Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2009

A.A. Lake, R.M. Hyland, A.J. Rugg‐Gunn, J.C. Mathers and A.J. Adamson

The purpose of this paper is to focus specifically on the benefits of using mixed methods to investigate dietary change from adolescence to adulthood exemplified using the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus specifically on the benefits of using mixed methods to investigate dietary change from adolescence to adulthood exemplified using the findings from the ASH30 longitudinal study. The ASH30 study is a longitudinal dietary survey which provided quantitative evidence of dietary change and investigated factors influencing dietary change from adolescence to adulthood.

Design/methodology/approach

Two three‐day food diaries were collected both in 1980 (aged 11‐12 years) and 2000 (aged 31‐32 years) from the same 198 respondents in North East England. In 2,000 questionnaires were used to collect perceptions of, and attributions for, dietary change and open‐ended responses were analysed using content analysis.

Findings

The use of mixed methods brings added breadth and depth to the research which cannot be achieved by a single discipline or method. Determining what has influenced change in dietary behaviour from adolescence to adulthood is a complex and multifaceted task. Eating habits are influenced by multiple factors throughout the life course. Change in food intake between adolescence and adulthood related to life‐course events and trajectories. The qualitative findings highlighted relevant contextual information such as themes of moral panics, the concept of “convenience” and “fresh” foods.

Practical implications

Adopting mixed method approaches to exploring dietary change should offer a rich perspective from which to base realistic interventions.

Originality/value

Longitudinal dietary surveys present an opportunity to understand the complex process of dietary change throughout the life course in terms both of how diets have changed but also of why they have changed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Kate Parmenter

The majority of studies examining nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviour have been cross‐sectional. In contrast, this longitudinal study aims to examine changes in…

Abstract

The majority of studies examining nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviour have been cross‐sectional. In contrast, this longitudinal study aims to examine changes in individuals’ nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviour over time. Participants were a cohort of mothers who in 1993 completed questionnaires on nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviour and who reported that they intended to change their diets over the next 12 months. This study administered the same questionnaires in 1994, with additional questions to examine further changes in eating habits. Results and implications are discussed.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Bahija Zeidan, Stephanie Ruth Partridge, Kate Balestracci and Margaret Allman-Farinelli

Young adults frequently engage in sub-optimal dietary behaviours, such as inadequate intakes of fruits and vegetables and excessive consumption of take-out meals…

Abstract

Purpose

Young adults frequently engage in sub-optimal dietary behaviours, such as inadequate intakes of fruits and vegetables and excessive consumption of take-out meals. Theory-based interventions are suggested to promote dietary change. The transtheoretical model is an example that stages an individual’s readiness to change behaviours as precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance, and includes a series of processes that help people move between stages. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether self-reported usual dietary intakes of fruits and vegetables and take-out foods differ by reported stage-of-change.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data from 250 overweight young adults, aged 18-35 years, who enrolled in a lifestyle intervention to prevent weight gain are analysed. Participant’s stage-of-change for increasing fruit and vegetable intakes and reducing take-out foods is determined using staging algorithms. This is compared with self-reported dietary intakes over the past month using a food frequency questionnaire. Differences in intakes and variety by stage-of-change are compared for fruits, vegetables and take-out foods.

Findings

Take-out foods differed between stages (p < 0.0001), with lower weekly intakes in action (309 g) and maintenance (316 g) compared with preparation (573 g). Daily fruit intakes and variety scores varied by stage-of-change (p < 0.0001), being highest for action and maintenance (261 g and 263 g, respectively, and variety scores of 1 and 2) compared with precontemplation, contemplation and preparation (all = 100 g and 0 for variety). Daily vegetable consumption and variety scores differed by stage (p = 0.009 and p = 0.025, respectively) being highest for action/maintenance (204 g and 2 for variety) versus precontemplation and preparation (<110 g daily and Variety 1).

