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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Lambrini Karaglani and Emma Derbyshire

It has been proposed that the Greek diet is changing and becoming increasingly Westernized. Although previous studies have assessed the diet of Greek adults, few have…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been proposed that the Greek diet is changing and becoming increasingly Westernized. Although previous studies have assessed the diet of Greek adults, few have focused on the elderly in detail. The aims of the present investigation are to: assess habitual dietary intakes of elderly residents living in Athens and compare the modern Greek diet to the traditional Greek diet and UK recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty‐five free‐living males and 27 females (mean age 71.3 years, SD 7.2) living in Athens completed a background information questionnaire and 24‐h dietary recall.

Findings

Dietary protein, total fat and sodium exceeded dietary guidelines. Energy intake, non‐starch polysaccharide, vitamin D and calcium were below UK recommended levels of intake. Findings indicate that the diet of elderly residents living in Athens appears to be moving away from the traditional Greek diet.

Research limitations/implications

It was a limitation that a larger study population was not recruited. However, due to limited resources, this was only intended to be a small‐scale preliminary study.

Originality/value

This appears to be one of the few studies to investigate the dietary habits of the Greek elderly, prospectively.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Laure Saulais, Maurice Doyon, Bernard Ruffieux and Harry Kaiser

The purpose of this paper is to compare knowledge about dietary fats in some dairy products and other foods across consumers from France, (French‐speaking) Canada and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare knowledge about dietary fats in some dairy products and other foods across consumers from France, (French‐speaking) Canada and the USA. A relation is explored between the types of information, knowledge levels and obesity predominance.

Design/methodology/approach

A nine‐question nutritional test was developed and administered to three samples of consumers, respectively in Grenoble (France), Quebec, Canada and Ithaca, New York. In France, Canada and the USA the number of participants was respectively 100, 107 and 120. Participants were recruited randomly outside groceries stores and the test was administered directly through one‐on‐one interviews.

Findings

Results indicate a significant gap in knowledge between consumers from the three countries studied. The level and quality of knowledge seems to be correlated with the nature of the informational background: a wider availability of information such as nutrition facts and public health recommendations on fat consumption seems to have a positive effect on the general level of knowledge. However, “technical” knowledge seems to be inversely correlated to the level of obesity.

Research limitations/implications

This work is of an exploratory nature and the sample might not be representative of the countries' population. Further works that link food knowledge and food consumption patterns would be needed.

Practical implications

This study gives weight to the hypothesis that a “science” or nutrient approach to food might not result in appropriate food choices; consumers losing sight of the big picture. To confirm this hypothesis, further work would be needed.

Originality/value

This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first cross‐country study that attempts to link the type of knowledge on fat in food and predominance of obesity. This should encourage nutritionist to further investigate this link. It should also concern the dairy industry, given most often consumers' perception of dairy products' fat content is overestimated, especially for fluid milk in France.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

David Richardson and Maeve Brady

Considers the specific contributions of the industry to health promotion and policy making, within the context of Health of the Nation activities and the development of…

Abstract

Considers the specific contributions of the industry to health promotion and policy making, within the context of Health of the Nation activities and the development of effective nutrition policies for the UK. States that the UK food and drink industry is the largest manufacturing sector in the UK and plays a vital role in the country’s economy. Aims to satisfy consumer needs and expectations by supplying a wide variety of wholesome, safe, enjoyable, nutritious and value for money products, all year round, in a way that is responsible both to society and the consumer. Discusses how the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) represents and promotes the industry’s common interests by developing and implementing policies and information and education programmes on all key issues. Says FDF believes that it is essential that dietary advice is firmly based on sound, scientific data and that consumers are able to make informed choices from the wide variety of foods that are available to them.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

David P. Richardson

The food and drink manufacturing industry is one of the leadingsectors with considerable expertise in food and nutrition. In order tohelp the Government achieve the…

Abstract

The food and drink manufacturing industry is one of the leading sectors with considerable expertise in food and nutrition. In order to help the Government achieve the targets set by the Health of the Nation White Paper, it is committed to making significant contributions through product developments and the provision of information. It is essential, however, that nutrition policy and dietary advice are based on sound science and that consumers are educated to make informed choices.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Jan Darrall

Healthy eating has been at the forefront of media and medicalcircles in recent years. Discusses the awareness and response of thefood chain (multiple retailers, food…

Abstract

Healthy eating has been at the forefront of media and medical circles in recent years. Discusses the awareness and response of the food chain (multiple retailers, food companies and farmers) to the healthy eating trends and reports. Retailers were the most aware of healthy eating, and had reacted positively in line with the trends and dietary recommendations. This contrasted with farmers, many of whom were unaware of the dietary messages, and few of whom had responded to them, reflecting the lack of Government support for organic agriculture, and dairy farmers being paid to produce high and not low‐fat milk. When the nature of Government support changes, the food chain will respond more efficiently to consumer demands for healthy eating. Based on research involving 683 farmers, food companies and retailers in the food chain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Joe Bogue, Thérèse Coleman and Douglas Sorenson

The objectives of this study were: to investigate Irish consumers' attitudes to diet, health and health‐enhancing foods; to determine Irish consumers' knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this study were: to investigate Irish consumers' attitudes to diet, health and health‐enhancing foods; to determine Irish consumers' knowledge and awareness of the health benefits of health‐enhancing foods; to examine the health‐related factors perceived to be most important in food choice; and to examine the relationships between attitudes, beliefs and dietary behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 340 questionnaires were distributed to consumers using a multi‐stage cluster‐sampling technique.

Findings

The key variables that accounted for the variation in dietary behaviour were attitudes to healthy food behaviours, perceived influence of diet on health, and nutrition knowledge. Differences were observed between attitudes and awareness of health‐enhancing foods across gender, age and social grouping.

