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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Dirk H.R. Spennemann, Melissa Pike and Maggie J. Watson

There is much anecdotal evidence that birds and their droppings are a major problem for the heritage profession. The purpose of this paper is to examine how serious…

Abstract

Purpose

There is much anecdotal evidence that birds and their droppings are a major problem for the heritage profession. The purpose of this paper is to examine how serious heritage practitioners consider the bird impact to be.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted of 59 Australian heritage professionals of between one and >20 year’s experience in the field.

Findings

Bird impacts were not considered of major concern to buildings. The longer experience a practitioner had, the less likely the impacts were considered an issue. Feral pigeons were deemed the most problematic, followed by cockatoos, starlings, swallows, seagulls, mynas, sparrows, cormorants, ibis, ducks and birds of prey. The professionals ranked common deterrent methods. The highest-ranking deterrents were bird netting and bird spikes, but they were only considered moderately effective. The costs of installation and maintenance, as well the ease of installation, were all deemed significantly less important than the physical impact, the aesthetic sympathy and the effectiveness of a deterrent method.

Practical implications

This study indicates that the impact of birds on buildings in Australia may be of less concern than previously thought, and may be driven by other factors (i.e. aesthetics, commercial companies) rather than actual effects.

Originality/value

This is first study of its kind that surveyed the experiences of a wide range of heritage practitioners.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Kristy Graham and Dirk H.R. Spennemann

Natural disasters exert a continual toll not only on property and public infrastructure, but also on places and items of cultural heritage value. Whereas infrastructure…

1531

Abstract

Purpose

Natural disasters exert a continual toll not only on property and public infrastructure, but also on places and items of cultural heritage value. Whereas infrastructure and modern buildings can be rebuilt, archaeological and heritage sites cannot be restored without loss of integrity and authenticity. Often, the impact of management decisions during and following a disaster is greater than the physical impact of the disaster itself. Aims to assess attitudinal barriers that may exist among disaster management professionals, a study of local controllers of the state emergency service of New South Wales (Australia).

Design/methodology/approach

All local controllers of the state emergency service of New South Wales were surveyed by a mail‐out questionnaire as to their knowledge of cultural heritage and their attitudes to the protection of cultural heritage assets during bushfires.

Findings

Key areas identified are a general lack of awareness of the special needs of heritage places, a lack of communication between emergency and heritage managers; an acknowledged need for but decided absence of disaster planning for cultural heritage assets; and a need for training and education.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered the local controllers of the state emergency service of New South Wales. Given the observed attitudinal barriers, there is a need for future research looking at the attitudes held by the various levels in the vertical decision making and authority tree.

Practical implications

The awareness of SES controllers regarding cultural heritage in disaster situations needs to be improved as are the communication channels both in the disaster preparedness and the disaster response phase.

Originality/value

This is the first time research has been carried out into assessing the attitudes and awareness of local controllers of the state emergency service of New South Wales with respect to cultural heritage asset management.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Dirk H.R. Spennemann

This paper seeks to look at the usage of the internet by students, academics and university administrators as part of their normal working day. It investigates whether…

1686

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to look at the usage of the internet by students, academics and university administrators as part of their normal working day. It investigates whether access to computer facilities and the mode of study have any influence, or whether other factors need to be considered when providing services.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess this, the paper considers the diurnal nature of general internet usage in Australia, addresses the daily average internet use at various Australian universities, and considers how much the usage profile says about the student profile and student study habits.

Findings

Web usage is high at the start of the work day and then peaks at the end of the work period, with another slight peak by 7 p.m., presumably after the dinner period, representing those who come on‐line in the evening.

Originality/value

The analysis of the proxy usage of nine Australian universities has shown that the vast majority of usage in the Victorian and South Australian universities in the sample is limited to office hours with 81 per cent of all usage occurring during the standard working hours and flexi‐time period between 08:00 and 18:00 (72 per cent between 09:00 and 17:00).

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Dirk H.R. Spennemann and John S. Atkinson

This paper details a longitudinal study into the e‐mail habits of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the…

Abstract

This paper details a longitudinal study into the e‐mail habits of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the factors and barriers that can influence the successfully adoption of technology into the learning environment. The findings from this study illustrate that e‐mail applications are very popular in terms of both useage as well as the high level of confidence that students exhibit. The survey identified two main areas that need to be addressed, namely the disadvantage of rural students in accessing e‐mail and second that male students tend not to be as frequent users of e‐mail compared to their female counterparts.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Dirk H.R. Spennemann, Melissa Pike and Maggie J. Watson

Birds are implicated in spoiling and decay of buildings, especially through their droppings. Pigeons are considered the main culprits, and several studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Birds are implicated in spoiling and decay of buildings, especially through their droppings. Pigeons are considered the main culprits, and several studies have examined the effects and chemistry of accumulations of droppings without evidence to the exact origins of the source of the excreta. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews and summarises the state of knowledge with regard to the impact of bird excreta on buildings. It experimentally assesses the acidity of fresh pigeon excreta with different diets and examines the development of the acidity of the excreta after voiding.

