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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Silambarasi Kuralneethi, Sharifah Intan Zainun Sharif Ishak and Vaidehi Ulaganathan

This study aims to determine the association between dietary quality and growth of the aboriginal primary school children in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the association between dietary quality and growth of the aboriginal primary school children in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional study was carried out in Negeri Sembilan. A total of 194 school-aged aboriginal children participated in the study. The dietary intake and socioeconomic status data were collected from the parents using an interviewer-administrated structured questionnaire comprised of sociodemographic questions and three days of dietary recall. The Malaysian Healthy Eating Index was used to determine the diet quality of children. WHO Anthro Plus software was used to determine the z-score of weight-for-age (WAZ), height-for-age (HAZ) and body mass index (BMI)-for-age (BAZ).

Findings

Among all children, 15, 9 and 5% of them were stunted, underweight and thin, respectively. On the other hand, 16 and 12% of the children were overweight and obese, respectively. The aboriginal children were at risk of poor diet quality (37.19 ± 12.07) and had high dietary protein and fat intake than national recommended nutrient intake. The children achieved micronutrients intake, except for calcium. There was no significant association between total diet quality scores with growth indices among the aboriginal children. There is significant negative correlation between dietary vitamin A intake with HAZ (r = −0.168, p < 0.05) and WAZ (r = −0.219, p < 0.05) z-score of the aboriginal children.

Originality/value

Although there was a reduction in under-nutrition among the aborigines, an increasing over-nutrition status among aborigines should be considered, especially in terms of poor dietary quality and intake.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2018

Reza Mahdavi, Faranak Halali, Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi and Majid Mobasseri

Dietary adherence may potentially affect dietary intake. Besides, type 2 diabetes and obesity are closely inter-related. This paper aims to investigate the associations…

Abstract

Purpose

Dietary adherence may potentially affect dietary intake. Besides, type 2 diabetes and obesity are closely inter-related. This paper aims to investigate the associations between barriers to dietary adherence and dietary intake among overweight/obese female patients with type 2 diabetes.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional study, 122 female patients with type 2 diabetes from Tabriz, Iran were recruited. All of them had received dietary recommendations from either a nutritionist or a physician. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured using standard methods. A 24-h dietary recall and food records assessed energy and macronutrient intake.

Findings

The mean BMI of the participants was 32.2 ± 4.3 kg/m2, and the mean daily total energy intake was 1909.5 (218.7) kcal. To assess the associations between barriers to dietary adherence and dietary intake, analysis of variance was used. Analysis revealed significant positive associations between energy intake and the barrier factors situational barriers/difficulty resisting temptation [B (SE) = 42.11 (20.50), p = 0.042], difficulty with meals and snacks plan [B (SE) = 36.13 (12.78), p = 0.005] and small portion sizes [B (SE) = 25.35 (13.58), p = 0.029].

Originality/value

Diet has a key role in type 2 diabetes management. The results highlight the need for the barriers to be addressed in nutritional programs targeted for patients with type 2 diabetes. Thereby, level of adherence to the recommended program, eating habits and diabetes management could improve.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Meng Lee Tan, Yit Siew Chin, Poh Ying Lim and Salma Faeza Ahmad Fuzi

Globally, iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the most common cause of anaemia during pregnancy. To date, there is lack of established studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Globally, iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the most common cause of anaemia during pregnancy. To date, there is lack of established studies investigating factors associated with iron status during pregnancy in Malaysia. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the associations of obstetrical characteristics and dietary intakes with iron status among pregnant women attending selected health clinics in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted among 436 third-trimester pregnant women aged 18–40 years, from six selected health clinics in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur. Data on obstetrical characteristics were extracted from the antenatal medical records. Dietary intakes were assessed using an adapted semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire via face-to-face interview. Venous blood samples were collected for the measurement of serum ferritin (SF) using ADVIA Centaur analyser to determine iron status.

