Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Emilia Grass and Kathrin Fischer

The purpose of this work is the development of a structured case study design process for developing case studies in humanitarian logistics, in particular for short-term…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work is the development of a structured case study design process for developing case studies in humanitarian logistics, in particular for short-term predictable disaster situations like floods and hurricanes. Moreover, useful public sources are presented in order to enable researchers to find relevant data for their case studies more easily.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured framework for case study design is set up, splitting the process into different steps and phases.

Findings

The framework is applied to an illustrative example, where case studies with different numbers and levels of detail of scenarios are designed based on the three-day forecast for hurricane Harvey in 2017. The corresponding solutions demonstrate the relevance of using as much forecast information as possible in case study building, and in particular in scenario design, in order to get useful and appropriate results.

Research limitations/implications

The case study design process is mostly suitable for short-term predictable disasters, but can also be adapted to other types of disasters. The process has been applied to one specific hurricane here which serves as an example.

Practical implications

Also for practitioners, the results of this work are highly relevant, as constructing realistic cases using real data will lead to more useful results. Moreover, it is taken into account in the case study design process that relief agencies are regularly confronted with disasters in certain areas and hence need to define the basic planning situation and parameters “once and for all” and on a long-term basis, whereas disaster specific data from forecasts are only available within a short time frame.

Originality/value

The new design process can be applied by researchers as well as practitioners, and the publicly available data sources will be useful to the community.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Susan E. Parker

The Morgan Library at Colorado State University in Fort Collins suffered catastrophic flooding as the result of a historic rain storm and flood that swept through the town…

Abstract

The Morgan Library at Colorado State University in Fort Collins suffered catastrophic flooding as the result of a historic rain storm and flood that swept through the town on July 28, 1997. This study examines this single library's organizational disaster response and identifies the phenomena that the library's employees cited as their motivation for innovation.

Purpose – This study provides an example of a library where a pre-disaster and post-disaster organizational environment was supportive of experimentation. This influenced the employees’ capacity and motivation to create a new tool meant to solve a temporary need. Their invention, a service now called RapidILL, advanced the Morgan Library organization beyond disaster recovery and has become an effective and popular consortium of libraries.

Design/methodology/approach – This is an instrumental case study. This design was chosen to examine the issues in organizational learning that the single case of Morgan Library presents. The researcher interviewed employees who survived the 1997 flood and who worked in the library after the disaster. The interview results and a book written by staff members are the most important data that form the basis for this qualitative research.

The interviews were transcribed, and key phrases and information from both the interviews and the published book were isolated into themes for coding. The coding allowed the use of NVivo 7, a text analysis software, to search in employees’ stories for “feeling” words and themes about change, innovation, motivation, and mental models.

Three research questions for the study sought to learn how employees described their lived experience, how the disaster altered their mental models of change, and what factors in the disaster response experience promoted learning and innovation.

Findings – This study investigates how the disruptive forces of disaster can influence and promote organizational learning and foster innovation. Analysis of the data demonstrates how the library employees’ feelings of trust before and following a workplace disaster shifted their mental models of change. They felt empowered to act and assert their own ideas; they did not simply react to change acting upon them.

Emotions motivate adaptive actions, facilitating change. The library employees’ lived experiences and feelings influenced what they learned, how quickly they learned it, and how that learning contributed to their innovations after the disaster. The library's supervisory and administrative leaders encouraged staff members to try out new ideas. This approach invigorated staff members’ feelings of trust and motivated them to contribute their efforts and ideas. Feeling free to experiment, they tapped their creativity and provided adaptations and innovations.

Practical implications – A disaster imposes immediate and often unanticipated change upon people and organizations. A disaster response urgently demands that employees do things differently; it also may require that employees do different things.

Successful organizations must become adept at creating and implementing changes to remain relevant and effective in the environments in which they operate. They need to ensure that employees generate and test as many ideas as possible in order to maximize the opportunity to uncover the best new thinking. This applies to libraries as well as to any other organizations.

