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Article

Dinuka Herath

This paper aims to test the hypothesized concave relationship between disorganization and individual financial performance using UK Workplace Employment Relations Study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the hypothesized concave relationship between disorganization and individual financial performance using UK Workplace Employment Relations Study (WERS) datasets. Given there are no prior studies measuring disorganization we start with using scale items from currently validated scales, WERS, and try to determine the extent to which the current scales are applicable for measuring disorganization and subsequently highlight the limitations of current measures.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the UK Workplace Employment Relations study (WERS) datasets of 2011 which is the largest publicly accessible dataset available. The datasets used were the financial performance survey (FPS) data and the management survey (MS) data with 545 unique records. Polynomial Regression was used to test the hypotheses. An aggregated index for disorganization (IV) was developed, and a production function was used to determine the individual financial performance per worker (DV).

Findings

A significant linear relationship between disorganization and individual financial performance was discovered. However, this relationship was linear and did not exhibit the theorized concave relationship. The findings further indicated the need for more refined measures of disorganization and limitations of the current measures.

Originality/value

While the study is exploratory in nature, this is the first study to date which attempts to measure disorganization in an applied setting. Thus, the work presented here is foundational to any future empirical studies on the topic. The limitations uncovered are of particular importance.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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Article

Peer-Olaf Siebers, Dinuka Herath, Emanuele Bardone, Siavash Farahbakhsh, Peter Gloggengiehser Knudsen, Jens Koed Madsen, Mehwish Mufti, Martin Neumann, Dale Richards, Raffaello Seri and Davide Secchi

This viewpoint article is concerned with an attempt to advance organisational plasticity (OP) modelling concepts by using a novel community modelling framework (PhiloLab…

Abstract

Purpose

This viewpoint article is concerned with an attempt to advance organisational plasticity (OP) modelling concepts by using a novel community modelling framework (PhiloLab) from the social simulation community to drive the process of idea generation. In addition, the authors want to feed back their experience with PhiloLab as they believe that this way of idea generation could also be of interest to the wider evidence-based human resource management (EBHRM) community.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used some workshop sessions to brainstorm new conceptual ideas in a structured and efficient way with a multidisciplinary group of 14 (mainly academic) participants using PhiloLab. This is a tool from the social simulation community, which stimulates and formally supports discussions about philosophical questions of future societal models by means of developing conceptual agent-based simulation models. This was followed by an analysis of the qualitative data gathered during the PhiloLab sessions, feeding into the definition of a set of primary axioms of a plastic organisation.

Findings

The PhiloLab experiment helped with defining a set of primary axioms of a plastic organisation, which are presented in this viewpoint article. The results indicated that the problem was rather complex, but it also showed good potential for an agent-based simulation model to tackle some of the key issues related to OP. The experiment also showed that PhiloLab was very useful in terms of knowledge and idea gathering.

Originality/value

Through information gathering and open debates on how to create an agent-based simulation model of a plastic organisation, the authors could identify some of the characteristics of OP and start structuring some of the parameters for a computational simulation. With the outcome of the PhiloLab experiment, the authors are paving the way towards future exploratory computational simulation studies of OP.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

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Article

Dinuka Herath, Joyce Costello and Fabian Homberg

This paper aims at simulating on how “disorganization” affects team problem solving. The prime objective is to determine how team problem solving varies between an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at simulating on how “disorganization” affects team problem solving. The prime objective is to determine how team problem solving varies between an organized and disorganized environment also considering motivational aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

Using agent-based modeling, the authors use a real-world data set from 226 volunteers at five different types of non-profit organizations in Southwest England to define some attributes of the agents. The authors introduce the concepts of natural, structural and functional disorganization while operationalizing natural and functional disorganization.

Findings

The simulations show that “disorganization” is more conducive for problem solving efficiency than “organization” given enough flexibility (range) to search and acquire resources. The findings further demonstrate that teams with resources above their hierarchical level (access to better quality resources) tend to perform better than teams that have only limited access to resources.

Originality/value

The nuanced categories of “(dis-)organization” allow us to compare between various structural limitations, thus generating insights for improving the way managers structure teams for better problem solving.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

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Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

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Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

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Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

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