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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Christofer Laurell

The aim of this paper is to conceptually explore how spatial features of social media can be explained.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to conceptually explore how spatial features of social media can be explained.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a conceptual approach, specific spatial features of social media are reviewed in terms of location, locale and sense of place within the wider frame of the social media landscape.

Findings

In the literature stream of social media management and marketing, central conceptualisations relate implicitly to the notions of space and place. By drawing from the field of human geography, this implicit spatiality of social media is made explicit by approaching social media applications as the building blocks of digital space in which digital places are created, maintained and integrated with each other over time as a result of interactions and relationships forming between users that inhabit digital places.

Originality/value

The present paper contributes to extant literature by providing a spatial approach to social media that depicts the character of social media, its interrelation with the physical world, as well as how it currently transforms and evolves. Furthermore, it also addresses how social media places represent settings in which social meaning of commercial relevance is created that affects the way consumption activities take place beyond the physical realm of human co-existence.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Jeffrey Pomerantz and Gary Marchionini

The purpose of this paper is to present a high‐level investigation of the physical‐conceptual continuum occupied by both digital and physical libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a high‐level investigation of the physical‐conceptual continuum occupied by both digital and physical libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework is provided for thinking about the notions of place and library. The issue of materials and the ideas they represent is considered. Places for people are considered, including issues of people's sense of place in physical and digital spaces. The issue of physical and digital spaces as places for work, collaboration, and community‐building is considered.

Findings

As more digital libraries are built, and as more physical libraries offer electronic access to parts of their collection, two trends are likely to result: the role of the library as a storage space for materials will become decreasingly important; and the role of the library as a space for users, for individual and collaborative work, and as a space for social activity, will become increasingly important.

Research limitations/implications

Digital libraries are unable to fulfill some of the functions of the physical library as physical spaces, but are able to offer functions beyond what the physical library can offer as cognitive spaces.

Practical implications

Areas of likely future development for digital libraries are suggested, as vehicles for enhancing cognitive space by augmenting representations of ideas in materials.

Originality/value

This paper argues that in many ways digital libraries really are places in the conceptual sense, and will continue to broaden and enrich the roles that libraries play in people's lives and in the larger social milieu.

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Marilyn Von Seggern, Alex Merrill and Lihong Zhu

Internet sites about geographical locations attempt to articulate and convey “sense of place”, a concept that relates to the unique identity and meaning attached to place

Abstract

Purpose

Internet sites about geographical locations attempt to articulate and convey “sense of place”, a concept that relates to the unique identity and meaning attached to place. This paper aims to review the variety of resource types, metadata sources, and navigation features that are used by “sense of place” web sites to communicate with and involve the user. Assessment of place‐based digital collection sites is discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Current place‐based sites were reviewed to show the diversity and range of content as well as metadata options, applications for users, and web features that make the most of location‐specific foci.

Findings

Place‐based sites present many types of resources and use geospatial, interactive, customization, and other tools to enhance the content, assist the user in finding resources, and develop “sense of place”. Assessment of such digital collections is being done but could be used more extensively to improve the sites.

Practical implications

Identifying and discussing place‐based digital collections will serve to highlight a specialized type of site and collection. Attention to the enhancement of “sense of place” internet sites could further geographical and geospatial interests, education, and web applications.

Social implications

“Sense of place” sites provide information about places that have unique history, environmental sensitivity, or special meaning. Digital content is readily available for educational purposes and can be a contribution point for shared history and experience.

Originality/value

This paper will be of value to those interested in digital collections primarily focused on a geographical location and how web applications can build on the content to convey “sense of place” to users of the site.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Details

Digital Theology: A Computer Science Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-535-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

M Alaa Mandour

Within the last decade the media's full potential has been its use as a tool for conception and production of new architecture. What is this new architecture? Is it is…

Abstract

Within the last decade the media's full potential has been its use as a tool for conception and production of new architecture. What is this new architecture? Is it is really new or it is just a term to describe a transitory fashion development similar to the short lived post-modern flirtations of the 80th? A quick view at some of the buildings being constructed today does certainly suggest that there is a totally different approach to the production and the resultant form of architecture.

Traditional methods of architecture conception are being replaced by digital media; a revolt, that many argue, has far-reaching inference in how the architectural entity is presented, recognized and practiced. More prominently, it proposes new formal possibilities absurd a decade ago. Architects working within this digital realm utilize CAD/Cam systems, CNC milling systems and software programs such as Maya, Form Z, and CATIA. Terms such as beauty, scale and proportion, used to describe the formal character of the pre-digital vernacular are being replaced by adjectives such as smooth, supple, and morphed, derived from the digital practice. The built result of such experiments are obvious the world over, whether it is Gehry's Philadelphia Music Hall, or Itto's new opera in Thailand, among others. The work of these architects was, a decade ago, confined to the virtual space of the computer, only seen in architectural magazines, viewed as a radical approach to architecture. However, the digital revolution has allowed for this vision to be transformed into reality. The use of digital tools both as a presentation tool and form generating device is unquestioned, a given, and will in the future consider any other traditional systems.

Spaces have gone from being a physical to virtual of a gigantic digital network of networks, which shapes our collective future. The way and pace at which we connect, communicate, memorize, imagine and control the flows of valuable information have changed forever. The paper also will introduce a new concept of virtual urban spaces and interaction between it and the physical urban environments.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Andrew Davidson and Peter H. Reid

The aim of the research was to create a site which could host an archive of moving image associated with the town of Fraserburgh in Scotland, but could also include other…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research was to create a site which could host an archive of moving image associated with the town of Fraserburgh in Scotland, but could also include other digital artefacts to support and enhance the narratives contained within the films. Elements of digital storytelling were utilised, and a purposely designed section, “behind the film”, was included within the site which saw stories presented and supported with the use of archive newspaper clippings, photography and a series of reflective audio clips recorded for the research.

