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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Kati Suomi, Päivikki Kuoppakangas, Ulla Hytti, Charles Hampden-Turner and Jukka Kangaslahti

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the dilemmas that challenge reputation management in the context of higher education (HE).

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1587

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dilemmas that challenge reputation management in the context of higher education (HE).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces one Finnish multidisciplinary master's degree programme as a case in point. The empirical data comprises a student survey and semi-structured interviews with internal and external stakeholders whose work relates to the master's degree programme in question.

Findings

The findings identify different types of dilemmas arising from collaboration between stakeholders of HE.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates how the dilemma-reconciliation method can be used to enhance reputation management in HE.

Originality/value

The novelty of the paper is in applying dilemma theory (Hampden-Turner and Trompenaars, 2000) in parallel with reputation theories. Dilemma theory attributes reputation risks to conflicting aims.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Vilma Zydziunaite, Daiva Lepaite, Päivi Åstedt-Kurki and Tarja Suominen

– The purpose of this paper is to characterize issues related to head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas.

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1679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to characterize issues related to head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative descriptive, in which researchers stay close to the data. The data were collected in the format of unstructured written reflections. Inductive conventional latent qualitative content analysis was applied to the data.

Findings

The issues of head nurses’ management of decision making in ethical dilemmas relate to the following aspects: taking risks in deviating from the formalities, balancing power and humaneness, maintaining the professional hierarchy, managing resistance to change, managing with limited options, and experiencing the decline of nurse’s professional and/or human dignity.

Research limitations/implications

Reflections in written form were preferred to semi-structured interviews and the researchers were unable to contact the participants directly and to ask additional questions. All the reflections were produced in a language other than English.

Practical implications

The issues of head nurses’ management of decision making in ethical dilemmas reveal the gap between societal expectations and the opportunities to improve nursing leadership in health care organizations.

Social implications

The issues of head nurses’ decision making when managing ethical dilemmas are related to contexts that reflect the attitudes of society and health care system toward nursing management.

Originality/value

The study adds to the understanding of issues of the management of decision making in ethical dilemmas. It is an ongoing systematic process that encourages head nurses to learn from practice and manage the quality of care by empowering themselves and nurses to take responsibility for leadership.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Carol Cardno and Bronwyn Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to examine dilemmas encountered by kindergarten head teachers with the further aim of developing their capability to recognise and resolve…

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2040

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine dilemmas encountered by kindergarten head teachers with the further aim of developing their capability to recognise and resolve “leadership dilemmas”.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research was used to conduct a three‐phase study involving 16 kindergarten head teachers and six system managers (within the Auckland region). A reconnaissance phase investigated the nature of perceived dilemmas and typical responses. In the second phase, an intervention that provided participants with both the theory and practice skills was implemented. A third phase of research evaluated the extent to which change had occurred.

Findings

The reconnaissance phase findings (pre‐learning questionnaire) confirm the incidence of dilemmas in kindergarten settings. The data show that, while leaders could identify issues that signalled the presence of dilemmas, they were unable to articulate leadership dilemmas clearly or confront them successfully. A professional development intervention was evaluated using a post‐learning questionnaire. There is evidence that these leaders were better able to recognise and articulate the leadership dilemmas they encountered in performance management settings. The findings show that participants are able to analyse their responses to these dilemmas by relating these to the theory base and indicating where they believe there is need for further learning. In summary, the intervention did change participants' practice but the study is limited by its inability to gauge internalisation of learning and study its implementation. For this to occur another cycle of action research is required.

Originality/value

The paper is original in that it studies the practices of leaders in relation to resolving dilemmas which arise when leaders manage the performance of staff. If leaders have an understanding of the theory and skills they need to address these tension‐laden problems, they could positively influence the quality of teaching and learning through leadership practices.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Carol Cardno

The failure of schools between 1990 and 1995, to respond to the imperative to establish systems for staff appraisal resulted in the Ministry of Education in New Zealand…

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1770

Abstract

The failure of schools between 1990 and 1995, to respond to the imperative to establish systems for staff appraisal resulted in the Ministry of Education in New Zealand prescribing guidelines for schools to follow from 1996 onwards. This paper explores forces which shaped national policy in the framework of the reform movement, describes the policy development process and a national training programme for its introduction and examines challenges presented for principals who are expected to be accountable for policy implementation. National policy (which frames problems and solutions in structural terms) is analysed to show how it can fail to address dilemmas at the heart of staff appraisal activity. Problems inherent in attempting to mesh dual purposes of appraisal are identified, and the requirements of a “dilemma management” approach are explained in relation to the role of the principal.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Ulla Hytti, Päivikki Kuoppakangas, Kati Suomi, Chris Chapleo and Massimo Giovanardi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how healthcare professionals understand a new organisational brand and examine the ideas discussed in relation to it within…

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1602

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how healthcare professionals understand a new organisational brand and examine the ideas discussed in relation to it within healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a discursive approach that facilitates understanding how the informants perceived a new organisation brand and how that might shape their activities in the enterprise.

Findings

The study identified four distinct interpretative repertoires: the organisational brand as an economic solution, the magic wand, the factory and a servant to the customer. The new brand was understood in terms of economic and business-like functions marked by external branding and its signs (logos, etc.). The brand is not communicated to patients or colleagues and the factory metaphor is applied to work practices. Hence, several potential dilemmas arise concerning the brand promise, customer expectations, economic and efficiency gains and the professional values of employees.

