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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2021

David Emanuel Andersson, Dieter Bögenhold and Marek Hudik

The purpose of this paper is to explore the entrepreneurial and policy consequences of the structural changes associated with postindustrialization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the entrepreneurial and policy consequences of the structural changes associated with postindustrialization.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach uses Schumpeterian and institutional theories to predict the consequences of postindustrialization on four types of innovative markets: global mass markets; global niche markets; local mass markets and local niche markets.

Findings

The paper makes two key predictions. First, global mass markets will account for most cost-cutting process innovations. Second, niche markets, whether global or local, will provide the bulk of product innovations. Opportunities for product innovations in niche markets multiply both as the result of a more complex economy and as the result of heterogeneous preferences of consumers with divergent learning trajectories.

Social implications

The key implication of the theoretical pattern prediction of this paper is that there are increasing opportunities for entrepreneurs to introduce novelties that cater to niche demands, and this includes new lifestyle communities. The increasing diversity of values and preferences implies that one-size-fit-all policies are becoming increasingly inimical to the entrepreneurial discovery of higher-valued resource uses.

Originality/value

This paper takes a standard prediction of entrepreneurial theories – that innovations become more common with an increase in economy-wide product complexity – and extends this to increasing complexity on the consumption side. With increases in opportunities for learning, consumers diverge and develop disparate lifestyles. The resultant super-diversity, which multiplies consumption niches to a much greater extent than what ethnicity-based diversity indices would imply, makes it more difficult to achieve consensus about the desirability of public policies.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Dieter Bögenhold and Uwe Fachinger

The purpose of this study is to discuss the ongoing increase of female entrepreneurship within a broader context of influencing factors, especially within the division of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to discuss the ongoing increase of female entrepreneurship within a broader context of influencing factors, especially within the division of work. Talk about the rise and future of self-employment must be linked to the discussion about changes in the structure of occupations, labour markets and regulations and gender. The increase of the service sector and the continuous rise of the liberal professions mirror changes within the category of self-employment. All different items are embedded into a general trend of a growing knowledge society. A fundamental question is how gender matters when investigating these trends. Do we find specific “gender patterns” or will the new chances and risks lead to a greater equality of opportunities? Is the increase of solo self-employment of females driven by the need to earn a living, or is it the result of females taking the risk, e.g., to become more economically independent?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines conceptual thoughts on the development of self-employment and gender within stratified modern societies with empirical reflections based on public census data for Germany. The research delves deeper into the different segments of the employment system and connects empirical findings with the theoretical discussion on professional groups in modern capitalist societies.

Findings

We learn to acknowledge that the rise of self-employment is mostly supported by the rise of micro-firms and solo self-employment, of which especially solo self-employment is a female domain. The independent liberal professions also indicate a significant revival of female labour.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the increasing expansion of self-employment and specific gender patterns within this trend.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Teemu Kautonen, Ulla Hytti, Dieter Bögenhold and Jarna Heinonen

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of job satisfaction on the intended retirement age of self‐employed and organisationally‐employed white‐collar…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of job satisfaction on the intended retirement age of self‐employed and organisationally‐employed white‐collar professionals. The analysis also examines potential boundary conditions imposed by other domains of life for the applicability of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs ordered probit regressions to analyse primary survey data comprising 1,262 Finnish white‐collar professionals.

Findings

The econometric results suggest that job satisfaction is a significant determinant of the intention to retire later and thus prolong a career. The analysis does not find a difference in the effect of job satisfaction between salary earners and self‐employed individuals. However, the analysis finds that other domains of life influence how job satisfaction affects retirement‐age intentions, and that these influences differ between self‐employed and salaried respondents.

Practical implications

The findings imply that developing measures to improve the job satisfaction of (highly educated) older workers is an alternative to the widely debated regulatory approach of prolonging working careers by increasing the statutory retirement age. The principal limitation is the focus on white‐collar professionals in a single country.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical comparison of the effect of job satisfaction on the intended retirement age between salary earners and self‐employed individuals. It is also the first examination of the effect of job satisfaction on retirement intentions or behaviour that accounts for the effects of other domains of life satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Elisabet Ljunggren and Elisabeth Sundin

This paper introduces the special issue’s six articles with different approaches to investigating gender perspectives on enterprising communities. The papers’ approaches…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces the special issue’s six articles with different approaches to investigating gender perspectives on enterprising communities. The papers’ approaches are presented and discussed, and the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how they relate to the two main concepts of gender and enterprising communities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual.

Findings

Through the discussion of the articles, the concept of enterprising communities is found to be fuzzy and to contain a multitude of meanings. This paper elaborates on the community concept and its spatial and “of practice” dimensions.

Originality/value

First, the paper contributes by suggesting how the enterprising community concept could be delimited. Second, the research article contributes to gender perspectives on enterprising communities. It elaborates on what gendered enterprising communities are and how gender might influence enterprising communities.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Documents from and on Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-450-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Robert D. Hisrich and Barra O’Cinneide

Since 1980, there has been an increasing interest in the area of innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. While the role of educational institutions in the…

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1308

Abstract

Since 1980, there has been an increasing interest in the area of innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development. While the role of educational institutions in the entrepreneurship/new venture creation process has been recognized, little research has been done, particularly outside the US, to identify the type and extent of involvement in this area by these institutions. Looks at the activities of European third‐level educational institutions in Western Europe, Sweden, Finland, Eastern and Central Europe, and some of the Republics of the former USSR. Universities in these geographic areas were surveyed regarding the extent (if any) of their activities in four primary areas of entrepreneurship: educational programmes; training programmes; research; and enterprise formation. There were 109 of the 227 institutions from 23 countries which responded ‐ a 48 per cent response rate. Institutions were more inclined to be involved in research than education, training and actual venture creation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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