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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Te Wu

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, project management was undergoing gradual shift and moving from traditional ways of working toward embracing digitization. The COVID-19…

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640

Abstract

Purpose

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, project management was undergoing gradual shift and moving from traditional ways of working toward embracing digitization. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated this transformation. This paper highlights the importance of digital project management (DPM), its adoption of digital technologies, the changing role of digital project manager, significant and abrupt swing in the rise of virtual teams and the benefits and challenges of remote project teams. This paper aims to discuss the latest development in project management and to lay out the rationale why DPM is here to stay even after the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has based this research on reviewing publications from the project management journals and publications, interviews of project management professionals and analyzing data from a project management consultancy.

Findings

The pandemic accelerated the digitalization of project management including the adoption of digital tools and technologies, embracing an agile approach to implementing projects; working collaborative in remote teams; and breaking traditional barriers of geography, time zones and fundamentally how project teams collaborate.

Practical implications

Project management is being digitized, changing how teams work. Fueled by the pandemic, DPM accelerated its momentum. The rate of adoption is likely to be strong after the pandemic. Organizations and individuals should consider embracing DPM but with the full knowledge of both benefits and challenges.

Originality/value

DPM is still in its early days even though the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated its use. Today and likely after the pandemic, organizations and people are increasingly embracing digital technologies, remote teams and agile project management approaches to project management. It is likely that in the foreseeable future, nearly all project managers will be digital project managers, giving rise to the importance of understanding the challenges and benefits and building the digital skills for both individuals and organizations.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Kate Dohe and Robin Pike

Project management techniques for digital initiatives must shift with the transformation of content from analog to digital, from singular projects to mass-digitization and…

Abstract

Purpose

Project management techniques for digital initiatives must shift with the transformation of content from analog to digital, from singular projects to mass-digitization and large-scale digital preservation. How are project management methods employed across digital practices, from digitization, to online access, to preservation? How can project management methods evolve to create a collaborative workflow across collection and service areas of librarianship, centered on digital stewardship?

Methodology/approach

Solutions for these questions are illustrated in an explanation of the workflows implemented at the University of Maryland, College Park Libraries and reflected upon in a case study of a recent digital initiative.

Findings

Centered on the efforts of two departments in the Libraries’ Digital Systems and Stewardship division, this chapter outlines the origins, techniques, and integration of digital project management with a focus on Waterfall and Agile project management. Furthermore, the integration and transition of project management methodologies and tools between groups is emphasized, mirroring the transformation of analog media to digital formats and the requisite shifts in thinking such projects require.

Originality/value

These case studies are based on research across the profession and implementation at the University of Maryland, College Park Libraries. The local application of two established project management techniques, Waterfall and Agile, are summarized and compared. Though regularly employed in application development, applying Agile project management in libraries is a relatively new practice and has not been widely documented in library literature.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

A. Miller

The purpose of this paper is to offer and explore innovative strategies for building and sustaining digital initiatives at information organizations. Although the examples…

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1883

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer and explore innovative strategies for building and sustaining digital initiatives at information organizations. Although the examples provided are based on case studies at an academic library, the practices are rooted in project management principles and therefore applicable to all library types, museums, archives and other information organizations. The innovative strategies on staffing and funding will be particularly useful to organizations faced with monetary and staffing shortages and highlights collaborative management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Concept of strategic and collaborative management practices led by an experienced project manager cross-trained in management, technical and soft skills enables the successful development and sustainability of digital initiatives. A cross-trained librarian’s management practices of leading the Digital Scholarship Initiatives at a particular university will be examined as a case study and aided with literature supporting the need for digital initiatives leaders to have training beyond the credentials of librarian, curator, archivist or historian in the technologically savvy twenty-first century ecology of information centers.

Findings

The innovative strategies implemented in the case study yielded increases in the number of hours of digital lab usage, digital projects developed, seminars or workshops presented, attendance of library hosted events, number of programs implemented and awareness on campus, all with limited staff and funding. The variety and level of production and marketing is instrumental to the growth and sustainability of digital initiatives.

Practical implications

The innovative strategies emphasized in this paper use the concept of borrowed or shared time to start staffing needs and is particularly helpful to organizations that do not have a strong line of dedicated staffing or funding to begin building digital initiatives. Offers small ways to start immediately while setting the stage to plan for big ideas for the future.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a credentialed information expert, such as a librarian, archivist or curator, that is, also cross-trained in project management and technology is the key to not only successfully leading digital initiatives but is instrumental for its sustainability and the marketing, growth and future of digital initiatives.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Angela Fritz

This chapter discusses how digital project management has fundamentally changed the nature of collection service models in university archives and special collections.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses how digital project management has fundamentally changed the nature of collection service models in university archives and special collections.

Methodology/approach

Through a conceptual overview of case studies, this chapter examines the establishment of “digital content hubs,” with a special focus on the ways in which a variety of library units share the work of surfacing distinctive collections through cross-functional team-building.

Findings

To successfully build “digital content hubs,” academic libraries have embraced a new alignment to incorporate special collections and archives staff, services, and collections more holistically into larger library collecting initiatives and organizational structures. This chapter posits that, through the stewardship of digital projects, archivists and librarians have had to sharpen and expand requisite managerial and technical skills to support “distinctive collection teams” who work cross-functionality with outward-facing approaches to integrated collection building. In addition to embracing assessment tools and diversified funding strategies, archives and special collections have also adopted new collaboration models reliant on centralized but flexible project management structures that emphasize cross-training, complementary subject and technological specializations, and a team-based focus in order to ensure interoperability, sustainability, and broad accessibility of digital collections.

Originality/value

This chapter offers readers a new way of conceptualizing “distinctive collection teams,” proposes some strategies for marshaling resources from across library units, and suggests ways in which librarians and archivists can collaborate on content selection, copyright clearance, metadata creation, and web design and information technology development.

