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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Shanna Smith Jaggars, Amanda L. Folk and David Mullins

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a survey instrument to measure three components of students’ perceptions of open and affordable course materials – quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a survey instrument to measure three components of students’ perceptions of open and affordable course materials – quality, integration, and experience – and discuss its reliability and predictive validity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors distributed an end-of-semester online survey to students enrolled in sections of 12 courses that adopted OER in Fall 2016, as well as conducting a within-interview survey with the instructors of those courses. The authors calculated the descriptive statistics from the responses to the student survey, as well as examining the inter-item and inter-rater reliability of the instrument. Finally, explored correlations in the data gathered through both the student and faculty surveys were explored.

Findings

The authors found that both students and faculty were generally pleased with the quality and experience of using open and affordable digital materials. The authors also found that our three survey subscales had strong inter-item reliability, and that the quality and experience subscales had predictive validity in terms of whether students would choose a traditional or digital text in future courses.

Originality/value

In addition to providing evidence in terms of the full survey instrument’s reliability and predictive validity, factor analysis indicates that a short scale of quality and experience Likert scale items could be used by practitioners to effectively assess satisfaction of digital materials among traditionally aged undergraduate students.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Laura Wimberley, Elizabeth Cheney and Yi Ding

The cost of course materials to the individual student has increased over the past decade, contributing to educational inequity. Open educational resources (OERs) may be a…

Abstract

Purpose

The cost of course materials to the individual student has increased over the past decade, contributing to educational inequity. Open educational resources (OERs) may be a solution and research validates their positive impact on student success outcomes (Colvard et al., 2018; Feldstein et al., 2012). Few studies, however, examine the role that library collections play in addressing course materials cost and student success. This paper aims to investigate whether materials costs are a significant factor in course pass rate and whether the library has a positive impact on pass rates.

Design/methodology/approach

Using required texts listed in syllabi for select undergraduate courses at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), the authors compare course materials costs for each course to the pass rate. The authors then measure the impact of course materials cost on the achievement gap between Pell Grant eligible and non-eligible students.

Findings

This study confirms previous research indicating that reduced course materials costs have a measurable impact on student success, in that the total minimum cost of required materials has a statistically significant effect on the percentage of students who pass a course. However, course reserves slightly increase the disparity between high-income and low-income students, suggesting that course reserves are a less effective way of supporting the latter compared to OERs.

Originality/value

This study is unique in examining the effect of the cost of course materials on students, regardless of the source of cost reductions. Most literature focuses on the qualitative efficacy of OERs instead of measured impact or the relationship between the cost of course materials and student success. The authors investigate the connection between OERs, library engagement and student success.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Bennett Thomas

– The purpose of this paper is to show how a new academic library works.

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1039

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how a new academic library works.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used statistical data and anecdotal evidence.

Findings

The findings were that digital library materials have dramatically changed how libraries operate.

Originality/value

The library featured in this story is the University of Calgary’s main library which is called the Taylor Family Digital Library, which is meant to be a library with digital technology as its main focus.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Bennett Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to focus on major issues involved in setting up a digital library, with special attention given to the University of Calgary’s new Taylor…

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1811

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on major issues involved in setting up a digital library, with special attention given to the University of Calgary’s new Taylor Family Digital Library, which was started in 2006 and completed in 2011 at a cost of $203 million.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper will begin with a description of the targeted users. It will discuss user expectations for the digital library, which are often focused on the distributive function of the library to provide rapid and easy access to resources such as licensed e-journals and e-books. It will then explore issues related to the productive function, the digitization of collections. Finally, the paper will address the question: what purposes does digitization of collections serve?

Findings

Although digital materials are becoming more popular with university library users, university libraries are not yet ready to abandon print library materials altogether for a wide variety of reasons.

Originality/value

This is a case study of a library that claims to be unique: a university library which is truly digital in nature.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mohanbir Sawhney and Pallavi Goodman

PageWell, an e-reading platform provider, was preparing to launch PageWell 2.0 to the larger full-time MBA student market after a successful trial of PageWell 1.0 in…

Abstract

PageWell, an e-reading platform provider, was preparing to launch PageWell 2.0 to the larger full-time MBA student market after a successful trial of PageWell 1.0 in Executive MBA (EMBA) classes at the Kellogg School of Management. Research had shown that full-time MBA students would be very interested in using products that allowed electronic access to course materials everywhere and across many platforms and that allowed electronic note-taking and storage. To better understand this user group, PageWell conducted a market research survey of students, faculty, and administrators to gauge their needs, preferences, and potential interest in the PageWell product. The study revealed that MBA student usage patterns, scenarios, and behavior varied significantly from EMBA student needs and perceptions. PageWell now had the task of prioritizing the product requirements and recalibrating the market requirements document to more accurately reflect student needs and thus create a viable product

After students have analyzed the case, they will be able to:

  • Use customer feedback to help define requirements for a new product

  • Understand the role of personas and scenarios in defining requirements

  • Understand how to use scenarios and scenario templates to derive scenario implementation requirements

  • Understand how to prioritize scenarios based on customer, company, and competitive criteria

