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Article

Jeffrey W. Alstete, John P. Meyer and Nicholas J. Beutell

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to utilize an exploratory multiple-case design research method using three undergraduate management courses at a medium-sized private comprehensive college near a large metropolitan area in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores differentiated instruction in relation to experiential learning in management education by examining three teaching applications from different management courses to illustrate these concepts.

Findings

The use of differentiated instruction in management education is supported through varied approaches such as individual student and team-based scaffolding that demonstrate the applicability of differentiation. In addition to improving student learning, other benefits include improved student retention and faculty autonomy in course creation and delivery. The implementation involves a proactive response to learner needs informed by a faculty perspective that recognizes student diversity yet retains quality assurance standards with mindful assessment and planning.

Research limitations/implications

The comparatively small number of courses and instructional methods may make the specific findings and examples more relevant to the type of institution examined. Yet, the general conclusions and methods identified have potential implications for learners in a wide variety of colleges and universities.

Practical implications

Differentiated instruction may be a useful approach for enhancing learning in heterogenous groups of students by recognizing student readiness and making appropriate modifications.

Originality/value

This paper offers an exploratory overview of differentiated instruction with guidance for management faculty members in designing and implementing these approaches in their courses.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part

Patricia Paugh and Mary Brady

Purpose – To provide educators with an overview of issues and strategies important for preparing preservice teachers to plan instruction, engage students, and assess…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide educators with an overview of issues and strategies important for preparing preservice teachers to plan instruction, engage students, and assess learning in culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter reviews sociocultural, sociolinguistic, and cognitive literature that informs differentiated instruction for linguistic diversity. It then offers a case study example of a preservice student teaching seminar where this knowledge was put into practice.

Findings – Content provides detailed information about the design of a preservice seminar that included the role of a nationally piloted performance assessment. It demonstrates how preparing the assessment portfolio provided a vehicle for a structured and useful focus on diversity within the seminar.

Research limitations/implications – The chapter highlights literature that is specifically useful for preservice teachers and their instructors who are seeking to address the specific needs of English Language Learners and the culturally diverse population of students found in U.S. classrooms. This is important to those who seek to expand this attention to diversity within general teacher education practices.

Practical implications – This chapter serves as a resource for all clinical instructors, providing ideas for incorporation into their clinics and classrooms.

Originality/value of paper – Culturally responsive teaching and a specific focus on teaching English Language Arts for linguistically diverse students are infused in clinical teacher education practices rather than as “add-on” practices.

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Book part

Mary Shea and Rosemary Murray

Purpose – To provide teachers with an outline of characteristics typically associated with young adolescent students and the nature of effective teaching and learning…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide teachers with an outline of characteristics typically associated with young adolescent students and the nature of effective teaching and learning opportunities appropriate at this distinct level of human growth and development.Design/methodology/approach – The chapter presents concepts associated with differentiated instruction and authentic learning activities; both are examined as central when exploring ways to close the learning gap between students of poverty and their more advantaged peers.Findings – The goals of establishing effective pedagogy and closing demographic achievement gaps based on test scores must be addressed in parallel since closing the latter without addressing the first does not produce lasting effects.Research limitations/implications – The authors present a sampling of researchers’ findings related to effective pedagogy for adolescent learners; these include conclusions on differentiated instruction, developmentally appropriate curriculum, technological literacy, inquiry, project-based, and expeditionary learning.Practical implications – Factors that make particular middle schools in a large urban area effective are examined as well as each school’s partnership connection with a college literacy program.Originality/value of chapter – Teachers’ adherence to research-tested methodologies appropriate for adolescent learners requires knowledge of valid, reliable sources, and successful models of implementation.

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Book part

Michelle Trotman Scott

African-American and Hispanic students are underrepresented in gifted education. In many cases, African-American and Hispanic students are underachieving in the classroom…

Abstract

African-American and Hispanic students are underrepresented in gifted education. In many cases, African-American and Hispanic students are underachieving in the classroom setting and lack interest in what is being taught. This chapter will discuss the underrepresentation of African-American and Hispanic students in gifted programs, curricula and program challenges within general and gifted classrooms, Bloom’s taxonomy and James Banks’ multicultural curriculum model. The chapter will also provide an overview of the Ford–Harris matrix, and introduce a color-coded layout of the matrix and provide pros and cons for each matrix level.

Details

Gifted Education: Current Perspectives and Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-741-2

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Book part

Stephanie Al Otaiba, Carol MacDonald Connor, Barbara Foorman, Luana Greulich and Jessica S. Folsom

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe a synergistic “hybrid” model of Response to Intervention (RtI) that combines individualized effective Tier 1 classroom…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe a synergistic “hybrid” model of Response to Intervention (RtI) that combines individualized effective Tier 1 classroom instruction with powerful early intervening services. First, we provide an overview and explain how RtI traditionally has been conceptualized. Next, we illustrate how to implement a hybrid model that focuses on beginning reading instruction and also incorporates additional school-level resources. Finally, we will discuss implementation issues related to identifying children who need additional intervention and propose directions for future research.

