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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Dirk De Clercq and Renato Pereira

Drawing from the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to investigate the relationship between employees’ knowledge-sharing efforts and creative behaviors;…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to investigate the relationship between employees’ knowledge-sharing efforts and creative behaviors; particularly, it addresses how this relationship may be invigorated by three resources that operate at individual (passion for work), job (time sufficiency) and organizational (procedural justice) levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data were collected through a survey administered to employees in a banking organization in Mozambique.

Findings

The usefulness of knowledge-sharing efforts for stimulating creative behavior is greater when employees feel passionate about work, have sufficient time to complete their job tasks and perceive that organizational decision-making is fair.

Practical implications

The results inform organizations about the circumstances in which the application of employees’ collective knowledge bases, derived from their peer interactions, to the generation of novel solutions for problem situations is more likely to materialize.

Originality/value

By detailing the interactive routes by which knowledge-sharing efforts and distinct resources (passion for work, time sufficiency and procedural justice) promote employee creative behavior, this study extends prior research that has focused on the direct influences of these resources on knowledge sharing and creative work outcomes. It pinpoints the circumstances in which intra-organizational knowledge exchange can generate the greatest value, in terms of enhancing creativity.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Dirk De Clercq and Renato Pereira

This study seeks to unravel the relationship between employees' passion for work and their engagement in problem-focused voice behavior by identifying a mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to unravel the relationship between employees' passion for work and their engagement in problem-focused voice behavior by identifying a mediating role of their efforts to promote work-related goal congruence and a moderating role of their perceptions of pandemic threats to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested with quantitative data collected through a survey instrument administered among 158 employees in a large Portuguese-based organization that operates in the food sector, in the midst of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The Process macro was applied to assess the moderated mediation dynamic that underpins the proposed theoretical framework.

Findings

Employees' positive work-related energy enhances their propensity to speak up about organizational failures because they seek to find common ground with their colleagues with respect to the organization's goals and future. The mediating role of such congruence-promoting efforts is particularly prominent to the extent that employees dwell on the threats that a pandemic holds for their organization.

Practical implications

The study pinpoints how HR managers can leverage a negative situation—employees who cannot keep the harmful organizational impact of a life-threatening virus out of their minds—into productive outcomes, by channeling positive work energy, derived from their passion for work, toward activities that bring organizational problems into the open.

Originality/value

This study adds to HR management research by unveiling how employees' attempts to gather their coworkers around a shared work-related mindset can explain how their passion might spur reports of problem areas, as well as explicating how perceived pandemic-related threats activate this process.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Imanol Belausteguigoitia Rius and Dirk De Clercq

This paper aims to investigate the relationship of knowledge sharing with unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB) and the potential augmenting effects of two factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship of knowledge sharing with unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB) and the potential augmenting effects of two factors: employees’ dispositional resistance to change and perceptions of organizational politics.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data come from employees in a Mexican manufacturing organization. The hypotheses tests use hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Knowledge sharing increases the risk that employees engage in UPB. This effect is most salient when employees tend to resist organizational change or believe the organizational climate is highly political.

Practical implications

Organizations should discourage UPB with their ranks, and to do so, they must realize that employees’ likelihood to engage in it may be enhanced by their access to peer knowledge. Employees with such access may feel more confident that they can protect their organization against external scrutiny through such unethical means. This process can be activated by both personal and organizational factors that make UPB appear more desirable.

Originality/value

This study contributes to organizational research by providing a deeper understanding of the risk that employees will engage in UPB, according to the extent of their knowledge sharing. It also explicates when knowledge sharing might have the greatest impact, both for good and for ill.

Objetivo

Este artículo analiza la relación entre compartir conocimiento y el comportamiento pro-organizacional no ético (CPE), así como el potencial efecto amplificador de dos factores: la resistencia al cambio de los empleados y la percepción del clima político de la organización.

Diseño/metodología/aproximación

Se emplean datos cuantitativos procedentes de los empleados de una organización manufacturera mejicana. Las hipótesis se contrastan utilizando análisis de regresión jerárquico.

Resultados

Compartir conocimiento aumenta el riesgo de que el empleado desarrolle CPE. Este efecto es mayor cuando los empleados muestran resistencia a los cambios organizativos o creen que el clima organizativo está altamente politizado.

Implicaciones prácticas

Las organizaciones deben desincentivar el CPE, y para hacerlo deben comprender que la probabilidad de que ocurra aumenta con el acceso al conocimiento de otros compañeros. Los empleados con acceso a este conocimiento pueden percibir que pueden proteger a la organización frente al escrutinio externo por medio de este comportamiento no ético. Este proceso puede activarse tanto por factores personales como organizacionales que hagan la aparición de CPE más deseable.

Originalidad/valor

Este estudio contribuye a la investigación proporcionando una comprensión más profunda del riesgo de que los empleados muestren CPE, en conexión con su grado de conocimiento compartido. También explica cuando compartir conocimiento puede tener un mayor impacto, para bien o para mal.