Findings

Approximately one in four of the pregnant women (25.9%) had iron deficiency, with mean SF of 33.35 ± 25.77µg/l. Factors associated with SF were parity (B = −3.048, p < 0.05), frequency of antenatal care visits (B = 1.456, p < 0.05), haemoglobin (Hb) (B = 3.890, p < 0.05), iron intake (B = 0.010, p < 0.05) and frequency of dietary iron supplementation consumption (B = 3.333, p < 0.05). Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that dietary factors were significantly associated with SF, after accounting for the obstetrical characteristics.

Originality/value

Besides obstetrical factors, the findings emphasised the importance of dietary factors on iron status during pregnancy. Nutrition consultation service particularly on the sources of iron intake and compliance towards dietary iron supplementation shall be provided to all pregnant women.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Agim Rysha, Tahire M. Gjergji and Angelika Ploeger

The study aims to assess the dietary habits and frequency of food intake by preschool-aged children in Kosovo.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to assess the dietary habits and frequency of food intake by preschool-aged children in Kosovo.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a survey of meal patterning and frequency of food group intake, using a combined 24-hour recall and Dietary history questionnaires. The assessment took place in different towns of Kosovo. Parents completed 232 questionnaires with data on dietary habits and food frequency intake of their children. Intake frequencies were computed and included in the analyses.

Findings

Dietary habits and frequency of food intake for specific foods (the main typical foods from the food groups) did not show significant differences (P > 0.05) between age groups, except in terms of milk consumption (P < 0.05) and soft drinks intake (P < 0.001). It was found that the consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as other high-fiber foods is very limited.

Research limitations

Despite the limitation in terms of sample, the results can be used by Kosovo’s authorities as an indication for an assessment of child’s development patterns in the country.

Originality/value

This assessment reports for the first time the dietary habits and frequency of food intake by preschool-aged children in Kosovo. The dietary pattern was shown to be low in wholegrain products and fruits and vegetables, and high in soft drinks and sweet and salty foods. Health and education authorities should develop national programs and dietary guidelines on recommended dietary intakes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Vijaya Juturu, Anne Daly, Jeff Geohas, Manley Finch and James R. Komorowski

Many foods naturally contain dietary Cr, but lost during processing and cooking. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been associated with poor glycemic control and low Cr…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many foods naturally contain dietary Cr, but lost during processing and cooking. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been associated with poor glycemic control and low Cr status. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate the dietary Cr intake and its relationship with diabetes risk factors in moderately obese subjects with T2DM.

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty‐six subjects (age: 26–65 years) were recruited through local advertisements. Subjects were taking stable doses of oral antidiabetic medication(s) excluding concomitant insulin. Subjects had HbA1c ≥7 per cent, persistent impaired glucose control (2 hour glucose >200 mg dL−1) and at least a one‐year history of T2DM. Demographic characteristics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), family and medical history were recorded. Three‐day dietary intakes were collected and evaluated for Cr and nutrient content using Nutritionist V software. Plasma glucose, circulating insulin and lipid profile were analyzed. Homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (IR), beta cell function (BCF) and derived ratios were calculated. Morning void urinary chromium levels were also measured.

Findings

It was observed that mean dietary Cr intake of adults (30 mcg) was below the suggested recommended daily intake (RDI) of 120 mcg day−1. These estimates correspond to approximately 16.4 μg Cr per 1000 Kcals. A significant correlation was observed between dietary Cr and fasting insulin (p<0.05), total‐C (p<0.05), LDL‐C (p<0.01), triglycerides (p<0.05), BCF (p<0.05), TG/HDL‐C ratio (p<0.01), HOMA BCF (p<0.05) and with atherogenic index in plasma (p<0.05).

Originality/value

In this study, the consumption of chromium is less than the RDI. Overall the results suggest that the US diets are inadequate in the essential metal chromium. Further studies are required to explore the relationship of Cr absorption with dietary Cr intake and risk factors in T2DM.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Reema Tayyem, Rawan Al-Qawasmeh and Nahla Khawaja

This paper aims to evaluate macro- and micronutrient intake among Jordanian adults who have metabolic syndrome (MetS) and those MetS-free.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate macro- and micronutrient intake among Jordanian adults who have metabolic syndrome (MetS) and those MetS-free.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 154 Jordanian adults aged 20-55 years were enrolled from The National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics in this case control study. In total, 77 newly diagnosed cases of MetS and 77 controls were recruited and matched by age and sex. Dietary data were collected by face-to-face interview using a validated food frequency questionnaire.

