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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Georgina Robinson

This paper aims to evidence the perspectives of information professionals in the UK in relation to environmental sustainability and climate action to catalyse collaborative action.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evidence the perspectives of information professionals in the UK in relation to environmental sustainability and climate action to catalyse collaborative action.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes an interpretivist stance. Research into archive and record management literature was conducted to establish key themes on climate change within the information sector. These themes informed research questions included in a survey cascaded to UK archivists, conservators, records managers and cultural heritage professionals via national mailing lists. The results were then codified and analysed. The study had research ethics and data protection approval from University College London.

Findings

Using professional ethics as a framework, this paper argues that climate action can protect records from the impact of climate change, ensuring future access. The information professionals surveyed were motivated by duties to preservation and access to mitigate the impact of the information sector on the environment. However, sector-specific climate action, such as introducing passive storage conditions or decreasing collection sizes, is limited by insufficient resources, organisational hierarchies and cultures, sector support and a perceived conflict with the duty to preservation.

Originality/value

To date, there is a growing body of literature from other countries on archival practices and the natural environment. However, the UK in general and the records management sector in particular, have not yet fully engaged in the discussion. This study reviews these knowledge gaps for the UK information sector to appropriately respond to climate change.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2018

Kristin R. Eschenfelder, Kalpana Shankar, Rachel D. Williams, Dorothea Salo, Mei Zhang and Allison Langham

The purpose of this paper is to report on how library and information science (LIS) as a field operationalizes the concept of organizational sustainability for managing…

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3016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on how library and information science (LIS) as a field operationalizes the concept of organizational sustainability for managing digital resources, projects and infrastructures such as digital libraries and repositories over time. It introduces a nine dimensional framework for organizational sustainability in the digital cultural heritage community.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of publications from three LIS databases (2000–2015).

Findings

Comparing the articles to the nine dimension framework shows that most LIS articles discuss technology, financial or management dimensions. Fewer articles describe disaster planning, assessment or policy dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Three LIS databases might not include all relevant journals, conferences, white papers and other materials. The data set also did not include books; library management textbooks might include useful material on organizational sustainability. Claims about the prevalence of themes are subject to methodological limits of content analysis.

Practical implications

Organizations that steward digital collections need to be clear about what they mean when they are referring to organizational sustainability so that they can make appropriate decisions for future-proofing their collections. The analysis would also suggest for a greater need to consider the full range of dimensions of organizational sustainability.

Originality/value

By introducing a new nine dimensional framework of organizational sustainability the authors hope to promote more and better conversations within the LIS community about organizational sustainability. The authors hope these conversations will lead to productive action and improvements in the arrangements of people and work necessary to keep digital projects and services going over time, given ongoing challenges.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Gobinda Chowdhury

This paper aims to propose a model which serves to illustrate that a number of factors are responsible for, and contribute to, the different forms of sustainability of…

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5363

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model which serves to illustrate that a number of factors are responsible for, and contribute to, the different forms of sustainability of digital information services. It also seeks to identify some areas of information research and their interrelationship in the context of sustainability of digital information services.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on critical analysis of a range of research and policy documents, and an environment scan, in different aspects of sustainability of information systems and services. Recent and relevant past research studies as well as some relevant government policies and initiatives have been critically analyzed in order to identify various factors that are said to contribute to the economic, social and environmental sustainability of information services.

Findings

It is noted that the sustainability of information has not been studied within the mainstream information science research. However, several previous research studies have produced findings and models that can be used to achieve some aspects of sustainability of information. It is also noted that various parameters of sustainability are inter-related and hence a proper research agenda has to be prepared, and concerted research efforts are needed in order to be able to develop and manage sustainable digital information services.

Practical implications

A model has been proposed showing the various factors to be studied for achieving the economic, social and environmental sustainability of information services. Interrelations among the different factors and their implications for sustainability of digital information systems services are also discussed.

Originality/value

The model is expected to open new vistas for research in the economic, social and environmental sustainability of digital information systems and services. It will develop new tools, technologies and applications for building sustainable information systems and services appropriate for the digital era.

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Sheila Morrissey

Free and open source software (FOSS) brings many benefits to digital preservation; however it is not “free”. If the context in which free and open source software tools…

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1815

Abstract

Purpose

Free and open source software (FOSS) brings many benefits to digital preservation; however it is not “free”. If the context in which free and open source software tools are created and employed is examined, it becomes clear that: the sustainability of any software (FOSS, custom or commercial) to ensure the preservation of the digital heritage will depend on careful assessment of, and provision for, the costs (implicit and explicit) entailed in the production and continued employment of these tools. The purpose of this paper is to focus on FOSS and archiving of the digital heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

Portico, a not‐for‐profit digital preservation service, explores the costs of FOSS based on its experiences as a working archive with an extremely long time horizon.

Findings

There are considerable benefits to FOSS, including its openness and the broad‐based testing of it in real‐world situations. FOSS tools can provide considerable cost savings over proprietary tools. However, FOSS is neither free to use, nor to create, nor to maintain. Digital preservation organizations must inventory not only the FOSS tools in the preservation arsenal, but the network of sustaining tools (FOSS and otherwise), documentation, and “tribal knowledge” that make these tools effectively usable. The risks to sustainability of this network of resources must be assessed, and determine what it will cost to keep them viable. Strategies will have to be considered and implemented for providing the means to sustain these resources. An engaged community of use is the best guarantor of the vitality of any FOSS tool. As that community wanes, it becomes even more essential to capture the significant properties and domain knowledge about that tool. Creators of new software in the digital preservation space have a particular obligation to provide and maintain information about the significant properties of that software.

