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Article

Lisana Lisana

This empirical study aims to determine factors that influence an individual’s intention to use mobile payment (MP) systems. The study investigates direct, indirect and…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study aims to determine factors that influence an individual’s intention to use mobile payment (MP) systems. The study investigates direct, indirect and total effects as well as factors that mediate or moderate effects on intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is derived from previous studies and combines factors from technology acceptance model and unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, social influence, facilitating conditions, behavioral intention) with factors relevant to MP (perceived security, uncertainty avoidance, trust, network externalities and self-efficacy). Gender, age, MP experience and income are included as moderators of direct effects on behavioral intention. The sample includes 736 participants from the four large cities in Indonesia. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze and develop the theoretical model.

Findings

Self-efficacy has the greatest total effect on behavioral intention, followed in decreasing order of importance by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, social influence, trust, network externalities and uncertainty Avoidance. only gender and MP experience have significant moderating effects whereby the direct effects of self-efficacy and network externalities on behavioral intention are influenced by gender and MP experience, respectively. Trust, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use have important mediation effects.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the limited theoretical understanding of MP adoption in Indonesia. New theoretical findings related to mediating and moderating effects, direct, indirect, and total effects are used to discuss important practical implications of the findings.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article

Domenico Dentoni, Glynn T. Tonsor, Roger Calantone and H. Christopher Peterson

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of three credence labels (Australian, animal welfare and grass-fed) on US consumer attitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the direct and indirect effects of three credence labels (Australian, animal welfare and grass-fed) on US consumer attitudes toward buying beef steaks. Furthermore, it explores the impact of consumer attribute knowledge, usage frequency, education and opinion strength on the magnitude of direct and indirect effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through an online experiment with 460 US consumers and analyzed with path modeling.

Findings

The Australian label generates a 86 percent negative direct effect vs a 14 percent negative indirect effect on consumer attitudes, which means that US consumers do not make strong inferences to form their attitudes toward buying Australian beef. The animal welfare label generates 50 percent direct and 50 percent indirect effects. The grass-fed label generates only indirect effects (100 percent). The higher consumer education, attribute knowledge, usage frequency, education and opinion strength, the weaker are the indirect effects of credence labels.

Research limitations/implications

The study focusses on consumers in one country (USA), one product (beef steak) and one label across three attributes, therefore generalization of results is limited.

Practical implications

The study offers a tool to agribusiness managers as well as to policy makers, NGOs and consumer groups to design and assess the effectiveness of communication campaigns attempting to strengthen (or weaken) consumer inferences and attitudes relative to credence labels.

Originality/value

Despite the wide literature on consumer inferences based on credence labels, this is the first study that quantitatively disentangles the complex set of inferential effects generated by credence labels and explores common relationships across multiple credence attributes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Book part

Jan Kees Looise, Nicole Torka and Jan Ekke Wigboldus

Last decades scholars in the field of human resource management (HRM) have intensely examined the contribution of HRM to organizational performance. Despite their efforts…

Abstract

Last decades scholars in the field of human resource management (HRM) have intensely examined the contribution of HRM to organizational performance. Despite their efforts, at least one major research shortcoming can be identified. In general, they have devoted far too little attention to an aspect of HRM potentially beneficial for organizational performance: worker participation, and especially its indirect or representative forms. In contrast, for academics embedded in the industrial relations tradition, worker participation is a prominent theme, even though less emphasized in its relationship with company objectives. One might defend traditional scholars' reservations by arguing that participations main goal concerns workplace democratization and not organizational prosperity. However, several writers state that industrial democracy involving worker participation can channel conflicts of interest between employees and employers and stimulate desired employee attitudes and behavior, consequently enhancing organizational performance (e.g., Gollan, 2006; Ramsay, 1991; Taras & Kaufman, 1999). And, indeed, several studies have shown positive effects of both direct participation (e.g., European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, 1997) and indirect participation (e.g., Addison et al., 2000, 2003; Frick & Möller, 2003) on organizational performance.

