angelique Pearl Virtue P. Villasanta

This study explored the resilience-building initiatives of work organizations using the Johns Hopkins Resistance–Resilience–Recovery Model. It also determined how…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the resilience-building initiatives of work organizations using the Johns Hopkins Resistance–Resilience–Recovery Model. It also determined how resilience-building initiatives increase organizational resilience and promote employee resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed an exploratory sequential mixed-methods approach. In Study 1, resilience-building initiatives of selected work organizations in the Philippines were determined through qualitative research. A survey questionnaire to determine the presence of resistance, resilience and recovery programs in organizations was developed based on the results of this qualitative study. In Study 2, the empirical relations of these initiatives to reported levels of perceived organizational resilience as well as individual employee resilience were determined through a quantitative survey among employees. Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings of the study described resistance, resilience and recovery programs in work organizations. Results also supported the hypothesis that the presence of resilience-building initiatives contributes to organizational resilience, which in turn affects employee resilience.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively low contribution of organization initiatives on organization resilience suggests that other factors may need to be explored. Also, despite using a sequential mixed-method approach, conducting longitudinal studies in future research will provide more robust data on the impact of interventions on resilience.

Practical implications

Management may use the results in identifying initiatives that can increase resilience in their organizations. The tool created may be utilized in gathering data on initiatives and help those in-charge of disaster risk reduction and management build a business case on the importance of investing in resilience-building efforts.

Originality/value

The study identified resilience-building initiatives of work organizations in a country that regularly experiences disasters as well as demonstrated the utility of the Johns Hopkins Model as framework for resilience building in the workplace. A survey questionnaire to determine the presence of resistance, resilience and recovery programs in organizations was developed through the exploratory study (Study 1), and the contributions of these initiatives to resilience of employees and organizations were established in Study 2.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Dae Woong Lee

This study aims to provide an analysis and evaluation of infrastructure resilience, one of the components of disaster resilience, to natural hazards.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide an analysis and evaluation of infrastructure resilience, one of the components of disaster resilience, to natural hazards.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of this study consists of four stages. First, descriptive statistical analyses were carried out on the soft and hard infrastructure resilience and natural hazard index. Second, the spatial data were visualized through the exploratory spatial data analysis to understand the spatial distribution and spatial characteristics of variables of the data. Third, the local indicators of the spatial association method were used to identify areas in clusters where infrastructure resilience is weak. Fourth, comparisons were made between the soft and hard infrastructure resilience and natural hazard index: the level of natural hazard is high but the soft and infrastructure resilience remain very vulnerable to disaster.

Findings

The study found that infrastructure resilience varies from community to community, particularly in the same community, in terms of hard infrastructure and soft infrastructure. In addition, the comparative analysis between infrastructure resilience and disaster risk levels resulted in communities that were likely to suffer greatly in the event of a disaster.

Originality/value

This study is meaningful in that infrastructure resilience of Korean local governments was discussed by dividing them into soft and hard infrastructure and comparing them to natural disaster risk levels. In particular, the comparison with the natural disaster risk level identified local governments that are likely to experience significant damage from the natural disaster, which is meaningful in that it serves as a basis for policy practitioners to actively build infrastructure and respond to disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Suzanne Wilkinson, Alice Yan Chang-Richards, Zulkfli Sapeciay and Seosamh B. Costello

Improving the resilience of the construction sector helps countries recover quicker from crises and can assist with improving community resilience and recovery. This study…

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Abstract

Purpose

Improving the resilience of the construction sector helps countries recover quicker from crises and can assist with improving community resilience and recovery. This study aims to explore ways in which the construction sector might improve its resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examined past disasters and the role construction plays to understand what and how better construction resilience can be built, and the impact this will have on recovery and reconstruction.

Findings

The findings showed that after a crisis, the construction sector is called upon to manage building and infrastructure recovery and reconstruction. Construction organisations are needed by the community, as they provide physical resources, people, materials, logistics, management and technical expertise and rebuilding. To ensure that recovery and reconstruction programs are successfully implemented, it is necessary for the construction sector to be resilient. To achieve improved resilience in the construction industry, disaster resilience management needs to become mainstreamed into construction processes.

Research limitations/implications

Although larger organisations have some preparation to respond to crises, including having emergency or disaster plans, smaller companies struggle to achieve a reasonable level of resilience. It appears that senior management and key people in construction organisations are familiar with the procedures but that the majority of staff in organisations lack knowledge and skills.

Practical implications

Understanding the role the construction sector plays in disasters and providing directions for improving construction sector resilience will ultimately improve recovery and reconstruction outcomes.

