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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Christina Louise Romero-Ivanova, Paul Cook and Greta Faurote

This study centers on high school pre-teacher education students’ reviews of their peers’ digital stories. The purpose of this study is twofold: to bring digital

Abstract

Purpose

This study centers on high school pre-teacher education students’ reviews of their peers’ digital stories. The purpose of this study is twofold: to bring digital storytelling to the forefront as a literacy practice within classrooms that seeks to privilege students’ voices and experiences and also to encapsulate the authors’ different experiences and perspectives as teachers. The authors sought to understand how pre-teacher education candidates analyzed, understood and made meaning from their classmates’ digital stories using the seven elements of digital storytelling (Dreon et al., 2011).

Design/methodology/approach

Using grounded theory (Charmaz, 2008) as a framework, the question of how do high school pre-teacher education program candidates reflectively peer review their classmates’ digital stories is addressed and discussed through university and high school instructors’ narrative reflections. Through peer reviews of their fellow classmates’ digital stories, students were able to use the digital storytelling guide that included the seven elements of digital storytelling planning to critique and offer suggestions. The authors used the 2018–2019 and 2019–2020 cohorts’ digital stories, digital storytelling guides and peer reviews to discover emerging categories and themes and then made sense of these through narrative analysis. This study looks at students’ narratives through the contexts of peer reviews.

Findings

The seven elements of digital storytelling, as noted by Dreon et al. (2011, p. 5), which are point of view, dramatic question, emotional content, the gift of your voice, the power of the soundtrack, economy and pacing, were used as starting points for coding students’ responses in their evaluations of their peers’ digital stories. Situated on the premise of 21st century technologies as important promoters of differentiated ways of teaching and learning that are highly interactive (Greenhow et al., 2009), digital stories and students’ reflective practices of peer reviewing were the foundational aspects of this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The research the authors have done has been in regards to reviewing and analyzing students’ peer reviews of their classmates’ digital stories, so the authors did not conduct a research study empirical in nature. What the authors have done is to use students’ artifacts (digital story, digital storytelling guides and reflections/peer reviews) to allow students’ authentic voices and perspectives to emerge without their own perspectives marring these. The authors, as teachers, are simply the tools of analysis.

Practical implications

In reading this paper, teachers of different grade levels will be able to obtain ideas on using digital storytelling in their classrooms first. Second, teachers will be able to obtain hands-on tools for implementing digital storytelling. For example, the digital storytelling guide to which the authors refer (Figure 1) can be used in different subject areas to help students plan their stories. Teachers will also be able to glean knowledge on using students’ peer reviews as a kind of authentic assessment.

Social implications

The authors hope in writing and presenting this paper is that teachers and instructors at different levels, K-12 through higher education, will consider digital storytelling as a pedagogical and learning practice to spark deeper conversations within the classroom that flow beyond margins and borders of instructional settings out into the community and beyond. The authors hope that others will use opportunities for storytelling, digital, verbal, traditional writing and other ways to spark conversations and privilege students’ voices and lives.

Originality/value

As the authors speak of the original notion of using students’ crucial events as story starters, this is different than prior research for digital storytelling that has focused on lesson units or subject area content. Also, because the authors have used crucial events, this is an entry point to students’ lives and the creation of rapport within the classroom.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Fariba Nosrati and Brian Detlor

This research responds to a growing interest among cultural organizations regarding how to use emerging digital technologies in the communication of cultural content. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This research responds to a growing interest among cultural organizations regarding how to use emerging digital technologies in the communication of cultural content. The need to investigate various aspects of digital transformation for cultural organizations has been heightened during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This paper explores how city cultural organizations can utilize digital stories for impression management to enhance public perceptions of a city. The aim of this study is to understand how end-users are affected by a city cultural digital storytelling information system and the benefits of using such a system.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive case study was conducted on a digital storytelling initiative carried out by three cultural organizations in a medium-sized city in Canada. Data collection included 95 interviews with the general public, questionnaires and the gathering of documents.

Findings

Findings suggest that digital storytelling can be a viable tool to share city cultural heritage information and positively affect end-user perceptions of a city. The overall outcome of creating/maintaining a positive favorable impression is shaped through a layered experience of benefits by users. Through digital stories, users are first personally engaged and informed about a city's cultural heritage, and then they are influenced and inspired positively toward the city. Further, factors, such as leisure learning, cultural heritage information and cultural organizations, situate this context of use.

