Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2020

Sally Lindsay, Mana Rezai, Winny Shen and Brent Lyons

Many employers struggle with how to have a disability disclosure discussion with their employees and job candidates. The primary purpose of this study was to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

Many employers struggle with how to have a disability disclosure discussion with their employees and job candidates. The primary purpose of this study was to identify issues relevant to disability disclosure discussions. In addition, we explored how simulations, as an educational tool, may help employers and managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven participants (four employers and three human resource professionals) took part in this study. We used a qualitative design that involved two focus group discussions to understand participants' experiences of building a simulation training scenario that focused on how to have a disability disclosure discussion. The simulation sessions were audio-recorded and analyzed using an open-coding thematic approach.

Findings

Four main themes emerged from our analysis. Three themes focused on issues that participants identified as relevant to the disability disclosure process, including: (1) creating a comfortable and safe space for employees to disclose, (2) how to ask employees or job candidates about disability and (3) how to respond to employees disability disclosure. A fourth theme focused on how simulations could be relevant as an educational tool.

Originality/value

Developing a simulation on disability disclosure discussions is a novel approach to educating employers and managers that has the potential to help enhance diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Further, the process that we followed can be used as a model for other researchers seeking to develop educational training scenarios on sensitive diversity and inclusion topics.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Chris Attoe, Gregoire Billon, Samantha Riches, Karina Marshall-Tate, James Wheildon and Sean Cross

People with intellectual disabilities experience poorer health outcomes than the general population, and a significantly increased risk of mental health comorbidity. Their…

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disabilities experience poorer health outcomes than the general population, and a significantly increased risk of mental health comorbidity. Their access to healthcare has been consistently shown as inadequate, and their access to mental health support is still largely wanting. Adequate training and education should improve these shortcomings but there is limited evidence available as to the best way to achieve this. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the co-production and co-delivery of a simulation training course to support healthcare professionals to provide care for people with intellectual disabilities, with a particular focus on their mental health needs. This training was designed with actors with intellectual disabilities, who participated as simulated patients in scenarios during the course and subsequently provided feedback on their experience.

Findings

This paper focusses on the positive experiences of the simulated patients, reporting on and interpreting their direct feedback on their experience of contributing to the development and delivery of the course and being involved as co-educators.

Originality/value

It is highlighted that the co-production and delivery of this simulation training with people with intellectual disabilities has the potential to realise some of the key principles called upon when attempting to improve how they are treated, by illustrating concrete participation, independence, and access to fulfilling lives. The value and benefits of interprofessional education to achieve these educational aims is further highlighted, particularly for the potential to generate a sense of shared responsibility within mainstream services in caring for people with intellectual disabilities.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Jörgen Lundälv, Henrik Ehrlington and Andreas Johansen

The purpose of this study is to describe knowledge, awareness and experience of different employees in a Swedish municipality (City of Gothenburg) concerning the disability

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe knowledge, awareness and experience of different employees in a Swedish municipality (City of Gothenburg) concerning the disability perspective, accessibility and universal design in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an online survey. A total of 119 different employees responded to the survey. The data was analyzed from a mixed-method approach, using descriptive statistics and textual analysis. The study also included personal interviews with 19 employees in the City of Gothenburg.

Findings

A total of 521 employees in the City of Gothenburg participated in disability awareness exercises (DAE) at the Disability Awareness Arena to gain greater knowledge and insight on disability perspectives in different environments and services. Of these, 119 people representing different professions in soft and hard services and companies participated in the survey; and 19 people participated in personal interviews. The study showed that a vast majority of them were very satisfied and they have developed and practiced their new knowledge and attitude toward disability and accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation in this study is that it has investigated the experiences and effects of the DAE 6–12 months after its implementation. Therefore, it is not possible to analyze long-term effects that the DAE can have in practice.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no prior study of these issues has been conducted in Sweden. This study is deemed to have significant social benefit because of the steadily increasing demand for disability simulations, awareness of disability perspective and accessibility in municipality settings. No other study has addressed the importance of the DAE in these perspectives. DAE is defined in this article as a unique concept for promoting the usage of the disability perspective in the everyday workplace.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Kenneth L. Robey

In Schelling’s “checkerboard” model of segregation, individuals’ moderately held preferences about the proportion of their neighbors who are similar versus dissimilar to…

Abstract

Purpose

In Schelling’s “checkerboard” model of segregation, individuals’ moderately held preferences about the proportion of their neighbors who are similar versus dissimilar to them can, through an automatic and mathematical process, yield dramatic population-level segregative behaviors. The notion of such an automatic segregative process would seem to have implications for spatial dynamics when a group home for persons with disabilities is introduced into a community. This study sought to examine those implications alongside data in the research literature regarding community acceptance of group homes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an agent-based modeling approach, computer simulations were constructed to apply Schelling’s model, as well as an alternative model, to community reaction to the introduction of group homes for persons with disabilities. Simulation conditions were set to roughly correspond to the proportion of group homes or other congregate living situations, as well as vacant dwellings, in a typical community in the United States.