Findings

Feral pigeons in urban settings are known to be fed by a range of foods. Urban food scraps-derived diets produce more acidic excreta than more natural diets such as seeds. This is a first study of its kind to examine the impact of a bird’s diet on the pH and thus the resulting (potential) decay of masonry.

Research limitations/implications

This study showed that from a management’s perspective, pigeons that subsist entirely on human provided foods will be depositing more initially acidic faeces. If faecal accumulation occurs; then, mould and other bacteria quickly alter the chemistry from acidic towards basic, but the damage may already be done.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study of its kind to examine the effects of fresh pigeon droppings of known origin and age once voided from the intestine. This allows the authors to assess the impact during the first few days.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Dirk H.R. Spennemann

Attempts to understand, via a questionnaire, students’ attitudes towards electronic mail and to evaluate its effectiveness in student learning. Analyses the data and gives…

185

Abstract

Attempts to understand, via a questionnaire, students’ attitudes towards electronic mail and to evaluate its effectiveness in student learning. Analyses the data and gives an interpretation of the results, discussing some of the issues raised.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Dirk H.R. Spennemann and John S. Atkinson

This paper details a longitudinal study into the data management practices of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research…

685

Abstract

This paper details a longitudinal study into the data management practices of first year students at Charles Sturt University. This study is part of ongoing research investigating the factors and barriers that can influence the successful adoption of technology into the learning environment. The findings suggest that students are exhibiting poor data management skills and lack the understanding to recover from data loss situations.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Cornforth, John Atkinson and Dirk H.R. Spennemann

Many researchers require access to computer facilities beyond those offered by desktop workstations. Traditionally, these are offered either through partnerships, to share…

958

Abstract

Purpose

Many researchers require access to computer facilities beyond those offered by desktop workstations. Traditionally, these are offered either through partnerships, to share the cost of supercomputing facilities, or through purpose‐built cluster facilities. However, funds are not always available to satisfy either of these options, and university departments are under increasing pressure to obtain the maximum return on investment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a low‐cost cluster computing facility using existing workstations in undergraduate computing laboratories.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a previous feasibility study, experiments were conducted with cluster configurations of increasing size to determine the benefits and drawbacks. This was followed by identification and resolution of problems, and assessment of effects upon existing users of the computers.

Findings

A working cluster was built to supply the needs of researchers, with almost no impact upon existing users and at very little cost.

Research limitations/implications

At present, the workstations can only be used as a “processor farm” and it is unclear how MPI type processing may be achieved, because there is no guarantee of the number of workstations available at any specific time.

Practical implications

Any institution requiring access to high performance computing can build a useful resource from existing computers at minimal cost. The usefulness of the resource depends on existing computers being under utilised.

Originality/value

The novel aspect of this work is that the facility was built using existing student computing laboratories.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Dirk HR Spennemann

This paper aims to describe the nature and significance of Sorel’s cooking appliance and to examine the promotion and marketing options used by Sorel to make it an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the nature and significance of Sorel’s cooking appliance and to examine the promotion and marketing options used by Sorel to make it an appliance that was “widely used in private residences and by small eating houses.” It will highlight the role of the individual and will demonstrate that marketing and promotion strategies that are modulated by the social ambitions of the manufacturer.

Design/methodology/approach

The basis of this research is extensive quantitative and qualitative analysis of primary sources, mainly the advertisements placed by Sorel, supported by information in contemporary newspapers and journals.

Findings

Stanislas Sorel’s invention of an early form of thermostat allowed him to develop a stove that could cook a four-course family dinner largely unsupervised, an invention which was poised to revolutionise the lives of many households. Sorel was primarily an inventor striving for acceptance in the scientific world, with limited skills in the commercialisation of his inventions. His promotion and marketing efforts reflect both the social realities of the time and his own ambitions.

Originality/value

There has been very little research into the way small French inventors and manufacturers approached the marketing of their products. The paper provides a unique insight into the promotion techniques of a mid-nineteenth-century French inventor-cum-entrepreneur and highlights the role of the individual and how actions are constrained by ambition and opportunity. The paper provides an example of how research into how specific individuals can inform the larger history of marketing.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Dirk Spennemann, David Cornforth and John Atkinson

This paper seeks to examine the spatial patterns of student use of machines in each laboratory to whether there are underlying commonalities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the spatial patterns of student use of machines in each laboratory to whether there are underlying commonalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out by assessing the user behaviour in 16 computer laboratories at a regional university in Australia.

Findings

The study found that computers within easy access to doors are disproportionately more used than computer that are further away, irrespective of other “incentive” such as windows, wall anchoring or security camera positioning.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for any division within a university environment responsible for the spatial positioning of computer in a student laboratory.

Originality/value

Previous research of the use of computer laboratories in schools and universities has focussed on educational issues. None of the studies so far have considered matters of situational territoriality and spatial patterning that govern human behaviour.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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