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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Anoop Desai and Anil Mital

The purpose of this paper is to present an interactive system to enable product design for disassembly and to offer robust and quick design solutions based on designers’ input.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an interactive system to enable product design for disassembly and to offer robust and quick design solutions based on designers’ input.

Design/methodology/approach

The system utilizes an interactive questionnaire to communicate with the designer. The questionnaire is in the form of binary questions (Yes/No) and design questions that would enable the system to learn the objectives of the design. Solutions are based on a CAD supported design platform. The efficiency of each design is calculated using disassembly time as the metric of measurement using motion-time measurement (MTM). The designer would be able to make an informed decision with respect to component functionality, ease of disassembly and disassembly time. The paper presents a detailed framework and structure of this system.

Findings

The value of the system is corroborated by means of a case study of an actual product design. The system is structured to offer multiple solutions to a design problem so as to enable the designer to choose the option that best serves their needs.

Originality/value

This novel interactive system would accept customers’ design preferences as input and offer multiple solutions in order to solve the design problem. Process time is directly calculated using the MTM system of measurement by converting design features into time measurement units. Disassembly time can then be easily converted into disassembly cost by using standard conversion rates. The value to designers is obvious.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Roongrat Pisuchpen

In the real world many companies combine the operations of manufacturing, assembly and disassembly. Thus, the integration of just‐in‐time FMS, FAS, and flexible disassembly

Abstract

Purpose

In the real world many companies combine the operations of manufacturing, assembly and disassembly. Thus, the integration of just‐in‐time FMS, FAS, and flexible disassembly system (DAS) models poses an interesting problem. The purpose of this paper is to provide major emphasis on a new simulation model for design and performance evaluation of a flexible assembly and disassembly system with dual Kanban under a stochastic system. This paper also primarily investigates the effect of varying the number of kanban cards, mean inter‐arrival time of demand and locations of the bottlenecks on the performance integration of JIT flexible manufacturing, assembly and disassembly systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Simulation is carried out in ARENA and data is analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). This paper investigates the effect of varying number of kanban cards, mean inter‐arrival time of demand, and locations of the bottlenecks on the performance integration of JIT flexible manufacturing, assembly and disassembly systems. The performance measures that are simultaneously considered are the fill rate, work in process, and mean cycle time. This paper emphasizes that understanding the interactions between the variables and their effects on system performance is of utmost importance for managers in improving performance processes.

Findings

In manufacturing practice, there are many industrial units that represent the mixture of the referred three models. This paper presents a new simulation model for design and performance evaluation of a flexible assembly and disassembly system with dual kanban. The simulation results are statistically compared with MANOVA. MANOVA is used to perform the test with multiple objective functions, e.g. with the average production cycle time, percentage average fill rate, and work‐in‐process. The conclusion to be drawn is that minimized WIP can be obtained by higher percentage average fill rate, lower WIP, small average part cycles times, and increasing in kanban cards while simultaneously retaining full customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The researcher presents the newly developed kanban system into the production system of JIT flexible manufacturing, assembly and disassembly system with simulation technique. Furthermore, by assigning time factors to the models, several performance measures can be easily computed. Then, the researcher tests the effect of the number of kanban card on integration of JIT flexible manufacturing, assembly and disassembly systems using a simulation approach, the simulation model is developed using the ARENA simulation package. The results are applied to a small case study. For a single product under the integration of JIT flexible manufacturing, assembly and disassembly systems, as the number of kanban cards increase, the fill rate along with work in process and the mean cycle time increases as well.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Supachai Vongbunyong, Sami Kara and Maurice Pagnucco

The purpose of this paper is to develop an automated disassembly cell that is flexible and robust to the physical variations of a product. In this way it is capable of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an automated disassembly cell that is flexible and robust to the physical variations of a product. In this way it is capable of dealing with any model of product, regardless of the level of detail in the supplied information.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of cognitive robotics is used to replicate human level expertise in terms of perception and decision making. As a result, difficulties with respect to the uncertainties and variations of the product in the disassembly process are resolved.

Findings

Cognitive functions, namely reasoning and execution monitoring, can be used in basic behaviour control to address problems in variations of the disassembly process due to variations in the product's structure particularly across different models of the product.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a practical approach to formulating the disassembly domain and behaviour control of the cognitive robotic agent via a high‐level logical programming language that combines domain‐specific heuristic knowledge with search to deal with variations in products and uncertainties that arise during the disassembly process.

Practical implications

Full disassembly automation that is flexible and robust to the uncertainties that may arise potentially replaces human labour in a difficult and hazardous task. Consequently, the disassembly process will be more economically feasible, especially in developed countries.

Originality/value

The paper provides a practical approach to the basic cognitive functions that replicate the human expert's behaviour to the disassembly cell.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Louis Brennan, Surendra M. Gupta and Karim N. Taleb

The establishment of disassembly plants and the creation of productdesigns which specifically facilitate disassembly are enablingmanufacturers to carry out item…

Abstract

The establishment of disassembly plants and the creation of product designs which specifically facilitate disassembly are enabling manufacturers to carry out item segregation. Item segregation is defined as the separation from an assembly of a part or a group of parts by following a reverse assembly process. Once segregated, the items can be reused, recycled or discarded. However, there are operational problems associated with item segregation. Foremost among these are the lack of planning and scheduling mechanisms, difficulty in coping with reverse flow of materials and item explosion. Despite the economic and environmental benefits of disassembly, researchers and practitioners are lagging behind in developing methodologies to address the operations and production planning and control issues associated with item segregation. These issues are addressed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Djordje Vukelic, Gordana Ostojic, Stevan Stankovski, Milovan Lazarevic, Branko Tadic, Janko Hodolic and Nenad Simeunovic

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for identification of machining fixtures, and their elements in an assembly/disassembly process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach for identification of machining fixtures, and their elements in an assembly/disassembly process.