Nevertheless, to date, the absence of an integrated model explaining the connection between worker participation and organizational performance leads to the following question that still is in need of an answer: how do direct and indirect forms of participation – separate as well as in combination – affect organizational performance? This chapter aims to contribute to the filling of the aforementioned knowledge gaps. In so doing, we focus on direct and indirect, nonunion participation on the firm level, using a Western European and especially Dutch frame of reference.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-907-4

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Article

Shurui Zhang, Shuo Wang, Lingran Yuan, Xiaoguang Liu and Binlei Gong

This article investigates the mechanism of the direct and indirect effects of epidemics on agricultural production and projects the impact of COVID-19 on agricultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This article investigates the mechanism of the direct and indirect effects of epidemics on agricultural production and projects the impact of COVID-19 on agricultural output in China.

Design/methodology/approach

This article first adopts a dynamic panel model and spatial Durbin model to estimate the direct and indirect effects, followed by a growth accounting method to identify the channels by which epidemics affect agriculture; finally, it projects the overall impact of COVID-19 on agriculture.

Findings

The incidence rate of epidemics in a province has a negative impact on that province's own agricultural productivity, but the increase in the input factors (land, fertilizer and machinery) can make up for the loss and thus lead to insignificant direct effects. However, this “input-offset-productivity” mechanism fails to radiate to the surrounding provinces and therefore leads to significant indirect/spillover effects. It is projected that COVID-19 will lower China's agricultural growth rate by 0.4%–2.0% in 2020 under different scenarios.

Research limitations/implications

It is crucial to establish a timely disclosure and sharing system of epidemic information across provinces, improve the support and resilience of agricultural production in the short run and accelerate the process of agricultural modernization in the long run.

Originality/value

Considering the infectivity of epidemics, this article evaluates the mechanism of the direct and indirect effects by introducing a spatial dynamic model into the growth accounting framework. Moreover, besides the impact on input portfolio and productivity, this article also investigates whether epidemics reshape agricultural production processes due to panic effects and control measures.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article

ALaa Aldin A AL Athmay, Kamel Fantazy and Vinod Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among e-government attributes in terms of social influence, perceived effectiveness, system quality, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among e-government attributes in terms of social influence, perceived effectiveness, system quality, and information quality user satisfaction and intention to use e-government services in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on previous research on e-government services, and has relied partially on Delone and Mclean’s (2004) updated IS success model and the new theoretical and accepted model (UTAUT). These models were used to examine the impact of some selected attributes of e-government on the adoption of e-government services in the UAE from the perspective of a citizen. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from a total of 1,800 e-government users in the UAE and structural equation modeling was utilized to test the theoretical model.

Findings

This study has identified five main findings. First, it provides evidence of the direct effects of e-government attributes on user satisfaction. Second, it provides evidence of the direct effects of user satisfaction on user intention to use e-government services. Third, it provides evidence of the direct effects of e-government attributes on intention to use. Fourth, it demonstrates the positive total effects (direct and indirect) of e-government attributes on the intention to use e-government services in the UAE through user satisfaction. Fifth, two attributes of e-government – system quality and information quality – have emerged as having a strong effect on the intention to use e-government services.

Research limitations/implications

The research study was limited to the UAE geographical region. It would be very interesting to see if there are regional variations when compared to the findings of this research study. The target respondents for this study are internet users. Future research needs to be extended to include both users and nonusers of the internet for the purpose of comparison, and looking at the perception of a technology divide among citizens as a factor influencing citizen intention to adopt e-government services.

Practical implications

This study would help policy makers understand e-government users and to implement policies at large to meet the citzens ' needs of e-government services. The results of the study and the proposed model can be used as a guideline for e-government strategy formulation and implementation for the Government of UAE. The results of the study imply that decision makers of e-government programs should take into considerations these attributes when developing e-government programs because they affect users’ satisfaction and in turn enhances users’ intentions to use e-government services and consequently increase the success of e-government strategic programs.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few studies on e-government adoption in an Arab country and the first study on e-government adoption in the UAE. The paper’s originality and value comes from its theoretical contribution as a first paper in this region to empirically test the impact of some selected variables (social influence, perceived effectiveness, system quality, and information quality) on user satisfaction and intention to adopt e-government services. In contrast to previous research, this paper selected user satisfaction as a mediated, rather than a dependent variable.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article

Fabio Cassia, Nicola Cobelli and Marta Ugolini

Previous research has shown that business-to-business (B2B) brand image has positive effects on customer loyalty. However, the results have been inconsistent because they…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has shown that business-to-business (B2B) brand image has positive effects on customer loyalty. However, the results have been inconsistent because they have highlighted that B2B brand image has either direct or mediated effects on loyalty. Drawing on the framework of service transition, this study aims to develop and test a model that reconciles previous findings. This model suggests that goods-related and service-related B2B brand images coexist in customers’ perceptions and impact customer loyalty in different ways.