Originality/value

The study sheds light on how the art of storytelling in the digital age can serve as a powerful tool for conveying information effectively and influencing public perceptions. This paper provides a context-specific model to understand the use of digital storytelling by city cultural organizations for the purpose of impression management. Theoretical insights and practical recommendations are provided to explore the utilization of digital storytelling for raising interest and awareness in a city and managing public perceptions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Mohamed Melwani, Lee Yong Tay and Cher Ping Lim

This chapter reports on an ethnographic case study of how a group of elementary school teachers designed technology enhanced learning with mobile technology (e.g…

Abstract

This chapter reports on an ethnographic case study of how a group of elementary school teachers designed technology enhanced learning with mobile technology (e.g. notebooks, tablet computers and mobile phones) to facilitate students’ development of literacy and twenty-first century competencies. These teachers designed the school’s literacy pedagogical approach, leveraging the use of technology, namely digital storytelling. The school in this case study is one of the eight Future Schools in Singapore under the FutureSchools@Singapore program. The school has been providing one-to-one mobile computing learning devices and wireless Internet access for its students. The introduction of technology in the classroom makes it possible for twenty-first century competencies to be integrated into literacy development. The conversational framework is used as a framework to examine how the design of the digital storytelling pedagogical approach brings about the various teaching–learning activities – acquisition, inquiry, practice, production, discussion and collaboration. The use of digital storytelling as an approach to integrate information communication technology (ICT) into the classroom has not only modified how ICT is being used in the school, it has redefined how ICT could be used to engage young learners. It has fundamentally transformed conventional storytelling with the use of current state-of-the-shelf (i.e. easily and widely available) technologies. This case study also outlines the processes involved in improving the design of digital storytelling over the years by the teachers. The ecosystem of the school is also taken into consideration and described in detail. Findings suggest the importance of the collaborative efforts of the teachers in the continuous improvements made to this design. The adoption of a learning design framework, such as the one used in this study, can be beneficial to ensure a systematic approach to the design of learning. In addition, the availability of technological infrastructure and computing devices are necessary for the seamless use of technology in the classroom. The just-in-time learning approach is adopted for students to learn technology as they are developing their digital stories.

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Mobile Technologies in Children’s Language and Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-879-6

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Suzanna K. Conrad

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible purposes of digital storytelling and discuss practical implementation in a community-based digital storytelling project.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible purposes of digital storytelling and discuss practical implementation in a community-based digital storytelling project.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study investigates the function of digital storytelling for archiving local history, specifically by journaling experiences during a digital storytelling grant project at a public library in Southern California.

Findings

This case study details a specific example of the impact digital storytelling can have on a community, both to foster community building and also to encourage documentation of local history. The main goal of the project was to present and archive filmed stories from local community members; however, the project also led to increased awareness of digital storytelling and the associated technology both within the library and the greater community.

Practical implications

This article should provide best practice guidelines for administering a community-based digital storytelling project including suggestions for outreach to the larger community, dealing with technical issues, and tackling operational issues.

Originality/value

Digital storytelling has had a profound impact on the way that society communicates and can be used effectively for purposes of outreach and activism, to educate using technology, or to document micro-histories. This case study provides an assessment of the current uses of digital storytelling and presents a successful implementation of a local history digital storytelling project at a public library.

Details

Library Review, vol. 62 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Kesha K. Coker, Richard L. Flight and Dominic M. Baima

Digital engagement with advertising remains challenging for marketers. This research examines “being hooked” as the mechanism of narrative transportation associated with…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital engagement with advertising remains challenging for marketers. This research examines “being hooked” as the mechanism of narrative transportation associated with digital video storytelling ads. Its purpose is to examine the efficacy of digital video ad format (storytelling vs argumentative) in hooking viewers (i.e. grabbing attention and interest in the ad). This research also presents a conceptual model of the effect of being hooked on digital engagement with advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a quasi-experimental research design with a final sample of 273 undergraduate students. It tests the hypothesis that digital video storytelling ads hook viewers more effectively than argumentative ads do. It also tests a conceptual model of the positive effect of being hooked on digital engagement with advertising.