If library leaders understand the conditions under which employees are most motivated to let go of fear and alter the mental models they use to interpret their work world, it should be possible and desirable to re-create those conditions and improve the ability of their organizations to tap into employees’ talent, spur innovation, and generate meaningful change.

Social implications – Trust and opportunities for learning can be central to employees’ ability to embrace change as a positive state in which their creativity flourishes and contributes to the success of the organization. When leaders support experimentation, employees utilize and value their affective connections as much as their professional knowledge. Work environments that promote experimentation and trust are ones in which employees at any rank feel secure enough to propose and experiment with innovative services, products, or workflows.

Originality/value – The first of its kind to examine library organizations, this study offers direct evidence to show that organizational learning and progress flourish through a combination of positive affective experiences and experimentation. The study shows how mental models, organizational learning, and innovation may help employees create significantly effective organizational advances while under duress.

An original formula is presented in Fig. 1.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-313-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Elizabeth Jordan, Amy Javernick-Will and Bernard Amadei

The purpose of this research is to examine why communities facing the same disaster recover differentially and determine pathways to successful disaster recovery in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine why communities facing the same disaster recover differentially and determine pathways to successful disaster recovery in the research setting of New Orleans neighborhoods affected by Hurricane Katrina. While previous studies suggest that there are a variety of pathways to recovery, a broader cross-case comparison is necessary to generalize these pathways into a recovery framework. Specifically, this study seeks to determine what pre-disaster and post-disaster causal factors, alone or in combination, were important to recovery following Hurricane Katrina.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a cross-case comparative study of neighborhood-level recovery. Based on prior work, which used the Delphi method to determine hypothesized causal factors and indicators of recovery, data was collected through publically available sources, including the US Census, the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center and previously completed studies for 18 damaged neighborhoods. Fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis was used due to its ability to analyze both quantitative and qualitative data for smaller case studies.

Findings

The results show that there are multiple pathways combining pre-disaster community factors and post-disaster actions that led to recovery, as measured by population return. For example, economic capacity is nearly sufficient for recovery, but a combination of low social vulnerability, post-disaster community participation, a high proportion of pre-World War II housing stock and high amounts of post-disaster funds also led to recovery.

Originality/value

This research uses a novel method to link pre-disaster measures of resilience and vulnerability to recovery outcomes and, through cross-case comparison, generates results that will enable researchers to develop a theory of sustainable community recovery.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Vivake Anand, Kinza Yousfani and Jianhua Zhang

Natural disasters occur all around the world, in the last two decades these natural disasters have brought sever damages to the world economy. Mostly developing countries…

Abstract

Natural disasters occur all around the world, in the last two decades these natural disasters have brought sever damages to the world economy. Mostly developing countries bear severe consequences due to these natural disasters. In July 2010, Pakistan faced a massive flood, which affected almost all the countries. The disaster affected all sectors like daily life, transportation, infrastructure, etc., of the country. GOP did not have enough resources to cope with this giant disaster and called for international help. Local and international NGOs participated with GOP in the early phases of recovery. Millions of dollars were given away as the initial impact of this disaster, and GOP and other relief agents have spent other million to provide initial recovery and relief. GOP will need billions of dollars further to continue recovery from the disaster of 2010.

Details

International Case Studies in the Management of Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-187-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Brenda Cardoso, Tharcisio Fontainha, Adriana Leiras and Patricia Alcantara Cardoso

This paper aims to identify the main performance criteria for Humanitarian Operations (HOs) from the beneficiary perspective and to propose a taxonomy to support the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the main performance criteria for Humanitarian Operations (HOs) from the beneficiary perspective and to propose a taxonomy to support the evaluation of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducts a Systematic Literature Review to identify the main criteria in HOs from the beneficiary's view. Also, we conduct an empirical study based on a survey and a case study to validate the findings in a real-life setting.

