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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Dima Jamali, Yasmeen Makarem and Alberto Willi

Anchored in institutional theory and sense-making theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the multinational…

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Abstract

Purpose

Anchored in institutional theory and sense-making theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the implementation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) at the multinational corporations (MNC) subsidiary level in a developing country context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows a qualitative methodology and adopts the interview technique to investigate the CSR practices of eight MNCs.

Findings

The results suggest that the CSR diffusion process goes well beyond simple imitation (i.e. adopting CSR myths or best practices intact), involving complex processes of interpretation and translation at the subsidiary level to reconcile the multiple and contradictory expectations for CSR.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the dynamics of the sense-making process at the level of the subsidiary and the numerous institutional factors that are accounted for while implementing CSR activities in the host community. This paper argues that the integration of the two theories helps bridge macro and micro levels of analysis, thus providing a much richer account of how organizational actors at the subsidiary level make “sense” of a multitude of institutional pressures in the process of CSR implementation stemming from within the MNC itself on one hand (and the respective home country) and from the host community on the other hand.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Morteza Khojastehpour and Dima Jamali

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a new trend that has swept the world of business by storm. With globalization proceeding unabated and CSR acquiring global interest and…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a new trend that has swept the world of business by storm. With globalization proceeding unabated and CSR acquiring global interest and resonance, examining how companies can make adaptations to their CSR in an international context becomes a timely and important issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on institutional theory, this study aims to identify three types of host country institutional complexity that accompany the internationalization process, namely, cultural, regulatory and economic, hence necessitating nuanced CSR adaptations in context and as illustrated in this paper requiring different tailoring and adaptation of CSR programs and interventions between developed and developing countries.

Findings

The authors propose a series of research propositions for exploration toward broadening and deepening the understanding of the above institutional complexities and the necessity of CSR tailoring and adaptation to accompany the internationalization process.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to highlight the necessity of CSR tailoring in the context of the internationalization process while considering host country institutional complexity highlighting nuanced differences between developed and developing country landscapes and implications for how multinational corporations should approach CSR in these differentiated environments.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Dima Jamali, Georges Samara, Lamberto Zollo and Cristiano Ciappei

Drawing on signaling theory and adopting a multilevel approach, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how meso-organizational attributes interact with the macro cultural…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on signaling theory and adopting a multilevel approach, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how meso-organizational attributes interact with the macro cultural context to affect employees’ behavioral responses to internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. This study unpacks the behavioral process through which internal CSR affects employees’ organizational citizenship behavior in an organization that has obtained SA8000 and that operates in an understudied Italian context characterized by high individualism and masculinity.

Design/methodology/approach

Bootstrapped multi-mediation analysis was used on a sample of 300 employees operating in one of the most important and largest Italian retail stores active in the food industry and involved in socio-environmental responsibility.

Findings

Results show that when a company obtains an internal CSR quality credential, particularly SA8000, an auditable certification standard that signals that a company goes beyond compliance standards to tailor to the well-being of its employees, it will likely attract like-minded employees that will positively react to internal CSR initiatives even when operating in a highly individualistic and masculine culture such as Italy.

Originality/value

While prior research has shown that internal CSR initiatives have a lower and, in some cases, an insignificant impact on employees’ behavioral outcomes in cultures characterized by individualism and masculinity, this study shows that the interaction between the cultural setting and company specific attributes can turn this effect to be significant, strong, and positive.

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2023

Ali Raza, Muhammad Ishtiaq Ishaq, Dima R. Jamali, Haleema Zia and Narjes Haj-Salem

This study aims to assess the direct impact of workplace hazing and the indirect impact via moral disengagement on organizational deviance behavior and negative word-of-mouth…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the direct impact of workplace hazing and the indirect impact via moral disengagement on organizational deviance behavior and negative word-of-mouth (WOM) communication in the hospitality industry of Pakistan. This research also addresses the significance of psychological (resilience) and social factors (friendship prevalence) as moderators of the relationship between workplace hazing and moral disengagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multirespondent strategy, the data was collected from 319 newcomers employed in the Pakistani hospitality industry and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that workplace hazing increases moral disengagement, organizational deviance and negative WOM communication. Moreover, various psychological factors can significantly decrease and mediate the negative influence of workplace hazing on moral disengagement.