Findings

Digital video storytelling ads hook viewers more effectively than argumentative ads do. SEM analysis shows that being hooked positively impacts intentions to view, share, promote and spread positive word of mouth. Attitude toward the ad partially mediates the relationship between being hooked and intentions to promote and spread positive word of mouth.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are applicable to target audience profiles that match the sample in this study. Despite this and other limitations, findings advance theory on the process underlying digital video storytelling advertising effects on consumer engagement.

Practical implications

Marketers are advised to invest in more digital video storytelling than argumentative ads. In doing so, marketers are more likely to hook viewers on the ad, thereby generating positive digital engagement with advertising.

Originality/value

This research focuses on attention and interest dimensions of narrative transportation as measured by “being hooked.” It also extends past models of narrative transportation by including more representative measures of digital engagement with advertising.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Massimiliano Fusari

Images had long conveyed politics through forms as varied as private paintings and public coins. If images are storytelling vectors (Fusari, 2017), visual artefacts were…

Abstract

Images had long conveyed politics through forms as varied as private paintings and public coins. If images are storytelling vectors (Fusari, 2017), visual artefacts were intended to re/shape human perception of current events and, consequently, their states of ‘being in the world’ (Heidegger, 2001); this is the reason why the visual quality of communication might be hard to disjoin from that of ‘performativity’ (Cartier-Bresson, 2018).

The polysemic (Barthes, 1977), if not fully open (Eco, 1989), quality of visual semiotics complicates identification of any framework of reference and adds to the need for practical and sensible research in digital communication (Fusari, in press).

Since the first US Presidential debate televised in 1968, a new interest surged towards the understanding and production of visual communication of politics. Increasingly so, images (both still and moving ones) have affected, if not thoroughly shaped, understanding of all recent political affairs, particularly so from the 1992's Gulf War onward (Baudrillard, 1995; Kellner, 1992).

The 2012 Invisible Children (IC)'s campaign is here assessed as the milestone marking the potential for global impact acquired by socio-political visual-centred storytelling.

The intertwining of the digital with the visual has yet to be precisely arranged for socio-political storytelling; also, storytelling as a format and approach has increasingly gained relevance, adding new concerns to issues of veracity.

In response, this chapter advances the notion of ‘storyline’ in conjunction with that of ‘storytelling’: the resulting taxonomy aims to review specific notions of truth- and trust-fulness from a visual-centred perspective.

The chapter thus explores the requirements for communicating and understanding visual storytelling on digital media; by doing so, it addresses the extent to which ‘visual storytelling’ might be a notion fit for the job of disseminating today's digital cultures.

Eventually, the chapter will question how to design visually centred communication formats and, in turn, engage these as storytelling of socio-political issues for digital platforms.

Details

Media, Technology and Education in a Post-Truth Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-907-8

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Eva Malisius

While some may perceive technology as disruptive in higher education, this chapter makes a case that video technology can be used to increase collaboration and engagement…

Abstract

While some may perceive technology as disruptive in higher education, this chapter makes a case that video technology can be used to increase collaboration and engagement in learning and teaching. It is argued that digital storytelling can be integrated as part of the assessment in graduate-level courses without compromising expectations related to academic rigor. Rather, digital storytelling advances multimedia literacy for the individual and supports the generation of bounded learning communities, specifically in online and blended programmes. Covering social presence, teaching presence and cognitive presence, the chapter draws on two examples of digital storytelling used in the MA in Conflict Analysis and Management and the MA in Global Leadership at Royal Roads University, Canada. Overall, the chapter makes a contribution to the conversation of how assessment formats can be updated to match the shift from traditional, lecture formats and brick-and-mortar institutions to applied, collaborative programmes that are often delivered in blended and online formats. Thus, as the field of higher education continues to evolve and adapt alongside technological innovations, the chapter suggests that digital storytelling can be one way to complement and update assessment formats to match the evolution of the twenty-first century.

Details

The Disruptive Power of Online Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-326-3

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

John Raven and Karen O'Donnell

Many believe that in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) the perception of a national identity, as a construct amongst Emiratis, is under threat at the moment. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Many believe that in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) the perception of a national identity, as a construct amongst Emiratis, is under threat at the moment. The purpose of this paper is to examine this concern and describe how one educational establishment in the UAE, the Sharjah Higher Colleges of Technology (SHCT), a context that presents unique language and cultural issues, used a digital storytelling competition to address this issue with Emirati students.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 150 students at SHCT used a variety of tools to create digital stories around the theme of “Proudly Emirati”, a topic aimed at building a sense of self. Stories covered topics ranging from family traditions to cultural icons. A case study investigated this initiative and addressed how the process of creating digital stories shaped the students' perspectives of self and national identity. We collected feedback on the digital storytelling initiative using focus group interviews and surveys with the students involved.