Practical implications

The finding of no differences in intakes between precontemplation, contemplation or preparation stages implies that the adoption of the dietary behaviours is not a continuum but a move from pre-action to actioning the target intakes. This means that for planning health promotion and dietary counselling, assigning people to the three different pre-action stages may be unnecessary.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the congruence of self-reported readiness to change behaviour with dietary intakes of take-out foods as well as variety of fruit and vegetables in overweight young adults.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Jemma Orr and Alison McCamley

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Eatwell for Life (EWL) programme, with a particular focus on longer term effectiveness in terms of dietary

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Eatwell for Life (EWL) programme, with a particular focus on longer term effectiveness in terms of dietary behaviour and the wider impact. EWL is a six-week community-based dietary intervention which aims to increase nutritional knowledge, cooking confidence and provide the necessary skills to support behavioural change in relation to eating a balanced diet. There have been many evaluations of community-based dietary interventions, but most focus on brief measures and changes examined at the end of each course.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method evaluation was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire, focus groups and semi-structured telephone interviews. A follow-up evaluation was conducted at 3, 6 and 12 months with a purposive sample of EWL participants.

Findings

A total of 66 participants completed both pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. A total of 22 participants took part in the qualitative follow-up evaluation. The mixed method evaluation demonstrates improvements in participants’ fruit and vegetable consumption and a reduction in participants’ sugar consumption. Qualitative data highlight key themes such as “cooking from basic ingredients”, “knowledge of key healthy eating messages”, “changes in eating, cooking and shopping habits” and “wider influences on family and friends’ diets”.

Originality/value

This paper is useful to public health nutritionists and other practitioners delivering community-based dietary and cooking skills programmes and those commissioning such provision. It contributes to existing evidence of sustained change over time targeting those in areas of high deprivation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Lih-Juan ChanLin, Kung-Chi Chan and Chiao-Ru Wang

This study aims to investigate whether epistemological assessment is a suitable approach to evaluate students’ learning of dietary knowledge via the use of an augmented…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether epistemological assessment is a suitable approach to evaluate students’ learning of dietary knowledge via the use of an augmented reality (AR) information system. Students’ perceived dietary knowledge was compared before and after learning with the AR system. Two major questions were addressed: Did students improve their understanding of dietary knowledge after the use of AR information system? Did students gain more appropriate understanding of dietary knowledge after the use of AR information system?

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach was used in the study. The mobile AR system was used among 65 volunteered non-nutrition-major college students recruited in campus. For promoting epistemological development of personal dietary knowledge, students practiced with life experiences to access daily dietary information. Pre- and post-tests of students’ understanding of dietary knowledge were compared. Interviews with 20 students were used for gathering in-depth research data to analyse students’ epistemological understanding of dietary knowledge.

Findings

The epistemological assessment indicated an improvement in learning after the use of the AR system. Students gradually gained awareness of dietary knowledge and changed their perceptions of their dietary behaviours. Epistemological approaches to the analysis of students’ conceptual change in dietary knowledge revealed a significant increase in the mean nutritional concepts (p < 0.01) and a decrease in their mean misconceptions (p < 0.001) after learning via the mobile nutrition monitoring system. Learning assessment of 65 students also indicated a significant increase from the post-test after learning with the system (p < 0.0001).

Research limitations/implications

This study might have its limitations, as it only assessed learning using a pretest-posttest design for a specific learning context over a short period of learning time. The use of interviews based on the epistemological approach might have its limitations in the interpretations of the phenomenon. Future implementations can also be extended to different populations to promote self-monitoring dietary behaviours.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will contribute to the application of AR in learning about dietary knowledge. The research involving in-depth observation of students’ learning relevant to personal nutritional information needs via mobile AR might provide potential contributions to dietitian professionals and health education.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Andrea Begley, Danielle Gallegos and Helen Vidgen

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review of the literature was used to identify and assess the quality and effectiveness of Australian single-strategy CSIs and multi-strategy programmes that included cooking for independent healthy people older than 16 years from 1992 to 2015.

Findings

There were only 15 interventions (n=15) identified for review and included CSIs as single strategies (n=8) or as part of multi-strategy programmes (n=7) over 23 years. The majority of the interventions were rated as weak in quality (66 per cent) due to their study design, lack of control groups, lack of validated evaluation measures and small sample sizes. Just over half (53 per cent) of the CSIs reviewed described some measurement related to improved dietary behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

There is inconclusive evidence that CSIs are effective in changing dietary behaviours in Australia. However, they are valued by policymakers and practitioners and used in public health nutrition programmes, particularly for indigenous groups.