Research limitations/implications

The results and conclusions of this research are derived from a study conducted in Dublin only and, therefore, it is not possible to generalise about the Irish population from these results. It would prove beneficial to conduct further consumer research on determinants of consumers' dietary behaviour for health‐enhancing foods at different urban and rural centres in Ireland, as well as across European states for a cross‐cultural perspective.

Practical implications

Market segmentation, accompanied by appropriate carefully targeted educational messages, and addressing the attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of the target group can help to close the gap between actual and healthful diets for the entire population.

Originality/value

This research can assist health policy makers implement promotional strategies to improve the nutritional status of at‐risk groups while supporting efforts by the food industry in identifying appropriate marketing strategies within the healthy foods sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Elaine Fullard

In Elaine Fullard's opinion, many people are ignorant about nutrition because the health professionals and teachers fail to communicate the right information. She believes…

Abstract

In Elaine Fullard's opinion, many people are ignorant about nutrition because the health professionals and teachers fail to communicate the right information. She believes that the recommendations for dietary change given in Eating for Health, the DHSS publication, assume too high a level of nutrition knowledge among the general public, a belief confirmed in a survey she carried out herself among a small random sample of adults. Miss Fullard found that there was not only ignorance about the constituents and functions of everyday foods, but also how to use less familiar food items in family meals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Mabel Blades

This article focuses on the dietary requirements of people with Diabetes Mellitus, both insulin dependent and non‐insulin dependent. It is one disorder where good dietary

Abstract

This article focuses on the dietary requirements of people with Diabetes Mellitus, both insulin dependent and non‐insulin dependent. It is one disorder where good dietary management can benefit control, well being and avoid complications. The guidelines for dietary intake for those with Diabetes Mellitus both past and present are given. The recommended intake of carbohydrate, fruit and vegetables, sugar, protein, fat, salt and alcohol are also discussed. The study itself focuses on the organisations involved in producing diet sheets for people with Diabetes Mellitus. The article also gives information on how to obtain such publications.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Mahsa Mohajeri, Shiva Hoojeghani, Farhad Pourfarzi, Mohammad Ghahremanzadeh and Ali Barzegar

Obesity is a multi-factorial problem that develops from an interaction between diet, genetics, physical activity, medication, and other factors. This paper aims to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

Obesity is a multi-factorial problem that develops from an interaction between diet, genetics, physical activity, medication, and other factors. This paper aims to examine the association between dietary diversity score (DDS) and obesity among adults of Ardebil.

Design/methodology/approach

This case-control study was conducted on 204 cases (obese and overweight participants) and 204 controls (healthy weight individuals) matched by socioeconomic status (SES), age (older than 30 years) and sex. Dietary intake was assessed using a 24 h food recall questionnaire. Data on physical activity and socio-demographic variables were gathered. DDS was computed based on the scoring of the 14 food groups recommended by the Food and Agriculture organization guideline.

Findings

The DDS of the obese group was higher (5.02 ± 1.02) than that of the healthy weight group (4.23 ± 1.18) (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between DDS and body mass index (BMI) in both groups of study, but this association was more significant in the obese group (β = 0.501, p = 0.021) than that of healthy weight group (β = 0.413, p= 0.042). Vegetable food group score in both groups of the study was associated with obesity inversely (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

This study was conducted for the first time in Ardabil city and the results showed for the first time that there is a relationship between dietary diversity and obesity. People with a higher dietary diversity score are more likely to be obese. In fact, this study for the first time proved that people who are obese have a more varied diet but less vegetables and fruits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2018

T. Colin Campbell and T. Nelson Campbell

Nutrition, as a science, is poorly understood, both professionally and publicly. The confusion that surrounds this science makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to…

Abstract

Nutrition, as a science, is poorly understood, both professionally and publicly. The confusion that surrounds this science makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to formulate public health policy, which creates opportunities for political manipulation and control. Nutrition, for a century or more, has been variously described as a summation of the physiological and biochemical properties of individual nutrients in food rather than the whole food itself. This infers that isolated nutrients in supplements will function in the same way as nutrients in food. It also infers that removing or minimizing “undesirable” nutrients from food will make the food more healthful. This arises from the highly reductionist way that we focus on individual nutrients minus their natural context, both the context within the foods of which they are a part and the context within biological systems where they function. The shortcomings of this belief system may be illustrated by hugely costly mistakes made in the past, even more than a century ago, that corrupt current practices. Such mistakes have become so embedded in the contemporary narrative on nutritional science, both fundamentally and practically, that we fail to recognize the damage they continue to cause.

Alternatively, when nutritional effects are considered more within their natural contexts, that is, more wholistically, then it helps to explain, for example, the remarkable ability of nutrition, as provided by a whole food plant-based diet, to prevent even to cure varied types of cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, the breadth of this nutritional effect for a wide variety of illnesses and diseases suggests that nutrition, properly provided by a whole food plant-based diet, is more efficacious than a combination of all the contemporary pills and procedures combined. It also suggests that genetic determinism is not the explanation for disease that is widely advanced. And finally, among still more consequences, there are many societal outcomes that can be substantially mitigated, including the escalating cost of health care and the dangerously increasing array of destructive practices that damage the environment. Many of the momentous health, economic, environmental and sociopolitical problems currently faced may be traced to a misunderstanding of the effects of food and nutrition. The task therefore is how to bring this message to the attention of a public who for too long have gradually adopted flawed food production and healthcare systems that are on the verge of collapse, threatening the collapse of entire societies as we know them. More specifically, a public and professional dialog on the meaning of nutrition, especially its wholistic properties, is desperately needed, especially in medical schools where nutrition as a science is almost totally ignored.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Health and Life Sciences Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-572-8

Keywords

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