Findings

Strong support is voiced for the competition and its impact on helping students express feelings of national pride and identity.

Research limitations/implications

The survey addresses a limited number/range of issues and many more points and implications are raised in the focus group meetings that we would like to include in future research of digital storytelling.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the practical implications and huge potential of digital storytelling for learning environments.

Originality/value

This is an innovative approach to highlighting a contentious social issue with the students and community.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Andrew Davidson and Peter H. Reid

The aim of the research was to create a site which could host an archive of moving image associated with the town of Fraserburgh in Scotland, but could also include other…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research was to create a site which could host an archive of moving image associated with the town of Fraserburgh in Scotland, but could also include other digital artefacts to support and enhance the narratives contained within the films. Elements of digital storytelling were utilised, and a purposely designed section, “behind the film”, was included within the site which saw stories presented and supported with the use of archive newspaper clippings, photography and a series of reflective audio clips recorded for the research.

Design/methodology/approach

“Fraserburgh on Film” is an online platform created for the purpose of collating digital heritage film from the communities situated in the corner of North East Scotland. The research adopted an ethnographic approach working within the community, with James Taylor and other contributors to collect and curate moving images associated with the town. Archival research then supplemented these films. A digital platform was then constructed, tested and launched as the archival repository for the materials collected.

Findings

The research highlights the importance of having a close association with the community in question and provides details about the creation of the platform and framing it in the context of a vehicle for digital storytelling and participatory heritage. The article demonstrates how archive film should be gathered, edited and remastered for long-term preservation and access. Practical aspects such as video hosting, searchability, metadata are explored as are subsequent methods of dissemination and engagement.

Practical implications

The research highlights a number of practical decisions which must be made when considering similar projects. These include gaining access to the moving images in the first place but also significant infrastructural issues around the creation, organisation and dissemination of an online digital repository. These lessons are transferable to other small community-based cultural and heritage organisations.

Social implications

The archive has been very positively received in the community as an important repository for preserving community heritage and identity. High levels of public engagement have been demonstrated since its launch, which has led to new material being discovered. The archive has a wider cultural legacy across the North East of Scotland because of both the nature of the films and the widespread use of the Doric dialect.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the distinctive amount of moving image (and oral history) collected by local historian, James Taylor and his willingness to allow his materials to be edited and repurposed to ensure their long-term survival. The lessons learnt in this project are transferable to other locations in terms of both collecting material, the creation of the hosting platform and in crowdsourcing background information. The crucial importance of working with community partners in digital heritage work is reinforced. The research affords practical illustrations of steps to be taken and factors to be considered. It demonstrates how a well-crafted digital heritage product can genuinely engage with the community.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Nicholas Nicoli, Kine Henriksen, Marcos Komodromos and Dimitrios Tsagalas

This study explores how digital storytelling (DST) approaches can be used for social media campaigns to create more engaging digital content. The ability to better engage…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how digital storytelling (DST) approaches can be used for social media campaigns to create more engaging digital content. The ability to better engage with networked publics offers benefits to entities of different scale and scope, since in doing so they establish stronger relationships with their consumers and publics.

Design/methodology/approach

A digital discourse analysis combined with a five-layer coded film analysis is applied to a DST video, viewed on Facebook.

Findings

Four overarching and overlapping approaches are identified. These are emotional appeal based on clear human ideals, equality and simplicity of characters, simplicity and universal representations.

Research limitations/implications

Similar studies are required across varying targeted digital stories of different length and subject matter to distinguish effectiveness.

Practical implications

Despite advanced technological capacity for audience segmentation, social media campaigns often include unengaging content. DST offers universal characteristics that can be used by entities to engage with their consumers and publics.

Social implications

DST has been used to create learning and pedagogical environments and more participative democracies. Yet its use to strategically engage with networked publics is empirically lacking. The findings of the study can facilitate more effective digital content strategies for entities of all purposes to pursue.

Originality/value

Few studies have sought to deconstruct effective short form DST for strategic purposes. This study applies a methodological approach best suited for analysing digital content. The findings provide insights into how strategists and social media managers can create more engaging digital content.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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