Practical implications

The managers should explicitly and formally handle the workplace hazing issues like harassment and bullying to build a positive working environment for newcomers.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in determining the significance of workplace hazing and its impact on moral disengagement, organizational deviance and negative WOM communication. Also, this study contributes to the literature by examining either social or psychological factors that play an important role in dampening the negative impact of workplace hazing.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Dima Jamali

The book chapter sheds light on specific institutional variables that have been shaping and molding corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and expressions in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The book chapter sheds light on specific institutional variables that have been shaping and molding corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and expressions in the developing world. It argues that CSR strategies cannot be detached from context, and that institutional constellations exert serious pressure on CSR expressions in developing countries, which continue to take a largely philanthropic form. The chapter then dwells on how to transition from CSR as philanthropy to a more strategic approach and the important agency role of founders and top managers in enacting this transition.

Approach

This book chapter highlights the context-dependence of CSR practices and provides illustrations from the Middle East context and other developing countries. It adopts a mostly secondary review of available literature on the topic. It also outlines some guidelines about how to move beyond philanthropy that is largely prevalent in the developing countries to a more strategic approach, that is aligned with strategy and core competence (inside-out strategic approach) or relevant and pressing social needs in the country (outside-in strategic approach).

Findings

Institutional variables include cultural and religious systems, the nature of political systems, the nature of socioeconomic systems and priorities, as well as the institutional pressures exerted by other institutional actors, inclusive of development and welfare agencies, trade unions, business associations, and civil society organizations. National institutional environments such as weak and contracted governments, gaps in public governance and transparency, arbitrary enforcement of rules, regulations, and policies, and low levels of safety and labor standards affect how CSR is conceived and practiced in developing countries. Hence, CSR continues to be equated with philanthropy in the developing world, and substantive engagement with CSR is the exception rather than the norm.

Social implications

To take CSR to the next level in developing countries, we need to accord systematic attention to strengthening the institutional drivers of CSR, and putting more pressure on companies to move beyond philanthropy, rhetoric, legitimization, imagery, and public relations to substantive engagement in CSR and genuine attempts at change and development. Practical guidelines and implications in relation to how to transition to a more strategic approach to CSR are provided.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability: Emerging Trends in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-152-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2016

Sameer Azizi and Dima Jamali

– The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of CSR in Afghanistan as a novel context in the South-Asian CSR debate.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of CSR in Afghanistan as a novel context in the South-Asian CSR debate.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings of the paper are based on case studies of four corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. Multiple sources of qualitative data are coded according to the analytical framework of the paper to generate the findings.

Findings

The findings highlight that the Afghan national setting can be conceptualised as an “area of limited statehood” indicating the weak national institutional setting, which enables space for manoeuvring for non-state actors to play a pivotal role in business-society relations. The paper highlights that the CSR practices are driven by the multi-level organisational field that through a unique blend of global coercive, mimetic and normative pressures lead to convergence around explicit CSR themes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on CSR practices that are explicitly stated and do not include informal and/or implicit business-society practices in such contexts.

Originality/value

This paper combines the literature on areas of limited statehood and the neo-institutional theory to explain the emergence of CSR the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. The paper advocates for a shift from a national setting focus to a multi-level institutional field lens in providing contextualised explanation of the emergence of CSR in developing countries.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Nisar Ahmad, Hamza Smajić, Ramo Palalic and Said Al-Riyami

This paper presents a citation-based systematic literature review in the field of sustainability management for Arab countries. The aim is to assist potential researchers in this…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a citation-based systematic literature review in the field of sustainability management for Arab countries. The aim is to assist potential researchers in this field to identify existing themes, gaps and other relevant information necessary for the further development of the research area.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive list of keywords has been searched in the SCOPUS database to identify all the relevant articles in the field of sustainability management in Arab countries. After applying the relevant restriction criteria, manual screening of titles, abstracts and keywords was performed to identify the final sample. The final sample consists of 410 articles published in 218 different journals by 907 authors. Bibliometrix R-tool was used to conduct a comprehensive bibliometric analysis of the selected articles.

Findings

Findings indicate a growing trend of publications on sustainability management in the generally understudied Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Besides publication trends, citation analysis presents citation trends, most influential journals and authors, and most cited articles on sustainability management in Arab countries. Theme identification is shown through analyses of conceptual and intellectual structures. Finally, social networks in the field are discussed.

Practical implications

Information presented in this paper informs interested researchers about the current state in the field, relevant sources of knowledge, important literature on the topic, relevant authors and other valuable particulars. This systematic literature review helps researchers make further valuable contributions to the field of sustainability management in Arab countries.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this paper offers a first comprehensive citation-based systematic literature review on sustainability management in Arab countries.