Research limitations/implications

Adoption of private-sector practices in semi-public or public-sector organisations is common. This study focuses on how private-sector ideas diffuse into the organisations and how they are translated within them.

Practical implications

The authors suggest a stronger emphasis on internal branding as a reconciliation to enhance legitimacy, high-quality customer service and staff wellbeing.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the unique contribution of the study is drawing upon healthcare branding, dilemma theory and discursive institutionalism in its interpretation. Consequently, it demonstrates how ideas about the brand and public healthcare are translated and communicated in the examined discourses and how those ideas reconstruct understanding and change behaviour within the organisations.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Truphena Oduol and Sue Cornforth

The purpose of this paper is to question the usefulness of Euro-Western concepts of principled ethical behaviour for school leaders in non-Euro-Western countries by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to question the usefulness of Euro-Western concepts of principled ethical behaviour for school leaders in non-Euro-Western countries by examining the dilemmas faced by Kenyan educational leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A single, multi-site case study methodological approach was used, and data gathered by means of semi-structured interviews with stakeholders: school principals, boards of governors, heads of department, school bursars and parents.

Findings

Findings highlighted the importance of contextual variables in influencing leaders’ decisions, indicative of the tension between liberal and communitarian ethical approaches. Although similar dilemmas were encountered to those working in euro-western contexts, Kenyan educational leaders faced the additional challenge of working with cultural values of Ubuntu: care for the whole community, harmonious working relationships, loyalty to one’s kin and respect of seniority. Furthermore, the problems they encountered were often life-threatening resulting from poverty, and HIV/Aids.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on ethics in educational leadership by proposing that the adoption of euro-western ethical standards and perspectives in non-Euro-Western countries is problematic, unless mitigated by a dialogic approach.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

Gerry Johnson

The article analyses some of the reasons for the difficulties in designing and managing channels of distribution. In particular it argues that an important dilemma likely…

Abstract

The article analyses some of the reasons for the difficulties in designing and managing channels of distribution. In particular it argues that an important dilemma likely to be faced by channel managers is the potential conflict between maintaining stable channel relationships whilst seeking to take advantage of channel opportunities.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Akiebe Humphrey Ahworegba

The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the dilemma of institutional duality (ID) confronting multinational corporations and to propose a workable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the dilemma of institutional duality (ID) confronting multinational corporations and to propose a workable solution for this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has searched the literature using several terms directly related to the dilemma of ID and multinational firms.

Findings

The findings reveal that to attain “legitimacy”, subsidiaries strive to balance institutional pressures stemming from external environments in the host country and their parent organizations. Understanding institutional theories of multinational corporations enables the subsidiaries to manage external pressures. ID impact varies among subsidiaries, depending on institutional contexts and internal strategies of subsidiaries.

Originality/value

An “institutional duality incidence model” portraying how dual institutions make “legitimacy” problematic for subsidiaries is proposed. A framework for identifying factors generating ID dilemma and their management approach is also proposed. It is concluded that a multinational corporation that recognizes ID as a central concern is more likely to achieve and maintain a higher level of harmony with its subsidiaries and host countries.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jan Mouritsen, Tage Skjøtt‐Larsen and Herbert Kotzab

Supply chain management (SCM) is becoming a popular concept both in research and in practice. At the EurOMA Conference in Copenhagen in 2002 many papers focused on SCM as…

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7036

Abstract

Supply chain management (SCM) is becoming a popular concept both in research and in practice. At the EurOMA Conference in Copenhagen in 2002 many papers focused on SCM as a research topic. Similarly, an increasing number of companies are establishing positions as supply chain managers. SCM is also a popular theme for trade journals and management conferences. The quest for integration is an explicit or implicit assumption in most literature within SCM. The basic hypothesis is “the more integration – the better the management of the chain”. This article discusses what the term “management” in the concept of SCM stands for. The integration assumption as a “cure all” prescription for SCM is challenged, and questions raised as to when it is possible and desirable to exercise management in supply chains. The main thesis is that it depends very much on the “environment” of the supply chain and the power relations between the participants in the supply chain.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Meike Tilebein

The primary objective of this paper is to discuss whether complexity science can help overcome management's dilemma of how to balance efficiency and innovation.

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2359

Abstract

Purpose

The primary objective of this paper is to discuss whether complexity science can help overcome management's dilemma of how to balance efficiency and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Complexity science provides an interdisciplinary theoretical approach for studying complex adaptive systems (CAS), which exhibit adequate combinations of both emergent efficiency and emergent innovation. Based on prominent models from complexity science, a generic framework of CAS is proposed that shows the design levers of such systems. This framework then serves to assess recent literature on applications of complexity science to firms. Applications cover a broad range of objectives and four organizational levels: the individual resource, the organizational sub‐unit (SU), the organizational, and the network levels. The generic framework is used to classify the applications' objectives in terms of efficiency and innovation, and to identify the design levers they use.

Findings

CAS offer a valuable theoretical perspective on efficiency and innovation. However, the proposed framework shows that these systems are not utilized to their full potential when applied to firms. Typical applications address either emergent efficiency or emergent innovation and thus fail to balance both.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not provide an exhaustive literature review on management applications of CAS, but selects exemplary literature.

Originality/value

The paper gives a comprehensive overview of the CAS' perspective in management science. For further research, the proposed generic framework of CAS may serve to analyze, evaluate and integrate applications in order to overcome the efficiency‐innovation dilemma.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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