Details

Policy and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-311-8

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Book part

Christina Borders, Stephanie Woodley and Elizabeth Moore

Inclusion is meant to address the needs of all students in the classroom including those who are identified as gifted and talented. Unfortunately, this population is often…

Abstract

Inclusion is meant to address the needs of all students in the classroom including those who are identified as gifted and talented. Unfortunately, this population is often excluded from funding and differentiated support. This chapter addresses the disparities of definitions and legislation for gifted students. Common characteristics including strengths and concerns of the students and gifted education in general will also be discussed. Teachers must learn to effectively implement differentiated instruction as well as choose appropriate curricular models and instructional strategies to make their classroom truly inclusive of all learners. Pull-out, push-in, self-contained setting, cluster grouping, and enrichment programs have all been found to be effective service models for gifted students. Within the environment strategies such as independent study, learning stations, tiered lessons, and problem-based learning can further individualize student learning. Final recommendations on the future of gifted education will be addressed.

Details

Gifted Education: Current Perspectives and Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-741-2

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Book part

J. Helen Perkins and Crystal D. Cook

Purpose – To identify effective literacy instructional strategies and methods based on assessment. Also, to provide information on literacy experts that teachers may seek…

Abstract

Purpose – To identify effective literacy instructional strategies and methods based on assessment. Also, to provide information on literacy experts that teachers may seek advice from as they work with striving readers.

Approach – A review of literature and the research on teaching striving readers were examined.

Practical implications – Reading is an important determining factor in efficacious learning and overall literacy; students must possess the necessary literacy skills to become successful and productive citizens in an information age. Throughout the chapter, a striving reader is presented while offering the reader an authentic example of a striving reader. The strategies, methods, and experts offer best practices; these will enhance the student(s) literacy skills.

Originality/value of paper – Educators utilizing the information provided in this chapter will be enhanced in their ability to effectively teach their students.

Details

Using Informative Assessments towards Effective Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-630-0

Keywords

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Book part

Mary T. Brownell, Alexandra Lauterbach, Amber Benedict, Jenna Kimerling, Elizabeth Bettini and Kristin Murphy

Successful implementation of Response to Intervention frameworks in schools requires general and special education teachers to have well-integrated knowledge bases for…

Abstract

Successful implementation of Response to Intervention frameworks in schools requires general and special education teachers to have well-integrated knowledge bases for providing instruction and intervention in reading and behavior. Implementation-focused approaches to changing teacher behavior, favored traditionally in special education, however, are unlikely to help teachers acquire such knowledge. In this chapter, we discuss the knowledge and practice that defines expert teachers in reading and behavior and how such expertise might be achieved through practice-focused approaches to initial teacher education and professional development.

Details

Classroom Behavior, Contexts, and Interventions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-972-1

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Book part

Michael L. Wehmeyer, Karrie Shogren, Miguel Angel Verdugo, Laura Nota, Salvatore Soresi, Suk-Hyang Lee and Yves Lachapelle

Historically, the condition we now refer to as intellectual disability has been conceptualized using models that were extension of the medical model. Recent advances…

Abstract

Historically, the condition we now refer to as intellectual disability has been conceptualized using models that were extension of the medical model. Recent advances, however, have emphasized person-environment fit models of disability that view disability, intellectual, and other cognitive disabilities, as the lack of fit between a person’s capacities and the demands of the context. This chapter examines these shifts in conceptualization and the ways in which this changes how interventions are designed to provide support to enable people with intellectual disability to live, learn, work, and play in their communities. Such interventions and supports include issues pertaining to Universal Design for Learning, multi-tiered systems of supports, and the primacy of promoting the self-determination of people with disabilities. The importance of efforts to promote social inclusion is also discussed, as well as strategies to promote transition to adulthood. Authors from several countries provide examples of how these new intervention paradigms are being implemented across the world.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

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Article

Anne Arendt, Angela Trego and Jonathan Allred

– The purpose of this paper is to show that cafeteria style grading actually provides a course structure which encourages students to go beyond expectations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that cafeteria style grading actually provides a course structure which encourages students to go beyond expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

Three instructors offered a total of 13 sections of a general education science class called “Fundamentals of Technology” from January 2012 to December 2013 using a cafeteria-style grading method. This means students get to choose to do those assignments, quizzes or tests that appeal to their own learning interests or styles and do not need to complete all the assignments to get an A grade. Rather, they complete those assignments desired in order to earn the applicable points. This paper researches the combined results of over 400 students to assess the success of cafeteria style grading.

Findings

These instructors found that half the students overall obtain an A grade and 9 percent of all students actually go above and beyond the requirements of an A grade by at least 5 percent. Actually, about 4 percent of students complete more than is required by an additional 10 percent or more.

Originality/value

Cafeteria style grading is a little researched methodology for student assessment. The research shows that cafeteria style grading actually provides a course structure which encourages students to go beyond expectations.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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