Design/methodology/approach

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is applied to identification of physical machining fixtures and their basic elements.

Findings

Based on comprehensive testing in industrial conditions it was established by this research that the use of RFID technology contributes to significant reduction of assembly/disassembly time of machining fixtures.

Practical implications

Practical applicability of RFID technology is emphasized and demonstrated in the paper. The suggested system is proven superior in comparison with conventional methods for identification of fixtures/fixture elements which qualifies it for real industrial application.

Originality/value

To the best of authors' knowledge there are no previous reports of successful application of RFID technology on identification of fixtures/fixture elements.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Robert Bogue

This paper aims to illustrate the growing role robots are playing in recycling and product disassembly and provide an insight into recent research activities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the growing role robots are playing in recycling and product disassembly and provide an insight into recent research activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a short introduction, this first considers robotic waste sorting systems and then describes two systems for the disassembly of electronic products. It then provides details of some recent research activities. Finally, brief conclusions are drawn.

Findings

Robotic systems exploiting artificial intelligence combined with various sensing and machine vision technologies are playing a growing role in the sorting of municipal and industrial waste, prior to recycling. These are mostly based on delta robots and can achieve pick rates of 60-70 items/min and be configured to recognise and select a wide range of different materials and items from moving conveyors. Electronic waste recycling is yet to benefit significantly from robotics although a limited number of systems have been developed for product disassembly. Disassembly techniques are the topic of a concerted research effort which often involves robots and humans collaborating and sharing disassembly tasks.

Originality/value

This provides an insight into the present-day uses and potential future role of robots in recycling which has traditionally been a highly labour-intensive industry.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Eyal Zussman

Examines the problems to be considered when looking at the operationplanning of a disassembly factory. Discusses the recycling network comprisingthe manufacturers…

Abstract

Examines the problems to be considered when looking at the operation planning of a disassembly factory. Discusses the recycling network comprising the manufacturers, consumers, disassembly plants and the recycling plants in which the disassembly plants are considered as dismantlers and waste management providers. Looks at the need to establish a methodology for operation planning and controlling of discarded complex products. Concludes that disassembly of obsolete products is a challenge to flexible automation and that fully integrated solutions, enabling the automatic design of environmentally conscious products and recovery processes are the first step towards advanced disassembly systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Anoop Desai and Anil Mital

This paper seeks to present a methodology to design products for disassembly. This would facilitate end‐of‐life product disassembly with a view to maximizing material…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a methodology to design products for disassembly. This would facilitate end‐of‐life product disassembly with a view to maximizing material usage in the supply chain at a low cost to the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology presented in the paper draws on fundamentals related to task analysis and motion time measurement. The methodology was practically applied to disassemble several different consumer products with significant savings in time.

Findings

Several improvements in product design resulted from various perspectives including functionality, assembly, aesthetics and disassembly.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies several areas of future research including design optimization and designing work fixtures for disassembly.

Originality/value

This work presents in part an improvement in current methodologies related to disassembly as well as original work based on task analysis and suggestion of design alternatives. The paper is therefore valuable to practitioners and researchers alike.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Joseph Chiodo and Nick Jones

Smart materials (SMs) have the potential for facilitating active disassembly (AD). Select SMs are used in the design of devices to aid product disassembly. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Smart materials (SMs) have the potential for facilitating active disassembly (AD). Select SMs are used in the design of devices to aid product disassembly. The purpose of this paper is to compare different AD approaches and highlight future work and potential.

Design/methodology/approach

This work is a survey of the collated AD research employing only Smart and “made Smart” materials work from various published work in the field from companies and academia since its original invention. The introduction gives general discussion of AD with cost implications and how the technology could offer very lean dismantling. An overview of the history of the work is given with the context of the implications for the need for a technology like AD to retain critical materials.

Findings

Besides a survey to date, comparisons were made of each AD technology application highlighting advantages and challenges. Comparisons were also made prior to this in alternative disassembly strategies to give context to the potential usefulness of the technology.

Practical implications

Only AD with SMs or “made Smart” were highlighted with some considerations for potential candidates.

Originality/value

A survey of AD work only employing SMs and “made‐Smart” materials to date. Comparisons of each AD application were made highlighting advantages and challenges. Comparisons were made between AD and alternative disassembly strategies to give context to the potential usefulness of the technology. The conclusion included an overview of work with consideration for future work. A candidate technology with the most potential was discussed.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Hui Wang, Dong Xiang, Yiming Rong and Linxuan Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to review the fundamental methodology and its development of intelligent disassembly planning research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the fundamental methodology and its development of intelligent disassembly planning research.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief introduction, this paper first discusses the fundamental problems associated with disassembly planning and analysis. And then considers the role of intelligent optimization methods in the disassembly planning field. This is followed by a summary and conclusion.

Findings

Many advances have been made in computerized intelligent disassembly planning research, which is a natural evolutionary result of both traditional solving methodology and much research effort over past two decades. But as yet, some fundamental limitations are also rooted in this computational model‐based methodology.

Originality/value

The paper provides a fundamental review on the development of computerized intelligent disassembly planning research.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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