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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Dewald Van Niekerk

The purpose of the paper is to provide a retrospective assessment of progress in disaster risk governance in Africa against the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) since…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide a retrospective assessment of progress in disaster risk governance in Africa against the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) since 2000. This assessment of progress achieved in disaster risk governance in Africa aims to identify achievements, good practices, gaps and challenges against selected HFA indicators (in particular Priority 1).

Design/methodology/approach

This study mainly followed a qualitative methodology although quantitative data were interpreted to achieve the research objectives. Available literature (scientific articles, research and technical reports) on disaster risk governance was used as primary research data. This research used a selected number of African countries as its basis for analysis (Burundi, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Swaziland and South Africa). By investigating literature on disaster risk governance an analytical framework was developed which guided the assessment of the achievements, good practices, gaps and challenges in implementing disaster risk governance on the African continent since the inception of the HFA in 2005.

Findings

The research found that African countries have been making steady progress in implementing disaster risk governance against theoretical indicators. The continent contains a few international best practices which other nations can learn from. Certain gaps and challenges are, however, still hampering better progress in the reduction of disaster risks. There is the need for multi-layered ownership and understanding of disaster risks and their cross-sectoral nature, with strong community engagement.

Originality/value

An assessment of progress in disaster risk governance in Africa can assist greatly in shaping future international and national policy, legislation and implementation. The research provided input to the Global Assessment Report for 2015 and identified opportunities in disaster risk governance beyond 2015.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Huong Thi Lan Huynh, Hien Xuan Nguyen, Thuy Thi Ngo and Hang Thi Van

Nowadays, under climate change contexts, natural disasters are becoming stronger in intensity and probability. The impacts of natural disasters on people and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays, under climate change contexts, natural disasters are becoming stronger in intensity and probability. The impacts of natural disasters on people and the environment are also getting worse. The purpose of this study was conducted to provide a method of assessing disaster risks, in particular, floods for human life in Mid Central Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The pre-disaster assessment method was used based on the analysis of hazard factors (Hazard-H), exposure to hazards (Exposure-E) and vulnerability (Vulnerability-V).

Findings

Flood disaster risks in the area are assessed and displayed on spatial maps. The districts in coastal plains of Quang Ngai and Thua Thien Hue provinces have the highest levels of risk. These assessments will play an important role in supporting flood prevention and mitigation in the region.

Originality/value

According to the authors, this is the first study assessing the flood risk in Vietnam on the pre-disaster perspective. The assessment provides a plain point of view on natural disaster impacts that supporting disaster prevention services.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Christo Coetzee and Dewald Van Niekerk

The purpose of the paper is to provide a robust and simple methodology for disaster risk management officials to assess the total disaster risk posed by dolomite in urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide a robust and simple methodology for disaster risk management officials to assess the total disaster risk posed by dolomite in urban areas of South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to develop the methodology the basic principles of disaster risk assessment, incapsulated in the notation R=H×V, was applied to provide a vehicle to quantify hazard and vulnerability aspects related to dolomite risk. Specifically existing knowledge on inherent dolomite risk classes (hazard component) was aligned to issues of vulnerability (in this case ageing water infrastructure) to attain a total dolomite disaster risk score for a specific area.

Findings

The results from the practical application of the method indicated that the proposed dolomite risk assessment methodology is not only robust but easy to comprehend and to apply. The simplicity of the method also allows for easy integration into existing urban planning and integrated development planning process.

Originality/value

The creation of the method not only provides a much-needed tool for assessing the total disaster risk posed by dolomite in urban areas but also adds value to the entire urban and community development process.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Gerard A. Finnigan

The rapid deterioration of the earth’s natural ecosystems are increasing the risk of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hydrometeorological hazards are concentrating…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid deterioration of the earth’s natural ecosystems are increasing the risk of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hydrometeorological hazards are concentrating contaminants from the damaged environment and exposing large vulnerable populations to life threating illnesses and death. This study performed a retrospective health risk assessment on two recent events where such impacts unfolded, namely, the 2015 south east Equatorial Asia smoke haze disaster and the 2016 Melbourne thunderstorm asthma epidemic. The purpose of this paper is to test if the characterisation of health risk warranted earlier and more effective risk reduction activities prior to the disasters occurring.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective health risk characterisation assessment was performed combing United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Risk Health Aspect in Disaster Risk Assessment (2017) framework with a thematic and targeted word literature review to identify the level of risk knowledge prior to each event. A risk characterisation matrix was then created to characterise the health risk of each hazard event.