Design/methodology/approach

The simulations predict that group homes will, to varying degrees, become spatially isolated within their communities. These predictions conflict with previous research findings that suggest minimal relocation of neighbors and rapid adjustment of communities to the presence of group homes.

Social implications

Simulations of an automatic segregative process might offer a baseline or a “null hypothesis” of sorts, allowing us to more fully understand the extent of the social and socioeconomic forces that serve to moderate or override such an automatic process, allowing communities to adjust to group homes’ presence.

Details

Environmental Contexts and Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-262-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 December 2010

Steve Hardy and Eddie Chaplin

This case report provides a description of a simulation exercise as part of the induction programme for a staff team recruited to a specialist inpatient service for adults…

Abstract

This case report provides a description of a simulation exercise as part of the induction programme for a staff team recruited to a specialist inpatient service for adults with intellectual disabilities and additional mental health problems. The rationale for this novel approach is described, along with details of its planning, implementation and outcomes.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Sara Santilli, Maria Cristina Ginevra, Ilaria Di Maggio and Laura Nota

Current educational contexts in many countries are characterized by high heterogeneity and plurality. The inclusion of students who represent a range of life experiences…

Abstract

Current educational contexts in many countries are characterized by high heterogeneity and plurality. The inclusion of students who represent a range of life experiences, including migration, psychological difficulties, low socio-economic status or disability, has required schools to support diversity through identifying different ways of enhancing learning through personalization of instruction and attention to the needs of individuals at different stages of their lives. Despite knowledge of the advantages of diversity, in educational contexts in which students with disabilities or other vulnerabilities have been included, micro- and macro-exclusion and victimization phenomena continue to be experienced. It is essential, therefore, to identify effective interventions with the goal of reducing stereotypical views of difference and disability and enabling students to learn to collaborate, play and work with others. This chapter explores a number of evidence-based programmes and interventions to promote more inclusive environments from kindergarten through university, emphasizing the importance of mutual support and valuing of diversity, ensuring greater social justice for all.

Details

Promoting Social Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-524-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Hannah Iannelli, Camilla Tooley, Grégoire Billon, Sean Cross, James Pathan and Chris Attoe

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality. Currently, many training provisions based on ID exist; however, limited research supports their effectiveness. High-fidelity simulation is an innovative training mechanism with promising preliminary results. This study aims to evaluate the longitudinal impact of simulation training on clinical practice in ID.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was used in this study. A one-day simulation course using actors who had ID was delivered to 39 health-care professionals from across London hospitals. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted 12–18 months post training.

Findings

High-fidelity simulation training is an effective training modality, which has a sustainable impact on participants, their clinical practice and patients. Core features of the training including debriefing, the use and type of actors, scenario design and the facilitators are crucial learning mechanisms which impacts learning outcomes and changes to behaviour in clinical practice and settings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to longitudinally evaluate high-fidelity simulation training designed to improve the physical and mental health needs of those with ID. The research begins to bridge an important gap in the current literature, with a need for more research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Bertha Maya Sopha, Risqika Edni Doni Achsan and Anna Maria Sri Asih

Uneven distribution and mistarget beneficiaries are among problems encountered during post-disaster relief operations in 2010 Mount Merapi eruption. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Uneven distribution and mistarget beneficiaries are among problems encountered during post-disaster relief operations in 2010 Mount Merapi eruption. The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically founded agent-based simulation model addressing the evacuation dynamics and to explore coordination mechanism and other promising strategies during last-mile relief delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

An agent-based model which was specified and parameterized by empirical research (interviews and survey) was developed to understand the mechanism of individual decision making underlying the evacuation dynamics. A set of model testing was conducted to evaluate confidence level of the model in representing the evacuation dynamics during post-disaster of 2010 Mount Merapi eruption. Three scenarios of last-mile relief delivery at both strategic and operational levels were examined to evaluate quantitatively the effectiveness of the coordination mechanism and to explore other promising strategies.