Findings

Considering 25 papers, the identified performance criteria were divided into six categories: health, housing, education, socioeconomic factors, care and risk and disaster management. The empirical discussion considered forty-four responses from beneficiaries, and the main criteria complained about were related to socioeconomic factors. In addition, a case study was developed that examines the perspective of the company responsible for the construction of the building to aid in understanding the areas of dissatisfaction noted by the residents.

Practical implications

The research contributes organized criteria to support the performance evaluation of organizations. It offers a structured basis for further discussion among academics and professionals about other performance evaluation topics, such as dashboards and the integration of indicators from different stakeholders.

Originality/value

Literature is scarce in questions of performance evaluation in HOs and the analysis of the beneficiary as the main client. Therefore, the paper contributes to both areas by evaluating HOs from the beneficiary's perspective.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Akbar Adhiutama, Rony Darmawan, Shimaditya Nuraeni, Noorhan Firdaus Pambudi and Nur Budi Mulyono

The lack of studies about the relevance of disaster awareness factors and disaster evacuation as a part of disaster responses especially for fire cases in an academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The lack of studies about the relevance of disaster awareness factors and disaster evacuation as a part of disaster responses especially for fire cases in an academic environment in Indonesia has triggered this study to explore the disaster awareness factors and evacuation experiment without emergency alarm for case study students in the classroom. The relevance of disaster awareness factors in transforming into practical action and decision in a disaster evacuation need to be examined to study the relevance of both phases in disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conducted a quantitative approach by studying questionnaires from 162 respondents collectively divided into five groups to examine the student disaster awareness factors randomly from those groups. The qualitative approach was implemented through the evacuation experiments that were conducted twice to analyze the disaster evacuation performance. The analysis for the relevance is conducted by comparing the result of the questionnaire study and the evacuation experiment.

Findings

According to the questionnaire study, generally, the students are highly confident with their hazard knowledge in disaster awareness except that half of them are doubtful about appropriate steps in a disaster. The experiment without explosive sound showed that they have slower responses in the critical moment of evacuation. The response in the experiments showed relevance with several disaster awareness factors

Research limitations/implications

This study has explored the relevance of disaster awareness factors with disaster response in a campus building. In the part of reducing risk during fire disaster, this research shows the importance of social interaction and hazard knowledge during the disaster.

Practical implications

The improvement of disaster evacuation procedures and training in a campus building is mandatory to reduce disaster risk based on the relevance of disaster awareness factors and disaster response in this study.

Originality/value

This study measures the relevance of disaster awareness factors performance of the students by comparing it to their actions and decisions in an experimental setting of fire building. The disaster awareness factor performance was measured by a questionnaire survey while the experiments were deployed to observe the performance of their actions and decisions during evacuation as part of the disaster response phase.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Fitri Rahmafitria, Vidi Sukmayadi, Karim Suryadi and Arief Rosyidie

This paper attempts to evaluate the current collaborative model of disaster management initiated by the Indonesian Government at the regional level. The paper aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to evaluate the current collaborative model of disaster management initiated by the Indonesian Government at the regional level. The paper aims at providing recommendations for a more functional model of local communities' resilience by promoting the synergy of roles among the community, industry and local government.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the study objective, the authors conducted the qualitative approach. The study used The Hyogo Framework to Action (HFA) 2000–2015 disaster management approach. The HFA approach contains substances of disaster management guidelines on social, economic and environmental aspects, as well as the strategies for implementing the guidelines.

Findings

The study's findings have indicated that substandard institutions can hamper collaborative processes and lower the level of community resilience. A collaborative model can appropriately operate when the formal institution plays its role as the central coordinator and ensures that transparency, decision-making and representation are met. Furthermore, the community and formal educational institutions are essentials as the foundation of building community resilience.

Practical implications

This study was limited to a case study in an Indonesian popular tourist destination. Hence, it could be extended by conducting comparative studies with other destinations in developing countries to explore their disaster management and the government involvement in each respective countries.