Findings

The 2015 south east Equatorial Asia smoke haze disaster risk assessment was characterised as “extreme” health risk and the 2016 Melbourne thunderstorm asthma epidemic was characterised as “high” health risk.

Practical implications

Reaching the goals of the Sendai Framework require strategies and plans which urgently address the catastrophic level of mortality risk posed by exposure to environmental contaminants.

Originality/value

Innovative approaches and partnerships are necessary to mitigate the risk from the deteriorating health of the environment and natural ecosystems, along with disaster response initiatives that reduce exposure of vulnerable people on a large scale.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Niru Nirupama

Disaster risk and vulnerability assessment depends on various factors such as appropriate theoretical concepts and quality and adequacy of information gathered. Accounting…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster risk and vulnerability assessment depends on various factors such as appropriate theoretical concepts and quality and adequacy of information gathered. Accounting for people's perception and partnering with them in the process leads to deeper understanding of community vulnerability, which in turn provides better assessment of disaster risk. The purpose of this paper is to offer an integrated approach for risk and vulnerability assessment that includes theoretical concept, quantitative risk assessment method, and a component representing people's perception.

Design/methodology/approach

The Pressure and Release (PAR) model framework is used for basic understanding of the progression of vulnerability through identification of root causes such as: limited access to power and resources; dynamic pressures – lack of education, urbanization and demographics; and unsafe conditions such as dangerous locations. To complement PAR, the Access to Resources (ATR) model is used that expands upon the dynamics of changing decisions, options, livelihood opportunities, available resources, and choices made by the population that is impacted by disaster(s) – in time and space. Conventional risk equation: R=H x V provides community risk profile.

Findings

Using a working example, it is demonstrated that risk assessment can have significant influence by introducing an additional component to represent “community perception” in the fundamental risk equation.

Originality/value

The proposed approach: Risk (R) = Hazard (H) x Vulnerability (V) x Community Perception (cp), provides a unique and comprehensive approach to evaluate disaster risk by taking people's perception into account.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Abhilash Panda and Andrew Bower

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the place of cyber security risk in the framework of global commitments adopted in 2015 to reduce disaster risks in an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the place of cyber security risk in the framework of global commitments adopted in 2015 to reduce disaster risks in an all-hazards approach. It explores the correlations between traditional risks associated with critical infrastructures – as understood by the Sendai framework – cyber security risks and the cascading effects characteristic of today’s complex and interrelated shocks and stresses. It takes a step further, expanding the focus of traditionally understood technological risks to explore cyber security risks, at the heart of our societies’ digital transformations,and showcase opportunities from the European context.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing existing literature on cyber security, disaster resilience and cascading disasters, this paper highlights current challenges and good practices undertaken by various governments.

Findings

Understanding disaster risks is a precondition to improving the mitigation of impacts of existing risks and preventing new risks. Effective risk reduction relies on a solid understanding of losses resulting from events to inform future actions, and on the assessment of risks relying on a robust evidence base and state-of-the-art scientific capacity to model and simulate potential hazards. In this context, embedding cyber security risks, and the complexity of cascading impacts in improving the understanding of disaster risks, calls for appropriate methods and tools allowing for a multi-risk and holistic focus to the assessment of risks and the planning of risk management capacities that follow.

Research limitations/implications

Globally and in Europe, focus on interconnected risk and their impacts is steadily increasing. Risk assessments are still conservative; incorporation of cyber resilience into national and local level DRR plans is yet not visible.

