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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Anna V. Bodiako, Svetlana V. Ponomareva, Tatiana M. Rogulenko, Margarita V. Melnik and Viktor V. Gorlov

The purpose of the research is to develop scientific and methodological recommendations for indicative evaluation and systemic management of the professional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research is to develop scientific and methodological recommendations for indicative evaluation and systemic management of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society and to approbate them by the example of modern Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the proprietary algorithm of the creation and implementation of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society. Based on the new algorithm, a proprietary methodology of indicative evaluation of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society is developed.

Findings

The authors offer a complex of recommendations for systemic management of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society and their approbation by the example of Russia in 2020, which allow achieving high effectiveness of this management. The results of approbation of the proprietary methodology and recommendations by the example of Russia in 2020 showed that the professional and qualification potential of the digital society is rather high and well-balanced; it is normal but has perspectives for an increase. There is an imbalance, which is caused by the domination of the development of the education market over the market of labor and entrepreneurship. Based on this, managerial measures are recommended for the development of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society in Russia.

Originality/value

The offered algorithm sets the foundation of an expanded view of the studied process, according to which the professional and qualification potential of the digital society is not only limited by the educational market but also covers the labor market and entrepreneurship. This view is revolutionary for modern Russia. The advantages of the authors’ methodology of indicative evaluation of the professional and qualification potential of the digital society include the usage of the complete set of qualitative and quantitative indicators, delimitation of indicators as to the stages of the algorithm, and the improved matrix for treatment of the results.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Petr Lupač

Abstract

Details

Beyond the Digital Divide: Contextualizing the Information Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-548-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Sophia Kaitatzi-Whitlock

In the face of the enormous rise in digital fraud and criminality, resulting in diverse afflictions to millions of user-victims, emanating from users’ horizontal…

Abstract

Purpose

In the face of the enormous rise in digital fraud and criminality, resulting in diverse afflictions to millions of user-victims, emanating from users’ horizontal interactive and transactive exchanges on the internet, but due significantly to internet’s deregulation and anonymity, this study aims to showcase the need for a socially grounded self-regulation. It holds, that this is feasible and that it can be achieved through large scale, comprehensive digital communication education (DCE) programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The composite methodology of the study comprises four types of components, namely, analytic, exploratory-discursive, constructionist and propositional. The construction-creation element consists of the design of an original combinational research tool: triangular relational pattern (TRP). Through TRPs, researchers can locate the types of relations involved between three implicated entities, namely, the affliction, the culprit and the victim and can study them in-depth. Subsequently, based on the TRP, DCE programs are composed, which are, also, proposed to be deployed by educational authorities and digital civil society associations.

Findings

The created, applied here and proposed TRPs can be used by other researchers aiming to locate, map and analyze the variants of internet criminality and victimhood and their implications across the global frontierless world and in the digital human condition, educational purposes but also to create social cohesion.

Originality/value

The study offers two original contributions. The TRP as a significant relational research tool-grid. The DCE programs that are linked to the repertories of digital relations and can be introduced in the general education programs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Ceren Karaatmaca, Fahriye Altinay, Zehra Altinay, Gokmen Dagli and Umut Akcil

The aim of the study is to evaluate the perceptions of participants on the sensitivity training in conducting online context.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to evaluate the perceptions of participants on the sensitivity training in conducting online context.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers focus on the knowledge and attitudes of digital citizens as well as their perceptions on sensitivity training taking into consideration the technological aspects. In this qualitative approach, the available data were collected from 25 students from both graduate and undergraduate levels from different fields via an open-ended questionnaire in order to get their perceptions about creating a sensitivity training in the online context. In the questionnaire, metaphors were also used.

Findings

The themes derived from these metaphors and additional themes formed by narratives about technology and sensitivity equality feeding digital citizens allow ways to be examined and emphasize the importance of sensitivity training in technology and communication areas.

Research limitations/implications

Both direct and indirect thoughts of the participants are limitations of the study.

Practical implications

Preparing students adequately for sensitivity in the workplace is a constant teaching and learning challenges in higher education.

Social implications

This study focuses on universal values in a digital society in order to shed a light on sensitivity training in preventing conflicts in the global world.

Originality/value

The study focuses on the capacity of fostering digital citizens in e-society based on universal values and sensitivity training.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

John Storm Pedersen and Adrian Wilkinson

The purpose of this paper is to: first, explain why a new model of the provision of welfare services to citizens arises from the digital society; second explore some core…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: first, explain why a new model of the provision of welfare services to citizens arises from the digital society; second explore some core elements of the competition between the new model of the provision of welfare services and the classic ideal model of the professionals’ provision of welfare services; third, suggest why it is most likely that the two models of the provision of services are combined into a symbiotic co-evolution scenario; and fourth, examine why and how this symbiotic co-evolution scenario results in new participatory spaces for the main actors associated with the provision of welfare services.