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Li Sun

This paper seeks to discuss the roles and responsibilities of a metadata manager in collaborative digital projects.

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1590

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the roles and responsibilities of a metadata manager in collaborative digital projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the general requirements for metadata management, and introduces some scenarios in the practices of digital projects by the Rutgers University Libraries to support the generalized definition. A workflow of metadata management is illustrated.

Practical implications

With an explicit definition of the roles and responsibilities of the metadata manager, many other digital libraries that need to develop a new or optimize the existing workflow may find the Rutgers experience useful as a reference.

Originality/value

Very few papers have explored this topic, although the functions of metadata in the development of digital projects have been talked about extensively.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Case study
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Mohamad Abu Ghazaleh and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

Information technology, management science and strategic management.

Abstract

Subject area

Information technology, management science and strategic management.

Study level/applicability

The case has been developed for use in “e-government Management and Leadership” and “Strategic IT management” courses and is appropriate for MBA and Executive Development Programs, as well as corporate training programs incorporating information system and e-government dilemmas. The case is appropriate for courses that deal with e-government development.

Case overview

Ajman Digital Government (ADG) was established in 2017. It is a new government entity intended to deliver the Ajman e-Government Project to increase government efficiency and productivity, as well as transforming public services to meet citizen expectations of digital experiences and satisfying the UAE Federal e-government standard. The current UAE federal e-government ranking includes only two emirates, Abu Dhabi and Dubai. ADG intends to be part of the UAE federal e-government ranking and participating in the world digital competitiveness ranking. Many challenges lie ahead for ADG, which intends to add Ajman’s e-government to UAE’s federal e-government, supporting the digital competitiveness of UAE worldwide and participating in increasing the ranking for UAE federal government in IMD’s World Digital Competitiveness Ranking; in addition to this challenging goal, there are significant new obstacles to the implementation of the new digital government in Ajman. ADG requires specific ingredients for the maintenance and support of the UAE e-government standard to position the project toward the success. Study of the strategic positioning of ADG would help support success of the development of e-government and weigh which technology should be used and how the project should proceed strategically. The case also provides a very useful ground for discussing all challenges faced and how the innovative business model of e-government will address these issues and create a sustainable e-government environment.

Expected learning outcomes

The case is structured to achieve the following learning objectives: Students can recognise the dilemma faced by the Ajman Government in managing citizen expectations, stakeholder expectations and the wider implications of its actions on developing a coherent communication strategy. Students can recognise and critically evaluate the role of leadership and communication in using e-government strategies in hyper technology market. To bring out the challenges in the digital government and repositioning strategies in a highly competitive and dynamic technology environment. Differentiation and repositioning strategies in a highly competitive technology market. Learn how to effectively communicate the value of a digital government to the targeted citizens. Understand how to strike a balance between short-term objectives and long-term goals in e-government development. Analyse the environment, competition, industry and IT product positioning. List alternative IT strategies and e-government positioning. Understand the primary drivers of interaction in e-government.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 7: Management Science.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Abstract

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

H. Frank Cervone

The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the model for standardized project management developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), as applied to…

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6081

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the model for standardized project management developed by the Project Management Institute (PMI), as applied to digital library projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the PMI model for project management, the paper develops a context for managing digital library projects according to the PMI's standard methodology.

Findings

The paper finds that by using a standard methodology increases the likelihood of delivering projects on time and on budget.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to digital library project managers as it fills a gap in the literature by providing an accessible overview of the major components of standard project management methodology as defined by the PMI.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Stine Hendler

The paper explores coordination practices in digital–physical product development and their consequences for companies traditionally relying on physical product development.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper explores coordination practices in digital–physical product development and their consequences for companies traditionally relying on physical product development.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an embedded case study design, the paper reports four action research initiatives addressing the digital–physical coordination challenges encountered by a leading B2C company.

Findings

Effective coordination of digital–physical product development, firstly, involves standardization of process, output and skills to accommodate the stability needed for efficient physical product development and manufacturing. Secondly, it involves agile coordination events, such as Scrum ceremonies and PI planning, to facilitate the mutual adjustment needed to allow agility and the differences between digital and physical product development to be continuously and successfully negotiated.

Research limitations/implications

The paper illustrates a research model with case evidence and suggests tentative theory in the form of propositions. Future research should explore coordination problems and solutions in different digital–physical project types and contexts.

Practical implications

Coordination practices for digital–physical product development are presented and analyzed, providing inspiration for companies.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to explore coordination practices within the emerging field of digital–physical product development.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Ellen Belcher and Ellen Sexton

The purpose of this paper is to present the process, challenges and lessons learned from carrying out a small digital project to create a web resource of unique historic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the process, challenges and lessons learned from carrying out a small digital project to create a web resource of unique historic materials related to crime in New York City. All aspects of digital project management are discussed, including selection, infrastructure, budgeting, workflow and delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences from project administration, including management of a combination in‐house and outsourced digitization and metadata are discussed. Formation and management of the resulting web resource is explained, which is the product of a creative amalgamation of commercial and open source software. Challenges encountered are presented with suggestions for practical solutions and considerations for future projects.

Findings

This grant‐funded pilot project presented foreseen and unforeseen problems. Lessons learned and solutions suggesting best approaches for a small‐scale digitization project are presented here.

Practical implications

In this paper best practices and suggestions for managing a small digital project are presented, including financial, staffing and technical considerations.

Originality/value

Unlike many other discussions that focus on management of large institutional projects, this study presents an incremental approach for small‐scale digitization projects. Presented here are practical uses of available applications for establishing project infrastructure to sustain and continue growth of digital content for small institutions.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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