Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Aggeliki Konstantoglou, Dimitris Folinas and Thomas Fotiadis

The importance of packaging in the food industry lies in its multifunctional nature. Packaging elements can come from studying the contribution of different research…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of packaging in the food industry lies in its multifunctional nature. Packaging elements can come from studying the contribution of different research disciplines and functional areas: marketing, logistics, food technologies and the environment. The purpose of this study aims to identify and evaluate packaging elements in the food industry from a holistic point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data are collected through two research initiatives via questionnaires, which were filled by 1,219 consumers of food products and 390 managers (executives) working in the packaged food products market, which is a very important and competitive sector in Greece.

Findings

In general, the findings reveal that all the key players in the food supply chain understand and appreciate the multifunctional and multidisciplinary nature of packaging. Moreover, informational, operational, physical and visual elements are all of high importance. These findings lead to the conclusion that all executives from different operational areas of a business should be involved in packaging design, despite the fact that they may have different perspectives concerning the different elements involved in the packaging in the food supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The research confirms that: (1) health and nutrition are two interrelated concepts that receive constant attention from the food industry, as well as from governments and consumers and (2) the quality of a food product is inextricably linked to the quality of its packaging. Naturally, there were also significant differences between the various roles, while differences were also observed in the appreciation of the packaging elements between consumers and executives in the food industry.

Practical implications

The study proves the need for narrowing the gap among managers' perceptions regarding packaging by adopting practices and approaches in an integrated manner.

Social implications

From the analysis of the relevant literature, the authors of the present study note that there is a lack of research concerning the main elements of packaging in the food industry from a holistic point of view. This view will encompass the needs of marketing and logistics managers, food technologists and executives are responsible for environmental issues, as well as the consumers of food products. By identifying the significance that all the above perceive against the various elements of the packaging of retail products, manufacturers can take into consideration the elements that are highly appreciated by both cohorts.

Originality/value

Although the multidisciplinary nature of the package is very clear, most studies in the literature focus on either its impact on consumer behavior and its use as a communication/differentiation tool or as a tool that has significant implications for the efficiency of the logistics systems throughout the supply chain, as well as for the particular features/properties and the environmental awareness. This study sought to fill the abovementioned gap, by recognizing its importance among marketing, logistics, food technology and corporate social responsibility managers, including issues concerning environmental awareness, and how consumers perceive the data on the packaging.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Maro Vlachopoulou, Vicky Manthou and Dimitris Folinas

The establishment of an integrated Partner Relationship Management (PRM) system can potentially address several aspects of channel collaboration in a digital environment…

Abstract

The establishment of an integrated Partner Relationship Management (PRM) system can potentially address several aspects of channel collaboration in a digital environment and offers a wide range of benefits to the members of the logistics networks. In this paper, a logistics partnerships typology is suggested related to the channel management in a virtual environment. Fur ther more, the basic components and an architectural platform of an integrated E‐Logistics PRM solution are designed. The proposed integrated e‐Logistics PRM solution offers a systematic process for ensuring that specific partnerships criteria are developed and managed in the most beneficial way.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Dimitris Folinas, Ioannis Manikas and Basil Manos

The main objectives of the paper are to identify the needs in data that are considered as fundamental for the efficient food traceability and to introduce a generic…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objectives of the paper are to identify the needs in data that are considered as fundamental for the efficient food traceability and to introduce a generic framework (architecture) of traceability data management that will act as guideline for all entities/food business operators involved.

Design/methodology/approach

The traceability system introduced is based on the implementation of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) technology. In the first stage, the necessary traceability data are identified and categorized. In the second stage, the selected data are transformed and inserted into a five‐element generic framework/model, using PML (Physical Markup Language), which is a standard technology of XML.

Findings

The assessment of information communication and diffusion underlines that the particular model is simple in use and user‐friendly, by enabling information flow through conventional technologies.

Practical implications

The main feature of this framework is the simplicity in use and the ability of communicating information through commonly accessible means such as the internet, e‐mail, and cell phones. This makes it particularly easy to use, even when it comes to the base of the supply chains (farmers, fishermen, cattle breeders, etc).

Originality/value

An integrated traceability system must be able to file and communicate information regarding product quality and origin, and consumer safety. The main features of such a system include adequate “filtering” of information, information extracting, from already existed databases, harmonization with international codification standards, internet standards and up to date technologies. The framework presented in this paper fulfills all the above features.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Dimitris Folinas, Vicky Manthou, Marianna Sigala and Maro Vlachopoulou

Supply chain management (SCM) is an integrating philosophy to manage the total flow of materials, information and finance from supplier to ultimate customer. The goal of…

Abstract

Supply chain management (SCM) is an integrating philosophy to manage the total flow of materials, information and finance from supplier to ultimate customer. The goal of SCM is to meet the needs of the final consumer by supplying the right product at the right place, time and price. Companies use SCM as a way to meet the competitive challenges of today's business environment. The focus of SCM has shifted from engineering efficient functional processes to the co‐ordination of activities in a supply chain network. The aim of this paper is to examine the stages in the evolution of the supply chain to an electronic supply chain. To illustrate and support the types of evolutionary progress involved, best practices and case studies are provided and analysed.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Premkumar Rajagopal, Suhaiza Zailani and Mohamed Sulaiman

Supply chain partnering (SCP) in internationally operating companies is still not adequately addressed in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain partnering (SCP) in internationally operating companies is still not adequately addressed in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors towards effective SCP across two organizations of different origins (Company A and Company B).

Design/methodology/approach

The central issue is to investigate how information flow, organizational linkage, supply chain infrastructure, and resource sharing exhibit themselves in the SCP through a case study method.

Findings

The interviews reveal that Company B tends to be a reluctant player and is far more skeptical about the benefits afforded through such a relationship. It can also be concluded that Company B is less interested in the benefits gained and is more likely to highlight the risks associated with heightened dependence on a smaller number of suppliers. On the one hand, it can be stated that Company B thinks about the gains afforded by partnering supply chains but is more easily swayed by traditional purchasing metrics related to cost or initial purchase prices. On another level, Company A seems to fully participate in SCP efforts and sees the benefit from such a relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews are necessary for developing basis understanding on how companies implement SCP, especially to examine the factors that contribute to its successful. The study suggests that larger number of sample need be used.

Practical implications

From the case study, it is believed that firms appear to confirm a positive and significant relationship between the degree of resource sharing and organizational linkage, if they see that scalable partnering efforts as hypothesized are workable.

Originality/value

The case study highlights is the important role of the partnering to support supply chain process and to deliver high‐quality service. This is important because the profitability and survival of the chains depend on how well partnering concept been implemented.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5