Objetivo

Este artigo analisa a relação entre compartilhar o conhecimento e comportamento pró-organizacional antiético (CPA), bem como o potencial efeito ampliador de dois fatores: a resistência a mudança de funcionários e a percepção do clima político da organização.

Design/metodologia/aproximação

Dados quantitativos são utilizados por funcionários de uma organização de manufatura mexicana. As hipóteses são testadas usando análise de regressão hierárquica.

Objetivo

Resultados – Compartilhar os resultados aumenta o risco de que o funcionário desenvolva o CPA. Esse efeito é maior quando os funcionários mostram resistência às mudanças organizacionais ou acreditam que o clima organizacional é altamente politizado.

Implicações práticas

As organizações devem desencorajar o CPA, e para isso devem entender que a probabilidade de isso acontecer aumenta com o acesso ao conhecimento de outros colegas. Os funcionários com acesso a esse conhecimento podem perceber que podem proteger a organização do escrutínio externo por meio desse comportamento antiético. Este processo pode ser ativado por fatores pessoais e organizacionais que tornam o surgimento de CPA mais desejável.

Originalidade/valor

Este estudo contribui para a investigação, fornecendo uma compreensão mais profunda do risco que os funcionários exibem CPA, em conexão com o seu grau de conhecimento compartilhado. Também explica quando o compartilhar conhecimento pode ter um impacto maior, para melhor ou para pior.

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Dirk De Clercq, Muhammad Umer Azeem and Inam Ul Haq

This study seeks to unpack the negative relationship between employees' political ineptness and their job performance, by proposing a mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to unpack the negative relationship between employees' political ineptness and their job performance, by proposing a mediating role of organization-induced emotional exhaustion and a moderating role of perceived organizational unforgiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested with three-round survey data collected among employees and their supervisors across multiple industry sectors.

Findings

Political ineptness diminishes the likelihood that employees undertake performance-enhancing work behaviors because they perceive that their employer is draining their emotional resources. This mediating role of organization-induced emotional exhaustion is particularly salient when they perceive that organizational authorities do not forgive mistakes.

Practical implications

This study reveals a critical risk for employees who find it difficult to exert influence on others: They become complacent in their job duties, which then might further compromise their ability to leave a positive impression on others. This counterproductive process is especially prominent if organizational leaders appear unforgiving.

Originality/value

This study contributes to extant research by explicating an unexplored mechanism (organization-induced emotional exhaustion) and catalyst (organizational unforgiveness) related to the escalation of political ineptness into diminished job performance.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Inam Ul Haq, Dirk De Clercq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

With a basis in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of championing behaviour in the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

With a basis in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of championing behaviour in the relationship between employees’ fear of terror and their job performance, as well as the buffering role of their passion for work, as a personal resource, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

The tests of the hypotheses rely on three-wave, time-lagged data collected from employees and their supervisors in Pakistan.

Findings

An important reason that concerns about terrorist attacks diminish performance is that employees refrain from championing their own entrepreneurial ideas. This mediating role of idea championing is less salient, however, to the extent that employees feel a strong passion for their work.

Practical implications

For human resource managers, this study pinpoints a key mechanism – a reluctance to mobilize active support for entrepreneurial ideas – by which fears about terrorism attacks can spill over into the workplace and undermine employees’ ability to meet their performance requirements. It also reveals how this mechanism can be better contained by the presence of adequate personal resources.

Originality/value

This study adds to burgeoning research on the interplay between terrorism and organizational life by specifying how and when employees’ ruminations about terrorism threats might escalate into diminished performance outcomes at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Dirk De Clercq and Renato Pereira

This study adds to human resource management research by addressing relevant questions about how and when employees' suffering from workplace bullying may direct them away…

Abstract

Purpose

This study adds to human resource management research by addressing relevant questions about how and when employees' suffering from workplace bullying may direct them away from voluntary efforts to improve the organizational status quo. It postulates a mediating role of beliefs about work meaningfulness deprivation, as well as beneficial, moderating roles of two personal resources (resilience and passion for work) in this link.

Design/methodology/approach

The research hypotheses were tested with survey data collected among employees who work in the construction retail sector.

Findings

A critical reason that bullying victims refuse to exhibit change-oriented voluntarism is that they develop beliefs that their organization deprives them of meaningful work, which, as the authors theorize, enables them to protect their self-esteem resources. The extent to which employees can bounce back from challenging situations or feel passionate about work subdues this detrimental effect.

Practical implications

When employees feel upset about being bullied at work, their adverse work conditions may translate into work-related indifference (tarnished change-oriented citizenship), which then compromises employees' and the organization's ability to overcome the difficult situation. Managers should recognize how employees' personal resources can serve as protective shields against this risk.