Social Implications

This paper discusses how communities rely on services provided by construction organisations to enable them to recover from emergencies and crises. Pre-disaster construction company resilience impacts on the ability of construction companies to function post-disaster.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on a number of cases and shows where and how the construction sector has worked in disasters and provides a new analysis of the role the industry plays, and the various disaster stages where the industry has maximum impact.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Kirstin Scholten, Pamela Sharkey Scott and Brian Fynes

This study aims to combine theory and practice to develop an integrated supply chain resilience framework by investigating the inter-dependencies between the strategic…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to combine theory and practice to develop an integrated supply chain resilience framework by investigating the inter-dependencies between the strategic literature based concept of supply chain resilience and operational practitioner based disaster management processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising an in-depth qualitative case of a collaborative agency, this study identifies best practices within disaster management for insights on the operationalisation of supply chain resilience.

Findings

The empirical data leads to the development of an integrated supply chain resilience framework capturing the interplay of disaster management processes and capabilities required to build supply chain resilience. The critical importance of mitigation processes in building supply chain resilience is highlighted.

Practical implications

The generic supply chain resilience framework represents a valuable guide for managers when directing resources and planning for building the capabilities required in each phase of disaster management, while remaining strategically focused. The value of the framework is demonstrated by a retrospective analysis of aid operations in response to Hurricane Katrina.

Originality/value

The study's results are the first to bridge theory and practice on supply chain resilience. By utilising the unique humanitarian aid disaster supply chain management context, a two-way knowledge and learning flow between humanitarian and commercial organisations is established.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Shihui Feng, Liaquat Hossain and Douglas Paton

Disaster education is considered as a newly emerging area of research and practice, which promotes community-based educational approaches for building resilience. Given…

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Abstract

Purpose

Disaster education is considered as a newly emerging area of research and practice, which promotes community-based educational approaches for building resilience. Given the atypical nature of these disturbances, people and communities need to develop the knowledge required to anticipate and understand what they could have to contend with and proactively develop strategies that can minimize their risk and afford ways to cope with and adapt to adverse situations in an effective manner. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that informal education resulting from daily activities related to work, family life, or leisure can be harnessed to develop disaster resilience within community settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper provides the discussion and synthesis of literature covering community resilience, disaster risk reduction (DRR) and informal education. In doing so, this study proposes a conceptual framework and implementation strategies for harnessing informal education in building community resilience.

Findings

To harness informal disaster education for community resilience, the authors suggest a conceptual framework and four implementation strategies with the corresponding implications: cultivate social environment for conversations, discussions, reflections and learning; design social activities for promoting and encouraging informal learning; appropriate interventions by informal educators in social activities; and transparent resources and channels for information and social supports. A compilation of a number of community-based DRR practices involving civil society organizations has been incorporated in the proposed framework for exemplifying informal disaster education for community resilience.

Originality/value

Promoting informal education in community settings is aimed at building community resilience in a collective way, which is especially important in disaster-prone areas. Informal education for community resilience not only educates individuals how to deal with disasters, but also connects individuals together to be more resilient in their ability to cope or bounce back from adverse events in their life.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

A.M. Aslam Saja, Melissa Teo, Ashantha Goonetilleke, A.M. Ziyath and Jagath Gunatilake

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for evaluation and ranking of potential surrogates to select the optimum surrogates and test it for five selected…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for evaluation and ranking of potential surrogates to select the optimum surrogates and test it for five selected social resilience indicators in a disaster context. Innovative resilience assessment approaches are required to capture key facets of resilience indicators to deepen the understanding of social resilience. Surrogates can adequately represent the target indicator that is difficult to measure, as surrogates are defined as key facets of a target indicator.

Design/methodology/approach

To optimize the selection of surrogates, five key evaluation criteria were used. Disaster management experts completed an online survey questionnaire and evaluated three potential surrogate options. Surrogates were then ranked using PROMETHEE, a multi-experts multi-criteria group decision analysis technique.

Findings

A framework was devised to evaluate and rank potential surrogates to assess social resilience in a disaster context. The findings revealed that the first ranked surrogate can be the most critical facet of a resilience indicator of measure. In most instances, highly experienced cohort of practitioners and policy makers have aligned their preferences of surrogates with the overall ranking of surrogates obtained in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The surrogate approach can also be tested in different disaster and geographic contexts. The resilience indicators used in this study to explore surrogates are largely applicable in all contexts. However, the preference of surrogates may also vary in different contexts.

Practical implications

Once the surrogate is selected through an evaluation process proposed in this paper, the resilience status can be updated regularly with the help of the selected surrogate. The first ranked surrogate for each of the social resilience indicator can be applied, since the findings revealed that the first ranked surrogate can be the most critical facet in the context of the social resilience indicator being measured.

Social implications

The framework and the selection of optimal surrogates will assist to overcome the conceptual and methodical challenges of social resilience assessment. The applicability of selected surrogates by practitioners and policymakers in disaster management will play a vital role in resilience investment decision-making at the community level.

Originality/value

The surrogate approach has been used in the fields of ecology and clinical medicine to overcome the challenges in measuring difficult to measure indicators. The use of surrogates in this study to measure social resilience indicators in a disaster context is innovative, which was not yet explored in resilience measurement in disaster management.

Graphical abstract

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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