Design/methodology/approach

The review of the literature examines how the new model for the provision of welfare services facilitated by big data challenges the traditional professional model for the provision of welfare services. The authors use the Danish case to illustrate a number of themes related to this looking at the hospital sector as an example.

Findings

The proposition is that a symbiotic co-evolution scenario will emerge. A mix of the classic ideal model and practice of the service professionals’ provision of services and the digital society’s model of the provision of services is the most likely scenario in the years to come. Furthermore, Data-driven management (DDM) as an integrated key element in a symbiotic co-evolution creates (opens up) participatory environments and spaces for the main actors and agents associated with the provision of welfare services to the citizens.

Research limitations/implications

DDM’s impact on the provision of welfare services is still being realised and worked out, and more empirical research is needed before it is possible to point at the most likely scenario. However, according to the authors’ analytical framework, the institutional logics perspective, as presented in Section 2, a symbiotic co-evolution is most likely such that DDM will constitute a new logic within the provision of welfare services on the basis of which citizens as end-users could be provided with welfare services, but it is not likely that the new logic of DDM can displace the classic service professionals’ model of the provision of welfare services. Therefore, the new logic of DDM will be combined with and integrated into the existing logics within service provision, such as the Weberian bureaucracy, the Street-Level Bureaucracy, the New Public Governance and the Market. In spite of this, DDM can successfully be promoted by international management consulting firms, as a management concept which can remedy all the problems of the classic service professionals’ model of the provision of welfare services to citizens.

Practical implications

As a consequence of this, new relationships among professionals, data analytics, (middle) managers and citizens will be created regarding the provision of welfare services. Considering the new participatory environments and spaces and the new relationships among the classic service professionals, the data analytics, the (middle) managers and the citizens as end-users, the provision of welfare services may become an arena for negotiation of a new future model of the provision of welfare services to citizens.

Originality/value

The digital society has emerged from and developed further via: digitising, online information in almost real time, algorithms, data-informed decision-making processes, DDM and, ultimately, big data. The authors expect to see further digitising, more sophisticated algorithms and more big data. The authors suggest that a new model of the provision of welfare services to citizens will emerge from the development of the digital society. The authors also suggest that this new model will compete with the classic model of the provision of welfare services.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Katarina Michnik

The purpose of this paper is to study how Swedish local politicians perceive the impact of public library digital services on public libraries and to discuss how this can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how Swedish local politicians perceive the impact of public library digital services on public libraries and to discuss how this can affect the sustainable development of public libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected through semi-structured interviews with local politicians from 19 different Swedish municipalities. Data were treated to qualitative content analysis and discussed based on the concept of sustainable organization.

Findings

According to local politicians, public library digital services may affect public libraries through changes to libraries’ physical spaces, librarians’ tasks and competencies and libraries’ economic situations. Based on these findings, public library digital services can both strengthen and weaken public library sustainability through, for example, increased access and expenditures, the latter of which may threaten public library sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews did not focus specifically on the politicians’ views on public library digital services but dealt generally with their views on public libraries. To identify reasons for variations in views on this topic, follow-up interviews should be done. Data on views from public library managers would also be of use to determine the degree to which they are shared with local politicians.

Originality/value

When sustainability and public libraries are discussed, the focus is generally on the library’s contribution to a sustainable society. Here, the focus is instead on the sustainability of the public library itself.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 28 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Khahan Na-Nan, Theerawat Roopleam and Natthaya Wongsuwan

The purpose of this paper is to develop a digital intelligence quotient (DIQ) scale questionnaire that encompasses the digital identity, digital use, digital safety…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a digital intelligence quotient (DIQ) scale questionnaire that encompasses the digital identity, digital use, digital safety, digital security, digital emotional intelligence, digital communication, digital literacy and digital rights.

Design/methodology/approach

DIQ research was conducted in two phases to develop an assessment scale. First, 33 questions were developed based on previous DIQ concepts and theories. These questions were then validated using exploratory factor analysis into eight dimensions as digital identity, digital use, digital safety, digital security, digital emotional intelligence, digital communication, digital literacy and digital rights. A survey was conducted comprising 409 admins and clerks in SMEs. Second, confirmatory factor analysis and convergent validity were tested along the eight digital dimensions.

Findings

This study extended the DIQ concept to provide theoretical contribution for DIQ with intelligence study. Eight dimensions were developed to measure DIQ, including aspects of digital identity, digital use, digital safety, digital security, digital emotional intelligence, digital communication, digital literacy and digital rights.

Research limitations/implications

The DIQ questionnaire was a single-source, self-assessed data collection, as the sample included only employees of SMEs in Thailand. Results showed a good fit but require further refinement and validation using a larger sample size and various supplementary sampling contexts.

Practical implications

The eight DIQ dimensions and questionnaire results will assist organisations and supervisors to focus on employees’ DIQ using both work and lifestyle parameters. This knowledge will help supervisors to encourage employees to increase their DIQ for more effective usage of digital literacy. Researchers and academics will be able to apply this instrument in future studies.