Originality/value

Existing research is restricted to cyber security and disaster resilience, as separated subjects. This paper, for the first time, brings together the interconnection between the two topic options to address them.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Siri Hettige and Richard Haigh

The impact of disasters caused by natural hazards on people in affected communities is mediated by a whole range of circumstances such as the intensity of the disaster

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of disasters caused by natural hazards on people in affected communities is mediated by a whole range of circumstances such as the intensity of the disaster, type and nature of the community affected and the nature of loss and displacement. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need to adopt a holistic or integrated approach to assessment of the process of disaster recovery, and to develop a multidimensional assessment framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is designed as a novel qualitative assessment of the recovery process using qualitative data collection techniques from a sample of communities affected by the Indian Ocean tsunami in Eastern and Southern Sri Lanka.

Findings

The outcomes of the interventions have varied widely depending on such factors as the nature of the community, the nature of the intervention and the mode of delivery for donor support. The surveyed communities are ranked in terms of the nature and extent of recovery.

Practical implications

The indices of recovery developed constitute a convenient tool of measurement of effectiveness and limitations of external interventions. The assessment used is multidimensional and socially inclusive.

Originality/value

The approach adopted is new to post-disaster recovery assessments and is useful for monitoring and evaluation of recovery processes. It also fits into the social accountability model as the assessment is based on community experience with the recovery process.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Jieh‐Jiuh Wang

The frequency with which hazards turn to disasters is soaring. Besides the factor of climate variation, errors of decision making during planning are the critical factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The frequency with which hazards turn to disasters is soaring. Besides the factor of climate variation, errors of decision making during planning are the critical factors. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to focus on exploring the relationship between land use planning, development, and disaster management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes hazardscape as the basis of a dialogue platform for land use planning and disaster management. The first portion of this study is to discuss the needed disaster management items in the planning process through thematic analysis; the second portion is to construct the relationship between disaster management and land use planning by the paired comparison method.

Findings

This study proposes the model for integrating planning and disaster management as the foundation of interdisciplinary collaboration. The phase of site choosing and assessment is the most critical point for starting the works of disaster prevention. The major works includes all‐hazard identification/hazardscape analysis and physical vulnerability: damage potential assessment.

Practical implications

This model is helpful to apply to land‐use decision making for evaluating the issues concerning disasters, and avoiding the increasing loss of lives and property. As the next step, attributes of people and environments and assessment techniques from different disciplines can also be included in the model, to achieve the ultimate goal of an environment.

Originality/value

Should disasters strike despite all relevant measures, the associated planning programs monitored and reviewed to enable necessary adjustments.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Sergio O. Saldana-Zorrilla

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a set of policy suggestions for integrating risk management and increasing risk reduction measures and planning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a set of policy suggestions for integrating risk management and increasing risk reduction measures and planning.

Design/methodology/approach

It bases on a brief description of the disaster risk management programs in Mexico, a review of their recent available assessments as well as it makes a brief economic analysis of their performance to conclude with some policy suggestions.

Findings

Despite its novel design, the still low penetration of governmental instruments for disaster risk reduction in Mexico has led to high society’s reliance on post-disaster measures. It has encouraged moral risk among potential victims. Even when crop insurance has increased coverage over the past decade, disaster prevention instruments are still underused. Accessing to prevention funding requires project proposals from national and sub-national governments based on concrete risk assessments. However, the prevailing lack of institutional capacity to elaborate proposals from sub-national governments seems to explain it at a large extent. The paper provides a set of suggestions on this regard.

Originality/value

There is no recent integral assessment of disaster risk in Mexico. Although there is a recent OECD review of the National Civil Protection System, its analysis leaves out the catastrophic agricultural insurance, critical part of comprehensive risk management of a country. On the other hand, there are recent evaluations of programs public for disaster risk management, but these consist of only individual program evaluations, lacking integrative and comparative analysis. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive view of government risk management and concludes with a series of policy recommendations.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2014

Abstract

Details

Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

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