Findings

Results indicate that the empirically founded agent-based modeling was able to reproduce the general pattern of observable Internal Displaced Persons based on government records, both at micro and macro levels, with a statistically non-significant difference. Low hazard perception and leader-following behavior which refuses to evacuate are the two factors responsible for late evacuation. Unsurprisingly, coordination through information sharing results in better performance than without coordination. To deal with both uneven distribution and long-term demand fulfillment, coordination among volunteers during aid distribution (at downstream operation) is not sufficient. The downstream coordination should also be accompanied with coordination between aid centers at the upstream operation. Furthermore, the coordination which is combined with other operational strategies, such as clustering strategy, using small-sized trucks and pre-positioning strategy, seems to be promising. It appears that the combined strategy of coordination and clustering strategy performs best among other combined strategies.

Practical implications

The significant role of early evacuation and self-evacuation behavior toward efficient evacuation indicates that human factor (i.e. hazard perception and cultural factor) should be considered in designing evacuation plan. Early warning system through both technology and community empowerment is necessary to support early evacuation. The early warning system should also be accompanied with at least 69 percent of the population performing self-evacuation behavior for the effective evacuation. As information sharing through coordination is necessary to avoid redundant efforts, uneven distribution and eventually to reduce unmet demand, the government can act as a coordinating actor to authorize the operation and mobilize the resources. The combination of coordination and another strategy reducing lead time such as clustering analysis, thus increasing responsiveness, is seemly strategy for efficient and effective last-mile relief distribution.

Originality/value

Literature on coordination is dominated by qualitative approach, which is difficult to evaluate its effectiveness quantitatively. Providing realistic setting of the evacuation dynamics in the course of the 2010 Mount Merapi eruption, the empirically founded agent-based model can be used to understand the factors influencing the evacuation dynamics and subsequently to quantitatively examine coordination mechanisms and other potential strategies toward efficient and effective last-mile relief distribution.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Christa S. Bialka and Gina Mancini

The purpose of this paper was to understand what disability-related curriculum (DRC) looked like in the middle school Language Arts classroom. DRC refers to any curricular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to understand what disability-related curriculum (DRC) looked like in the middle school Language Arts classroom. DRC refers to any curricular material and related pedagogical approach intended to address students’ understanding of disability. The authors drew on the experiences of three in-service middle school Language Arts teachers to understand what disability-related texts they selected, and why they chose to incorporate DRC into their classrooms.

Design/methods/approach

The authors used a qualitative, exploratory multi-case design to understand the what and why underlying three middle school language arts teachers’ use of DRC.

Findings

Findings from this study revealed that teachers leveraged DRC to broaden students’ understanding of diversity, increase empathy and provide exposure to disabilities; teachers gathered resources both online and within existing curriculum; and DRC varied in curricular and pedagogical structure.

Research limitations

The results of this study are exploratory. Although the aforementioned findings are promising, they are limited, due to the small sample size and relatively homogeneous participant demographics. Additional research that incorporates a larger and more diverse sample of participants would serve to broaden, or potentially confirm, the results of this study.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide insight into current practice around DRC while illustrating some of the limitations that teachers may encounter when integrating this practice.

Originality/value

While Language Arts curriculum often explores diversity in relation to race or class, it rarely focuses a lens on disability. This study fills a void in current research by providing empirical data on how educators approach the design and implementation of disability programming in their respective classrooms.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Angela Hall, Stacy Hickox, Jennifer Kuan and Connie Sung

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify…

Abstract

Barriers to employment are a significant issue in the United States and abroad. As civil rights legislation continues to be enforced and as employers seek to diversify their workplaces, it is incumbent upon the management field to offer insights that address obstacles to work. Although barriers to employment have been addressed in various fields such as psychology and economics, management scholars have addressed this issue in a piecemeal fashion. As such, our review will offer a comprehensive, integrative model of barriers to employment that addresses both individual and organizational perspectives. We will also address societal-level concerns involving these barriers. An integrative perspective is necessary for research to progress in this area because many individuals with barriers to employment face multiple challenges that prevent them from obtaining and maintaining full employment. While the additive, or possibly multiplicative, effect of employment barriers have been acknowledged in related fields like rehabilitation counseling and vocational psychology, the Human Resource Management (HRM) literature has virtually ignored this issue. We discuss suggestions for the reduction or elimination of barriers to employment. We also provide an integrative model of employment barriers that addresses the mutable (amenable to change) nature of some barriers, while acknowledging the less mutable nature of others.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000