Originality/value

This study details the detrimental role of demeaning workplace treatment in relation to employees' change-oriented organizational citizenship, as explained by their convictions that their organization operates in ways that make their work unimportant. It is mitigated by energy-enhancing personal resources.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Dirk De Clercq and Renato Pereira

For human resource (HR) managers, the harmful outcomes of employees’ ruminations about external crises, such as a pandemic, represent important, timely concerns. This…

Abstract

Purpose

For human resource (HR) managers, the harmful outcomes of employees’ ruminations about external crises, such as a pandemic, represent important, timely concerns. This research postulates that employees’ perceptions of pandemic threats might diminish the extent to which they engage in change-oriented voluntarism at work. This negative connection may be attenuated by employees’ access to two personal (work-related self-efficacy and organization-based self-esteem) and two relational (goal congruence and interpersonal harmony) resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical predictions are tested with survey data collected among employees who work in a banking organization in Portugal.

Findings

Persistent negative thoughts about a pandemic undermine discretionary efforts to alter and enhance the organizational status quo, but this detrimental effect is mitigated when employees (1) feel confident about their work-related abilities, (2) have a positive self-image about their organizational functioning, (3) share a common mindset with coworkers with respect to work goals and (4) maintain harmonious relationships with coworkers.

Practical implications

This study pinpoints several ways HR managers can reduce the danger that employees’ worries about life-threatening crises may lead to complacent responses that, somewhat paradoxically, might undermine their ability to alleviate the suffered hardships.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to research on the impact of external crisis situations on organizations by providing an explanation of why employees may avoid productive, disruptive work activities, contingent on their access to complementary resources.

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Dirk De Clercq, Tasneem Fatima and Sadia Jahanzeb

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between employees’ experience of interpersonal conflict and their engagement in knowledge hiding, according to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between employees’ experience of interpersonal conflict and their engagement in knowledge hiding, according to a mediating effect of their relatedness need frustration and a moderating effect of their narcissistic rivalry.

Design/methodology/approach

The tests of the hypotheses rely on three-wave, time-lagged data collected among employees in Pakistan.

Findings

A critical reason that emotion-based fights stimulate people to conceal valuable knowledge from their coworkers is that these employees believe their needs for belongingness or relatedness are not being met. This mediating role of relatedness need frustration is particularly salient among employees who are self-centered and see others as rivals, with no right to fight with or give them a hard time.

Practical implications

The findings indicate how organizations might mitigate the risk that negative relationship dynamics among their employees escalate into dysfunctional knowledge hiding behavior. They should work to hire and retain employees who are benevolent and encourage them to see colleagues as allies instead of rivals.

Originality/value

This research unpacks the link between interpersonal conflict and knowledge hiding by explicating the unexplored roles of two critical factors (relatedness need frustration and narcissistic rivalry) in this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Dirk De Clercq and Imanol Belausteguigoitia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how employees’ perceptions of role ambiguity might increase their turnover intentions and how this harmful effect might be…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how employees’ perceptions of role ambiguity might increase their turnover intentions and how this harmful effect might be buffered by employees’ access to relevant individual (innovation propensity), relational (goodwill trust), and organizational (procedural justice) resources. Uncertainty due to unclear role descriptions decreases in the presence of these resources, so employees are less likely to respond to this adverse work situation in the form of enhanced turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data came from a survey of employees of a large organization in the distribution sector.

Findings

Role ambiguity enhances turnover intentions, but this effect diminishes at higher levels of innovation propensity, goodwill trust, and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The findings reveal several contingencies that attenuate the positive effect of role ambiguity on the desire to leave the organization. However, this study relies on the same respondents to assess all the focal variables, and it lacks a direct measure of the mechanisms by which the contingent factors mitigate the relationship between role ambiguity and turnover intentions.

Practical implications

Organizations that fail to provide clear role information to employees can counter the resulting uncertainty with relevant personal, relational, and organizational resources.

Originality/value

This investigation shows how employees’ negative reactions to role ambiguity (turnover intentions) can be mitigated by three uncertainty-reducing resources: personal joy from developing new ideas, the extent to which relationships with colleagues is trustworthy, and perceptions that organizational procedures are fair.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ perceptions of psychological contract violation or sense of organizational betrayal, might diminish their job satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ perceptions of psychological contract violation or sense of organizational betrayal, might diminish their job satisfaction, as well as how their access to two critical personal resources – emotion regulation skills and work-related self-efficacy – might buffer this negative relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Two-wave survey data came from employees of Pakistani-based organizations.

Findings

Perceived contract violation reduces job satisfaction, but the effect is weaker at higher levels of emotion regulation skills and work-related self-efficacy.

Practical implications

For organizations, these results show that the frustrations that come with a sense of organizational betrayal can be contained more easily to the extent that their employees can draw from relevant personal resources.

Originality/value

This investigation provides a more complete understanding of when perceived contract violation will deplete employees’ emotional resources, in the form of feelings of happiness about their job situation. A sense of organizational betrayal is less likely to escalate into reduced job satisfaction when employees can control their negative emotions and feel confident about their work-related competencies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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