Design/methodology/approach

A model was developed and estimated using covariance-based structural equation modeling. The data used in the analysis were collected through a survey in the Italian health-care industry, focusing on the relationship between hearing aid manufacturers and audiologists.

Findings

Both goods-related and service-related B2B brand images have positive effects on loyalty. However, while the effects of goods-related image on loyalty are fully mediated by satisfaction, service-related image has both direct and mediated effects on loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study reconciles previous work arguing that B2B brand image has either direct or mediated effects on loyalty by focusing on the transition from a goods-oriented logic for branding to service branding. In particular, the analysis focuses on the role of the brand in the co-creation process, suggesting that a service-related brand image reflects the value unfolding over time through co-created experiences. However, additional research needs to be conducted in other industries before the results can be generalized.

Practical implications

The findings provide managers with insights for the co-creation of their B2B brand images. In particular, the results urge managers to integrate the traditional goods-oriented approach to branding with service branding, showing that enriching B2B brand image with service-related aspects will have a direct and positive effect on loyalty. However, brand image cannot be created or changed unilaterally by the firm as it is determined by the customer based on co-creation experiences.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explicitly and separately consider the effects of goods-related and service-related aspects of B2B brand image on loyalty. It also is one of the first studies to apply service logic to B2B branding issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part

Laura Alfaro

Among the prominent economic trends in recent decades is the exponential increase in flows of goods and capital driven by technological progress and falling of…

Abstract

Among the prominent economic trends in recent decades is the exponential increase in flows of goods and capital driven by technological progress and falling of restrictions. A key driver of this phenomenon has been the cross-border production, foreign investment, and trade both final and intermediate goods by multinational corporations. Research has sought to understand how foreign direct investment (FDI) affects host economies. This paper reviews the main theories and empirical evidence of two streams of literature: the mechanisms by which multinational activity might create positive effects and externalities to countries and the role of complementary local conditions, also known as “absorptive capacities,” that allow a country to reap the benefits of FDI paying particular attention to the role of factor markets, reallocation effects, and the linkages generated between foreign and domestic firms. The survey focuses mainly on work related to developing countries.

Details

Geography, Location, and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-276-3

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Article

Dennis C.S. Law and Jan H.F. Meyer

The purpose of the present study is to report the initial analyses of relationships between various components of the learning patterns exhibited by a group of 1,572…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to report the initial analyses of relationships between various components of the learning patterns exhibited by a group of 1,572 post‐secondary students in Hong Kong as operationalized via the Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS), a quantitative instrument developed by Vermunt originally for the Dutch higher education context.

Design/methodology/approach

The ILS was adapted and translated into Chinese for the new response‐context. After validation of the ILS scales (results reported in another paper), the possible direct, indirect, or spurious effects among the learning constructs operationalized by these scales were explored using a general theoretical model proposed by Richardson, according to the exhibited statistical significance and magnitude of the beta weights derived from multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Empirical support was found in this new Chinese response‐context for the theoretical model that underpins the ILS. In particular, the findings confirm the central explanatory role of regulation strategies in students’ learning patterns, as originally hypothesized by Vermunt.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the ILS literature by expanding the application of the instrument to a new Chinese response‐context. It is also believed to be the first attempt to adapt Richardson's general theoretical model to analyse the relationships between the ILS components.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article

Štefan Bojnec

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internationalisation of enterprises by specific forms of foreign direct investments (FDI) and international technical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internationalisation of enterprises by specific forms of foreign direct investments (FDI) and international technical cooperation in the defence sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects of defence FDI and international technical cooperation activities on the Slovenian economy are investigated using the input‐output modelling approach.

Findings

The author finds important direct and indirect effects on the Slovenian economy from the FDI and international technical cooperation inflows into enterprises. These positive effects are directly and indirectly linked to enterprises in different statistically classified industrial activities by predominance of the civil sector, which is important for the development of defence and civilian high‐technological base products in different regional parts of Slovenia.

Originality/value

The presented findings can be used to arrange industrial and regional development strategy and policy measures aimed at accelerating the internationalisation of enterprises and different industrial activities.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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