Originality/value

The paper shows how Portico brings its practical experiences integrating multiple FOSS tools to bear on an analysis of the costs to creating and maintaining these tools over the long‐term.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Richard Wright

Digitisation is used for preservation of audiovisual material. This preservation work is a major producer of digital collections – which then need digital preservation for…

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4296

Abstract

Digitisation is used for preservation of audiovisual material. This preservation work is a major producer of digital collections – which then need digital preservation for sustainability. EC Project Presto surveyed the holdings and status of ten major broadcast archives – a significant portion of total European broadcast archives, including some of the largest individual collections. The main findings are that approximately 75 per cent of this material is at risk or inaccessible and that the collections are growing at roughly four times the rate of current progress in preservation work. This paper gives further results of the project, and gives practical guidance for preservation of audiovisual material. Presto demonstrated the effectiveness of the “preservation factory” concept for major broadcast archives – a way to reduce cost while still maintaining or even increasing quality. There is now a new EC project, Presto‐space, which will make the preservation factory available to small and medium‐sized collections.

Details

VINE, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Steve Knight

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the digital preservation programme at the National Library of New Zealand.

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4748

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the digital preservation programme at the National Library of New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a description of the legislative and strategic context for digital preservation in New Zealand, details are provided of the system for the National Digital Heritage Archive (NDHA), developed with help from Ex Libris, and marketed as Rosetta. A small survey of staff attitudes to the NDHA was also carried out.

Findings

Key factors to be considered by others developing a digital preservation programme include: definition of strategic drivers; choice of a suitable business model; defining the exact purpose of the digital preservation programme; deployment and implementation; staffing aspects; and how to get started.

Originality/value

The National Library of New Zealand has been a leading organisation in digital preservation and its experiences will be of relevance to many other libraries throughout the world.

Details

Program, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Jennifer Edmond and Francesca Morselli

This paper proposes a new perspective on the enormous and unresolved challenge to existing practices of publication and documentation posed by the outputs of digital

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a new perspective on the enormous and unresolved challenge to existing practices of publication and documentation posed by the outputs of digital research projects in the humanities, where much good work is being lost due to resource or technical challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper documents and analyses both the existing literature on promoting sustainability for the outputs of digital humanities projects and the innovative approach of a single large-scale project.

Findings

The findings of the research presented show that sustainability planning for large-scale research projects needs to consider data and technology but also community, communications and process knowledge simultaneously. In addition, it should focus not only on a project as a collection of tangible and intangible assets, but also on the potential user base for these assets and what these users consider valuable about them.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions of the paper have been formulated in the context of one specific project. As such, it may amplify the specificities of this project in its results.

Practical implications

An approach to project sustainability following the recommendations outlined in this paper would include a number of uncommon features, such as a longer development horizon, wider perspective on project results, and an audit of tacit and explicit knowledge.

Social Implications

These results can ultimately preserve public investment in projects.

Originality/value

This paper supplements more reductive models for project sustainability with a more holistic approach that others may learn from in mapping and sustaining user value for their projects for the medium to long terms.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Angela Fritz

This chapter discusses how digital project management has fundamentally changed the nature of collection service models in university archives and special collections.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses how digital project management has fundamentally changed the nature of collection service models in university archives and special collections.

Methodology/approach

Through a conceptual overview of case studies, this chapter examines the establishment of “digital content hubs,” with a special focus on the ways in which a variety of library units share the work of surfacing distinctive collections through cross-functional team-building.

Findings

To successfully build “digital content hubs,” academic libraries have embraced a new alignment to incorporate special collections and archives staff, services, and collections more holistically into larger library collecting initiatives and organizational structures. This chapter posits that, through the stewardship of digital projects, archivists and librarians have had to sharpen and expand requisite managerial and technical skills to support “distinctive collection teams” who work cross-functionality with outward-facing approaches to integrated collection building. In addition to embracing assessment tools and diversified funding strategies, archives and special collections have also adopted new collaboration models reliant on centralized but flexible project management structures that emphasize cross-training, complementary subject and technological specializations, and a team-based focus in order to ensure interoperability, sustainability, and broad accessibility of digital collections.

Originality/value

This chapter offers readers a new way of conceptualizing “distinctive collection teams,” proposes some strategies for marshaling resources from across library units, and suggests ways in which librarians and archivists can collaborate on content selection, copyright clearance, metadata creation, and web design and information technology development.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Priscilla Caplan

This paper aims to select a few terms in common use today in the library and information science domain, and looks into their usage over time.

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2083

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to select a few terms in common use today in the library and information science domain, and looks into their usage over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of terms is traced historically, if somewhat informally, through writings such as websites, press releases and articles.

Findings

“Discovery tool” suddenly acquired a specific meaning in 2009. “Digital preservation” and “digital curation” may never sort themselves out. “OPAC” and “ILS” are terms in disfavor as the products they refer to lose luster.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is to make readers more aware of the way they use words by reflecting on some commonly used terms in the library and information science domain.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

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473

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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