Details

Management & Sustainability: An Arab Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-9819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Gideon Jojo Amos

This paper aims to present a systematic review of scholarly articles focused on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries and published during the period 2004…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a systematic review of scholarly articles focused on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries and published during the period 2004 to 2014 in international journals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applied a bibliometric analysis to 101 articles on CSR research focused on developing countries.

Findings

The study confirms that the most prevalent CSR themes addressed in journals have been social issues, followed by environmental issues in a distant second, with ethics-related issues receiving the least attention. Also, as CSR research in developing countries constitutes an emerging stream of literature, an overwhelming dominance of empirical (qualitative) papers aimed at exploring and/or seeking interpretations to CSR motivations have been confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

An important limitation of this study is in relation to the methods applied. In the first place, this review is based on two electronic databases: ABI/INFORM Global (ProQuest) and Web of Science Core Collection: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED). This means that research published in international journals that are not included in either of these databases will be omitted.

Practical implications

This review provides useful guidance for future CSR research focused on developing countries thereby providing a foundation for future research in this stream of CSR research.

Social implications

The findings of this study suggest that much CSR knowledge in developing countries reflects the unique social issues that call for companies to adopt different CSR interventions when operating in developing countries.

Originality/value

Although this paper is not the first to systematically review CSR research, but it is one of the initial attempts, to the best of the knowledge, to systematically review the state of CSR knowledge in the context of developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Dima Jamali, Mohammad Hallal and Hanin Abdallah

Sound corporate governance is now a mainstream issue of concern in the business world. However, there has been no systematic investigation of corporate governance practices in the

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Abstract

Purpose

Sound corporate governance is now a mainstream issue of concern in the business world. However, there has been no systematic investigation of corporate governance practices in the healthcare sector. Allowing for a distinction between two types of healthcare organizations (profit and non‐profit), this paper aims to investigate nuances in the application of sound governance principles across different types of healthcare organizations in the context of a developing country, together with differing understanding and applications of corporate social responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a qualitative interpretive methodology, comprising in‐depth interviews with top hospital executives drawn from 21 Lebanese hospitals representing both the profit and non‐profit varieties.

Findings

The findings suggest some basic governance differences between for‐profit and non‐profit hospitals in terms of managerial structure, ownership and the role of the board of directors, as well as differing orientations towards corporate social responsibility. There is a general lack of understanding and application of corporate governance best practices in family‐owned, for‐profit hospitals, whereas non‐profit hospitals are more in line with corporate governance best practices, and more attuned to corporate social responsibility.

Originality/value

This paper presents fresh insights into applications of corporate governance and corporate social responsibility principles in a very important sector that has not received systematic attention and consideration in the literature.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Peter Lund-Thomsen, Dima Jamali and Antonio Vives

This paper aims to analyze the potential and limitations of donor-financed management tools that seek to promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) in small and medium-sized…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the potential and limitations of donor-financed management tools that seek to promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in developing countries. Drawing on key insights from three streams of literature relating to institutional theory, critical perspectives on CSR in developing countries and the literature on CSR and SMEs in the developing world, the potential and limits of donor-financed management tools aimed at promoting CSR in developing country SMEs are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Using official UN and Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development lists of all multilateral and bilateral donor agencies, 38 donors that might have produced such CSR tools were identified. The authors contacted them via e-mail and/or telephone, and conducted an extensive Internet search with the aim of identifying whether they had developed management tools aimed at promoting CSR in SMEs in developing countries. The authors then scrutinized the contents of the 11 tools identified and examined the extent to which these tools accord attention to contextual differences and specific peculiarities of institutional environments in developing countries; the extent to which these tools account for the silent or sunken aspects of CSR which have been prominently highlighted in the SME – CSR literature; and the extent to which these tools accord attention to the paramount concern for poverty alleviation in developing countries.

Findings

Overall, the analysis testifies to the continued predominant orientation of these tools to the context of larger firms in developed countries, with insufficient tailoring or customization to the specific realities of SMEs in the South.

Research limitations/implications

In-depth interviews with aid agency personnel, SMEs, workers or community members were not conducted. Hence, this study should be seen as an initial, exploratory desk study of the potential and limits of management tools aimed at promoting CSR in SMEs in the developing world.

Practical implications

It is suggested that donor agencies could develop such tools in a bottom-up fashion by first mapping the silent CSR practices of SMEs in developing countries and then use this as a basis for strengthening existing CSR activities in SMEs instead of trying to impose new priorities from the outside. This might enhance the local relevance and applicability of these management tools.

Originality/value

The study is likely to be the first analysis of the potential and limits of management tools that are developed by donor agencies with the aim of promoting CSR in SMEs in developing countries.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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