Search results

1 – 4 of 4
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Julian Krumeich, Benjamin Weis, Dirk Werth and Peter Loos

The business operations of today's enterprises are heavily influenced by numerous of internal and external business events. With the Event Driven Architecture and…

Abstract

Purpose

The business operations of today's enterprises are heavily influenced by numerous of internal and external business events. With the Event Driven Architecture and particularly the Complex Event Processing (CEP), the technology required for identifying complex correlations in these large amounts of event data right after its appearance has already emerged. The resulting gain in operational transparency builds the foundation for (near) real-time reactions. This motivated extensive research activities especially in the field of Business Process Management (BPM), which essentially coined the term Event-Driven BPM (EDBPM). Now, several years after the advent of this new concept, the purpose of this paper is to shed light to the question: where are we now on our way towards a sophisticated adoption of the CEP technology within BPM?

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology of this paper is a structured literature analysis. It basically follows the procedure proposed by vom Brocke et al. (2009). This verified five-step process – entitled “Reconstructing the giant” – allowed a rigorous study. As a result, various research clusters were derived, whose state-of-the-art exposed existing research gaps within EDBPM.

Findings

First of all, the paper provides a concise conceptual basis on different application possibilities of EDBPM. Afterwards, it synthesizes current research into six clusters and highlights most significant work within them. Finally, a research agenda is proposed to tackle existing research gaps to pave the way towards fully realizing the potentials of the paradigm.

Originality/value

So far, a comparable study of the current state-of-the-art within EDBPM is non-existent. The findings of this paper, e.g. the proposed research agenda, help scholars to focus their research efforts on specific aspects that need to be considered in order to advance the adoption of the CEP technology within BPM.

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

David Alexander and Olesea Ghedrovici

The Republic of Moldova is a small country between Romania and Ukraine, which for more than 20 years since its independence, is still experiencing a painful process of…

Abstract

Purpose

The Republic of Moldova is a small country between Romania and Ukraine, which for more than 20 years since its independence, is still experiencing a painful process of economic and institutional reforms. The chapter provides, against a review of literature and national regulations, an analysis and possible perspectives of accounting harmonization processes in relation to historical and cultural preconditions.

Approach/methodology

Based on content analysis of national regulations and economic conditions in the Republic of Moldova, with the support of a literature review.

Findings

Our findings demonstrate that some features related to mentality, which have been formed as a result of long term political and cultural closeness and negation of individualistic and independent thinking values, are determining many contemporaneous changes in all spheres, including accounting.

Originality/scientific value

There are very few publications about accounting processes in the Republic of Moldova. It is important to analyze the case of the Republic of Moldova in the context of accounting transformation in post-Soviet countries, as almost all of them have similar historical and cultural implications. The research results may be useful for further studies about accounting evolution in post-communist states and also in the Republic of Moldova itself.

Details

Accounting in Central and Eastern Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-939-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

June M.L. Poon

This study aimed to examine the predictive effects of trustworthiness attributes (i.e. benevolence, integrity, and ability) on trust‐in‐supervisor.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the predictive effects of trustworthiness attributes (i.e. benevolence, integrity, and ability) on trust‐in‐supervisor.

Design/methodology/approach

A field survey using a structured questionnaire was used to gather data from 107 white‐collar employees from diverse organizations in Malaysia. The data were analysed using hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results showed that perceptions of supervisor benevolence, integrity, and ability predicted trust‐in‐supervisor both directly and interactively. Further analysis revealed that integrity and ability interacted in a compensatory manner to predict trust‐in‐supervisor when benevolence was high but not when it was low.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include the use of self‐report cross‐sectional data. The findings underscore the importance of looking beyond statistical models that test only for main and two‐way interaction effects in research examining trustworthiness attributes. Researchers should consider examining three‐way interaction effects or run the risk of having a misspecified model. Also, research to determine the relative importance of trustworthiness attributes and the conditions under which one attribute is given more weight than another is needed.

Practical implications

Supervisors should be made aware of the importance of treating their subordinates with benevolence. Nevertheless, because benevolence is a necessary but insufficient condition for fostering trust, employers must ensure that their supervisors have high integrity and ability or, at the very least, one of these attributes.

Originality/value

This study highlighted the importance of examining higher order effects in research examining trustworthiness attributes and provides what is perhaps the first empirical test of how benevolence, integrity, and ability interact to predict trust‐in‐supervisor.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 4 of 4