Originality/value

The DIQ questionnaire is a new instrument which comprehensively explores relevant dimensions to increase employee understanding of digital identity, digital use, digital safety, digital security, digital emotional intelligence, digital communication, digital literacy and digital rights.

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Manas Paul, Parijat Upadhyay and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

This paper posits a critical analysis of digitalisation initiatives of emerging economies with a focus on India. It suggests granular policy measures towards realising the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper posits a critical analysis of digitalisation initiatives of emerging economies with a focus on India. It suggests granular policy measures towards realising the dream of a competitive, empowered and knowledge-based society. To this extent, the paper juxtaposes and compares policy measures undertaken by several governments to facilitate digitalisation in their country. The policy measures embarked upon have been critically analysed in terms of their relevance, challenges for their implementation and adoption at the back of the prevailing social and economic fabric of the country. At the same time, attempts have been made to benchmark it against the best practice standards weighed in by the industry studies. The paper has also laid down a robust agenda for future research that can be replicated for any country.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint study based upon public data and documentary sources within India as well as publications of several countries and international agencies. Research projects of numerous multinational companies working in the area of digitalisation has been accessed and analysed as well in the study.

Findings

The findings of this study have policy implications for governments in several emerging economies who have embarked on the path of digitising their economy with the larger objectives of reaping its larger benefits but have to deal with the challenges of inadequate resources to create an effective ecosystem to facilitate such a transition.

Originality/value

The study highlights the implications of challenges of gaps of physical and socioeconomic infrastructure in driving digitalisation, highlighting granular policy measures for public managers and policy makers to address them.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Sue Myburgh and Anna Maria Tammaro

Purpose – Changes in the environment – political, economic, social, educational and technological – have demanded changes in many areas of work, most particularly in the…

Abstract

Purpose – Changes in the environment – political, economic, social, educational and technological – have demanded changes in many areas of work, most particularly in the roles and tasks of those involved in the preservation and transmission of cultural heritage, and interpersonal information intervention. Sending, storing and receiving digital information are commonplace activities, and now formally constructed digital libraries constitute an important component of this virtual information environment. Similar to traditional physical libraries, digital libraries are constructed for particular purposes, to serve particular clienteles or to collect and provide access to selected information resources (whether text documents or artefacts). Information intermediaries – or digital librarians – in this transformed information environment must learn new skills, play different roles and possess a new suite of competencies.

Design, methodology and approach – Myburgh and Tammaro have, for several years, examined the new knowledge, skills and competencies that are now demanded, in order to design and test a curriculum for digital librarians which has found expression in the Erasmus Mundus Master's in Digital Library Learning (DILL), now in its sixth year.

Findings – The chief objective of the Digital library program is to prepare information intermediaries for effective contribution to their particular communities and societies, in order to assist present and future generations of digital natives to negotiate the digital information environment effectively. This includes, for example, the necessity for digital librarians to be able to teach cultural competency, critical information literacies and knowledge value mapping, as well as understanding the new standards and formats that are still being developed in order to capture, store, describe, locate and preserve digital materials.

Research limitations – In this chapter, we propose describing the work we have done thus far, with special reference to the development of a model of the role of the digital librarian, including competencies, skills, knowledge base and praxis.

Social implications – Amongst the various issues that have arisen and demanded consideration and investigation are the importance of a multidisciplinarity dimension in the education of digital librarians, as information work is orthogonal to other disciplinary and cultural categorisations; that a gradual convergence or confluence is being identified between various cultural institutions which include libraries, archives and museums; the new modes of learning and teaching, with particular regard to knowledge translation and the learner-generated environment or context; and possibly even a reconsideration of the role of the information professional and new service models for their praxis.

Originality/value – The chapter tries to evidence the present debate about digital librarianship in Europe.

Details

Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-714-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Jen Schradie

Despite the pendulum swing from utopian to dystopian views of the Internet, the direction of the popular and academic literature continues to lean toward its liberatory…

Abstract

Despite the pendulum swing from utopian to dystopian views of the Internet, the direction of the popular and academic literature continues to lean toward its liberatory potential, particularly as a tool for redressing social inequality. At the same time, decades of digital inequality scholarship have shown persistent socioeconomic inequality in Internet access and use. Yet most of this research captures class by individualized income and education variables, rather than a power relational framework. By tracing research on how fear, control, and risk manifest itself with inequalities related to digital content, digital activism, and digital work, I argue that a narrow stratification approach may miss the full cause and effect of digital inequality. Instead, a class analysis based on power relations may contribute to a broader and more precise theoretical lens to understand the digital divide. As a result, technology can reinforce, or even exacerbate, existing patterns of social and economic inequality because of this power differential.

Details

Rethinking Class and Social Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-020-5

Keywords

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