Findings

After adjustment of the energy intake and macronutrients, the cases reported significantly higher intake of the amount of protein (p < 0.001), carbohydrates (p < 0.001), fiber (p < 0.001), sugar (p < 0.001), fat (p < 0.001), saturated fat (p < 0.001), monounsaturated (p < 0.001), polyunsaturated (p < 0.001), trans-fat (p < 0.029), omega-3 (p < 0.001) and omega-6 (p < 0.001) as compared to the controls. The results also showed that the intake of some micronutrients was significantly higher among cases when compared to the controls. In this study, three dietary patterns have been itemized; “fast food dietary pattern”, “Mediterranean dietary pattern” and “high-protein dietary pattern”. Only a direct significant trend between MetS and fast food pattern was detected (p-trend = 0.001). Neither significant associations nor trends were detected in the Mediterranean and high-protein patterns with MetS risk.

Originality/value

The study findings highlighted the presence of associations between fast food dietary pattern, total energy and some macro- and micronutrients intake and the risk of MetS among population living in the Middle East. Even though the findings of this study bridge the gap between theory and practice, a large scale population-based study is warranted to confirm these findings.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Minatsu Kobayashi, Sayo Uesugi, Reiko Hikosaka and Rieko Aikawa

This paper aims to examine the effects of professional job experience on the lifestyle and dietary habits of participants who have studied food science and nutrition and…

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351

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of professional job experience on the lifestyle and dietary habits of participants who have studied food science and nutrition and acquired a dietitian license. The dietary habits of students of departments of food science and nutrition have been reported. However, no study has compared the dietary habits of graduates with and without actual clinical experience.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 206 participants who graduated from the department of food science and nutrition of a university located in Tokyo between 1975 and 1984 completed a questionnaire on food and nutrient intake and lifestyle habits in 2011.

Findings

Total fat and SFA intake adjusted for energy intake or frequency of snack and fast food intake differed among participants with and without experience as dietitians, indicating that dietitian experience influenced the dietary habits of participants for approximately 30 years after graduation. Nutritional knowledge and skills acquired during attendance at a dietitian school are effective in maintaining favorable behavior for a long time. However, nutritional knowledge and skills were enhanced by later professional experience.

Originality/value

The refining effect of clinical experience appears to contribute to the maintenance of daily dietary habits and health. Professional experience can contribute to the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases not only personally but also for other people in terms of public health nutrition or nutritional education.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Shirin Amini, Sima Jafarirad, Reza Amani, Mehdi Sayyah Bargard, Bahman Cheraghian and Ali Asghar Hemmati

Post-partum depression (PPD) is a mood disorder that affects 20-40 per cent of women in their post-delivery period worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-partum depression (PPD) is a mood disorder that affects 20-40 per cent of women in their post-delivery period worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to compare dietary intakes of energy, macronutrients, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), some micronutrients and antioxidants in PPD patients with healthy controls.

Design/methodology/approach

This case-control study was conducted on 163 women in postpartum period (81 PPD and 82 non-PPD) using Edinburgh questionnaire for the diagnosis of PPD. Dietary nutrients intake was assessed using 147-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Portion sizes of food items were converted to grams per day. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between tertiles of dietary intakes with the odds ratio (OR) of PPD.