Social implications

This study was limited to a case study in an Indonesian popular tourist destination. Hence, it could be extended by conducting comparative studies with other destinations in developing countries to explore their disaster management and government involvement in each respective country.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors propose a novel approach to improve the current disaster management model. The proposed approach focuses on designing an institutional model for tourism destinations' disaster management, where the stakeholders are less-functional in working collaboratively. The study findings suggest that educational institutions and disaster communities must take the mediator role in bridging knowledge transfer among the government, the community and the tourism industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2012

Min Hee Go

Purpose – This study seeks to identify the factors that made Hurricane Katrina the worst disaster in American history. Although the inefficiency of the centralized…

Abstract

Purpose – This study seeks to identify the factors that made Hurricane Katrina the worst disaster in American history. Although the inefficiency of the centralized government is often cited as the primary reason for failure in disaster mitigation and recovery, more fundamental reasons are left unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach – This study points out that comparative case analysis is inadequate to substantiate the claim that private actors are better responders to disaster than public agents. Instead, it takes a single case study approach of hurricane response in New Orleans. This method allows for two things: first, extending the temporal scope helps to understand that disaster management is not a single event but a cumulative result of the past responses. Second, one can trace the interplay between public and private agents rather than their separate reactions.

Findings – A series of legal conditions within the federalist framework have discouraged effective disaster management by the federal government. Using both legal and extralegal means, local actors tried to avoid the federal government's involvement in land use and building control that may prohibit local economic activities. Instead, the federal government was pressured into providing structural protection such as levee construction, which is costly yet ineffective in preventing a mega-disaster like Hurricane Katrina.

Originality/value of paper – This study warrants caution in conducting a comparative case analysis in evaluating the role of the federal government in disaster response and recovery. By conducting an in-depth case study of New Orleans hurricane response over the past 50 years, it reveals that the current government failure stems from structural and legal conditions rather than bureaucratic inefficiency.

Details

Disasters, Hazards and Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-914-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Rizwan Akbar Ali, Sandeeka Mannakkara and Suzanne Wilkinson

This paper aims to describe an in-depth study conducted on transition of recovery into subsequent recovery phases after the 2010 super floods in the Sindh province of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an in-depth study conducted on transition of recovery into subsequent recovery phases after the 2010 super floods in the Sindh province of Pakistan. The objectives of this research were to examine the post-disaster activities after the floods and highlight the critical areas hindering the transition into an effective recovery phase.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach based on literature reviews with semi-structured interviews with disaster management stakeholders were applied as the primary source of data.

Findings

The study found that long-term recovery was the most neglected phase of post-disaster recovery (PDR). The factors hindering successful transition following short-term recovery activities are lack of following: community-level involvement, local administration and community capacity, disaster governance, different stakeholders and coordination, information and knowledge management.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines the long-term disaster recovery after the 2010 super floods in three districts of Sindh. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to investigate the factors in other areas for different types of disasters.

Practical implications

These findings are critical to planning future post-disaster recoveries in the region. It also provides a basis to investigate other types of disasters.

Originality/value

The transition of recovery into long-term phase has never been investigated before. The recovery phase is an opportune time to incorporate strategies for building back better, resilience, mitigation and preparedness. A PDR that does not incorporate these strategies in the long-term leaves affected communities in more vulnerable conditions for future disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Elaine Enarson and Lourdes Meyreles

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of…

Downloads
2767

Abstract

This article provides an introduction and assessment of the English and Spanish literatures on gender relations in disaster contexts. We analyze regional patterns of differences and similarities in women’s disaster experiences and the differing research questions raised by these patterns in the scholarly and practice‐based literature. The analysis supports the claim that how gender is theorized makes a difference in public policy and practical approaches to disaster risk management. We propose new directions in the field of disaster social science and contribute a current bibliography in the emerging gender and disaster field.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000