Design/methodology/approach

“Fraserburgh on Film” is an online platform created for the purpose of collating digital heritage film from the communities situated in the corner of North East Scotland. The research adopted an ethnographic approach working within the community, with James Taylor and other contributors to collect and curate moving images associated with the town. Archival research then supplemented these films. A digital platform was then constructed, tested and launched as the archival repository for the materials collected.

Findings

The research highlights the importance of having a close association with the community in question and provides details about the creation of the platform and framing it in the context of a vehicle for digital storytelling and participatory heritage. The article demonstrates how archive film should be gathered, edited and remastered for long-term preservation and access. Practical aspects such as video hosting, searchability, metadata are explored as are subsequent methods of dissemination and engagement.

Practical implications

The research highlights a number of practical decisions which must be made when considering similar projects. These include gaining access to the moving images in the first place but also significant infrastructural issues around the creation, organisation and dissemination of an online digital repository. These lessons are transferable to other small community-based cultural and heritage organisations.

Social implications

The archive has been very positively received in the community as an important repository for preserving community heritage and identity. High levels of public engagement have been demonstrated since its launch, which has led to new material being discovered. The archive has a wider cultural legacy across the North East of Scotland because of both the nature of the films and the widespread use of the Doric dialect.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the distinctive amount of moving image (and oral history) collected by local historian, James Taylor and his willingness to allow his materials to be edited and repurposed to ensure their long-term survival. The lessons learnt in this project are transferable to other locations in terms of both collecting material, the creation of the hosting platform and in crowdsourcing background information. The crucial importance of working with community partners in digital heritage work is reinforced. The research affords practical illustrations of steps to be taken and factors to be considered. It demonstrates how a well-crafted digital heritage product can genuinely engage with the community.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Abstract

Details

Intergenerational Locative Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-139-1

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Johan Hagberg, Malin Sundstrom and Niklas Egels-Zandén

Digitalization denotes an on-going transformation of great importance for the retail sector. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of the digitalization…

Abstract

Purpose

Digitalization denotes an on-going transformation of great importance for the retail sector. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the phenomenon of the digitalization of retailing by developing a conceptual framework that can be used to further delineate current transformations of the retailer-consumer interface.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a framework for digitalization in the retail-consumer interface that consists of four elements: exchanges, actors, offerings, and settings. Drawing on the previous literature, it describes and exemplifies how digitalization transforms each of these elements and identifies implications and proposals for future research.

Findings

Digitalization transforms the following: retailing exchanges (in a number of ways and in various facets of exchange, including communications, transactions, and distribution); the nature of retail offerings (blurred distinctions between products and services, what constitutes the actual offering and how it is priced); retail settings (i.e. where and when retailing takes place); and the actors who participate in retailing (i.e. retailers and consumers, among other parties).

Research limitations/implications

The framework developed can be used to further delineate current transformations of retailing due to digitalization. The current transformation has created challenges for research, as it demands sensitivity to development over time and insists that categories that have been taken for granted are becoming increasingly blurred due to greater hybridity.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a significant and on-going transformation in retailing and develops a framework that can both guide future research and aid retail practitioners in analysing retailing’s current transformation due to digitalization.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Shannon Lucky and Craig Harkema

To describe how academic libraries can support digital humanities (DH) research by leveraging established library values and strengths to provide support for preservation…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe how academic libraries can support digital humanities (DH) research by leveraging established library values and strengths to provide support for preservation and access and physical and digital spaces for researchers and communities, specifically focused on cultural heritage collections.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiences of the authors in collaborating with DH scholars and community organizations is discussed with references to the literature. The paper suggests how research libraries can use existing expertise and infrastructure to support the development of digital cultural heritage collections and DH research.

Findings

Developing working collaborations with DH researchers and community organizations is a productive way to engage in impactful cultural heritage digital projects. It can aid resource allocation decisions to support active research, strategic goals, community needs and the development and preservation of unique, locally relevant collections. Libraries do not need to radically transform themselves to do this work, they have established strengths that can be effective in meeting the challenges of DH research.

Practical implications

Academic libraries should strategically direct the work they already excel at to support DH research and work with scholars and communities to build collections and infrastructure to support these initiatives.

Originality/value

The paper recommends practical approaches, supported by literature and local examples, that could be taken when building DH and community-engaged cultural heritage projects.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Amber L. Cushing

The topic of personal archives has mainly been discussed by two research traditions in information science: archives and records management, and personal information…

Abstract

Purpose

The topic of personal archives has mainly been discussed by two research traditions in information science: archives and records management, and personal information management. The purpose of this paper is to compare a corpus of the archival literature written by the archival community with the concepts and challenges posed by Catherine Marshall, who exemplifies the personal information management approach. Many of the personal digital archiving challenges that Marshall identifies are related to discussions within the archival community.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to demonstrate the similarities between Marshall's work with the archival discussion about personal archiving, Marshall's challenges, tasks and attributes of personal digital archiving were compared with a total of 33 articles from two library and information science databases.

Findings

Many of the personal digital archiving challenges that Marshall identifies are related to discussions in the archival community. The author suggests that certain aspects of the archival literature may be utilized to address Marshall's identified challenges. Lastly, future collaborations between members of the archival community and members of the personal information management community may prove useful in addressing the challenges of personal digital archiving

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that two areas of information science share ideas about how to address the issues related to personal archives, but rarely consult one another when writing about personal digital archiving. The author highlights the archives and records management tradition in an attempt to introduce the literature to the broader discussion on personal digital archives being had by the personal information management tradition.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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