Findings

According to the fully adjusted model, highest tertile compared to lowest tertile dietary intake of SFAs [OR = 0.01; 95 per cent confidence interval (CI) = 0.00, 0.01, p = 0.001], MUFAs (OR = 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.00, 0.02, p < 0.001), total fats (OR = 0.01; 95 per cent CI =0.00, 0.01, p < 0.001) and cholesterol (OR = 0.06 ; 95 per cent CI = 0.01, 0.08, p < 0.001), thiamine (OR = 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.00, 0.01, p < 0.001), riboflavin (OR = 0.10; 95 per cent CI = 0.02, 0.39, p < 0.001), pyridoxine (OR = 0.03; 95 per cent CI =0.01, 0.32, p < 0.001), folate (OR = 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.00, 0.01, p < 0.001), cobalamine (OR = 0.01; 95 per cent CI = 0.00, 0.01, p < 0.001) , selenium (OR = 0.79 ; 95 per cent CI =1.36, 3.32, p < 0.001), iron (OR =0.68; 95 per cent CI = 0.24, 0.94, p < 0.001) and iodine (OR = 0.36; 95 per cent CI =1.10, 1.38, p < 0.001) had a protective effect on the incidence of PPD. Furthermore, higher intake of vitamin A and beta-cryptoxanthin can increase the incidence of PPD (OR =114.29; 95 per cent CI =17.85, 118.12, p < 0.001) and (OR = 4.85; 95 per cent CI = 1.49, 15.69, p = 0.015), respectively.

Originality/value

PPD may have destructive effects on the relationship between mother and infant. Results of previous studies demonstrated nutrients are required for the synthesis of neurotransmitters and have biochemical role in the nervous system.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

C.H.S. Ruxton and E. Derbyshire

There is a strong interest in the quality of children's diets as this can impact on current and future health. The aim of this paper is to review current and past…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is a strong interest in the quality of children's diets as this can impact on current and future health. The aim of this paper is to review current and past literature on UK children's diets to evaluate the adequacy of nutrient intakes in comparison with recommendations, and to identify population groups that may be at particular risk of nutritional deficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was carried out to locate and summarise up‐to‐date published studies and reports which addressed dietary intakes of UK children, trends overtime and current dietary issues.

Findings

Although UK children's diets appear to have improved in recent years, intakes of several key nutrients remain below dietary recommendations. Iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium and zinc are especially low in some groups, whilst intakes of saturated fat and sugar exceed current targets. Thus, further improvements are needed. In the meantime, parents may consider giving children a daily multi‐vitamin to ensure that micronutrient recommendations are achieved. The lack of child‐specific targets for fibre, long‐chain omega‐3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn3PUFA), vitamin D and fruit and vegetables portions makes it difficult to properly evaluate children's diets for these important dietary components.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should use consistent age ranges and methods of dietary assessment to enable better comparisons. Research is needed to underpin child‐specific dietary guidelines for LCn3PUFA, fibre and vitamin D.

Originality/value

This paper gives a concise, up‐to‐date overview of the current diet quality of UK children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2021

Honglin Dong, Viktorija Asmolovaite, Nareen Marseal and Maryam Mearbon

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent worldwide. This paper aims to investigate the vitamin D status and dietary intake in young university students.

Abstract

Purpose

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent worldwide. This paper aims to investigate the vitamin D status and dietary intake in young university students.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty-one healthy students aged 18–29 years from Coventry University UK were recruited during January-February 2019, including white Caucasians (n = 18), African-Caribbeans (n = 14) and Asians (n = 9). Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were measured and dietary vitamin D intake was determined. Chi-square and simple linear regression were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The plasma 25(OH)D concentrations were (36.0 ± 22.2) nmol/L in all subjects, (46.5 ± 25.3) nmol/L in white Caucasians, (22.6 ± 7.4) nmol/L in African-Caribbeans and (37.4 ± 21.7 nmol/L) in Asians. The majority (85.7%) of African-Caribbeans were vitamin D deficient compared with 22.2% of white Caucasians and 33.3% of Asians (p = 0.001). Overweight/obese subjects showed a significant higher proportion of vitamin D deficiency (65%) than normal weight subjects (28.6%) (p = 0.04). The average dietary vitamin D intake in all subjects was (4.6 ± 3.9) µg/day. Only 12.1% of the subjects met the recommended dietary vitamin D intake of 10 µg/day. Dietary vitamin D intake (p = 0.04) and ethnicity (p = 0.01) were significant predictors of 25(OH)D levels and accounted for 13% and 18.5% of 25(OH)D variance, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

This small-scale study showed an alarmingly high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among subjects from African-Caribbean origin during wintertime. Education programs and campaigns are urgently needed to fight the vitamin D deficiency in this population.

Originality/value

The targeted population were in a critical period of transition from adolescence toward adulthood involving in changes in behaviours and nutrition.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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