  • Write a market requirements document for a next-version technology produc

Use customer feedback to help define requirements for a new product

Understand the role of personas and scenarios in defining requirements

Understand how to use scenarios and scenario templates to derive scenario implementation requirements

Understand how to prioritize scenarios based on customer, company, and competitive criteria

Write a market requirements document for a next-version technology produc

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Flipped Approach to Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-743-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Zsuzsa Koltay, Ben Trelease and Philip M. Davis

Cornell University's Albert R. Mann Library was featured in a 1994 Library Hi Tech issue as a prototype of the electronic library. Mann Library, the winner of the American…

Abstract

Cornell University's Albert R. Mann Library was featured in a 1994 Library Hi Tech issue as a prototype of the electronic library. Mann Library, the winner of the American Library Association's first Library of the Future award, presented its systematic approach to creating a new digital research library, an approach that employs modern methods rooted in classic principles to form a vibrant, organic whole by integrating the print and the digital library. Mann's approach is based on having a clear understanding of what our mission is and constantly rethinking what we are doing to achieve it. Consequently, a lot has happened at Mann since 1994. This article describes the library's new program of instructional technology support, while a series of short reports focus on some of the other Mann Library projects.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Chih‐Ming Chen and Chia‐Chi Chen

This paper seeks to assess the differences between learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use digital resources in the Taiwan Libraries' History Digital

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5128

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the differences between learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use digital resources in the Taiwan Libraries' History Digital Library (organized digital resources) and the Google search engine (unorganized digital resources) in problem‐solving learning for the same subject via the problem‐based learning (PBL) mode. The paper aims to explore the advantages and characteristics of using digital archives to support PBL and to offer suggestions that are helpful when using digital archives to support e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the quasi‐experimental design method to assign all participants into an experimental group and control group to evaluate differences in learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use different digital resources during PBL processes. A statistical analysis scheme was employed to evaluate the learning performance of learners during PBL supported by different digital resources in terms of learning processes, PBL outcomes, and a questionnaire.

Findings

The study obtained the following conclusions: learning performance and the satisfaction of learners in the experimental group during PBL processes supported by digital archival resources were superior to those of control‐group learners who were supported by search engine resources; compared with search engine resources, the digital archival resources provide benefits in the learning phase, such as “action” (i.e. doing), in the proposed PBL mode, which has three learning phases; and compared with resources accessed through the Google search engine, PBL supported by digital archival resources should enhance searching performance and thereby increase learner willingness to use digital archives during e‐learning.

Practical implications

Using digital archives to support e‐learning is a new trend in the library sciences field; however, few studies have developed useful learning modes for effective e‐learning supported by digital archives. Evidential research related to e‐learning supported by digital archives is also lacking; most studies used digital archives as digital course materials, thus ignoring the principal property of digital archives – excellent resource organization.

Originality/value

The paper shows that by integrating the PBL mode with digital archives one can identify the advantages of digital archives in supporting e‐learning, resulting in innovative and valuable research.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

William D. Muirhead

Online education with Internet technology has been used extensively in post‐secondary education, but it is relatively new in schools. It has considerable potential for…

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4738

Abstract

Online education with Internet technology has been used extensively in post‐secondary education, but it is relatively new in schools. It has considerable potential for enhancing teaching/learning in both traditional schools and home‐schooling. Describes research conducted in Alberta where online education in schools is more common than in any other Canadian province. Semi‐structured interviews were held with 13 teachers from four online schools. Although they reported increased workloads and stress associated with added responsibilities for authoring online courses, providing technological support, and enhancing their technological skills, the teachers perceived many benefits of online education. However, improvements in the scope and reliability of technology and better access to digital educational content are required to realize the full potential of online education in schools. The information presented has relevance to school systems in many countries. It also relates to the rapidly evolving role of technology in education for all ages.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Steven Ackerman, Margaret Mooney, Stefanie Morrill, Joshua Morrill, Mary Thompson and Lika K. Balenovich

Web-based courses are a practical way to engage in meaningful discussions with learners from a diverse set of communities. By gathering online to learn about a topic…

Abstract

Purpose

Web-based courses are a practical way to engage in meaningful discussions with learners from a diverse set of communities. By gathering online to learn about a topic, learners can form communities that transcend geographic and political boundaries. This paper aims to investigate a partnership between the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) and Wisconsin Library Services, which brought open access online learning to thousands of lifelong learners around the state of Wisconsin. “Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region”, a massive open online course the UW-Madison launched in 2015, paired a regional focus with face-to-face discussions at 21 public libraries to deepen learners’ personal connections to the subject matter. Through strategic partnership, targeted course development and marketing of events, intimate local discussion sessions and statewide events provided fora in which Wisconsin residents would explore changing weather and climate with university faculty, staff and students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study approach and firsthand interview feedback from librarians, library staff and university faculty and staff who were leading the effort.

Findings

This paper explores the lessons learned and practical implications from the project and offers insight into libraries and universities looking to engage specific communities in non-credit online learning projects into the future.

Originality/value

This effort was a first of its kind partnership for the University and the State of Wisconsin.

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