Originality/value

This is the first time that CSIs have been reviewed in an Australian context and they provide evidence of the critical need to improve the quality CSIs to positively influence dietary behaviour change in Australia.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Liz Logie‐MacIver, Maria Piacentini and Douglas Eadie

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of qualitative approaches to add depth and insight to understanding concerning the issues involved when consumers try to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of qualitative approaches to add depth and insight to understanding concerning the issues involved when consumers try to make changes in their behaviour. The context of this study is people trying to make and sustain changes to their dietary behaviour. Taking Prochaska and Di Clemente's Stages of Change model as the starting point, this paper marks a departure from other work in the behavioural change area in so far as a qualitative approach is adopted rather than a quantitative perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was longitudinal in design and the data presented concern groups of people who were categorized as belonging to stages of change and who followed a similar stage of change pattern over a period of 18 months (according to the Stage of Change algorithm described by Curry et al.).

Findings

By examining peoples' behaviour changes in depth, the similarities and differences in their attitudes and motivations are revealed in terms of their dietary behaviour change and maintenance of change. This provides a more refined understanding of how people make changes and maintain them over time.

Research limitations/implications

While focusing only on a small number of people, the weaknesses of the Stages of Change model is demonstrated and how qualitative research approaches can be used to add depth and meaning to quantitative methodologies popular in the social marketing domain.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the Stages of Change model has value in categorizing people into stages of change and measuring these changes over time but is limited in its ability to develop understanding of the lived experience of trying to change behaviour.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Qian Sun, Xiaoyun Li and Dil Bahadur Rahut

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of urbanicity on rural–urban migrants' dietary diversity and nutrition intake and whether its effect differs across…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of urbanicity on rural–urban migrants' dietary diversity and nutrition intake and whether its effect differs across various urban environments of migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the individual- and time-invariant fixed effects (two-way FE) model and five-year panel data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this paper estimates a linear and nonlinear relationship between urbanicity and nutrition. The paper also explores the spatial heterogeneity between rural–urban migrants and rural–suburban migrants. Dietary diversity, total energy intake and the shares of energy obtained from protein and fat, respectively, are used to measure rural–urban migrants' nutrition on both quality and quantity aspects.

Findings

The study shows that rural–urban migrants have experienced access to more diverse, convenient and prepared foods, and the food variety consumed is positively associated with community urbanicity. Energy intake is positively and significantly affected by community urbanicity, and it also varies with per capita household income. The obvious inverse U-shaped relationship reveals that improving community urbanicity promotes an increase in the shares of energy obtained from protein and fat at a decreasing rate, until reaching the urbanicity index threshold of 66.69 and 54.26, respectively.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the nutritional status of rural–urban migrants, an important pillar for China's development, which is often neglected in the research. It examines the urbanicity and the nutrition of migrants in China, which provides a new perspective to understand the dietary and nutritional intake among migrants in the economic and social development. Moreover, the urbanicity index performs better at measuring urban feathers rather than the traditional rural/urban dichotomous classification.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Paul Sparks, Monique M. Raats, Moira A. Geekie, Richard Shepherd and Claire Dale

Outlines research on the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded project Communication strategies for the Promotion of Dietary Change. With a view to general…

Abstract

Outlines research on the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded project Communication strategies for the Promotion of Dietary Change. With a view to general dietary recommendations and to Health of the Nation targets, the focus of this three‐year project is the promotion of dietary change through information provision. A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the Institute of Food Research, Reading, is conducting the research, drawing on a number of different theoretical perspectives and methodological procedures. Pays special emphasis to the issue of fat consumption, summarizes the practical role of the theory of planned behaviour, the elaboration‐likelihood model and unrealistic optimism research, and outlines the development of a novel food and drink diary. Advocates a multidisciplinary, integrative approach to information‐based health promotion efforts.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Lisa Quintiliani, Signe Poulsen and Glorian Sorensen

There is a clear link between dietary behavior and a range of chronic diseases, and overweight and obesity constitute an indirect risk in relation to these diseases. The…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a clear link between dietary behavior and a range of chronic diseases, and overweight and obesity constitute an indirect risk in relation to these diseases. The worksite is a central venue for influencing dietary behavior. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of workplace influences on workers' dietary patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the evidence of the effectiveness of dietary health promotion, and provides a brief overview of appropriate theoretical frameworks to guide intervention design and evaluation. The findings are illustrated through research examples.

Findings

Through case studies and published research, it is found that workplace dietary interventions are generally effective, especially fruit and vegetable interventions. There is less consistent evidence on the long‐term effectiveness of workplace weight management interventions, underscoring the need for further research in this area. This paper also reports evidence that changes in the work environment, including through health and safety programs, may contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of workplace health promotion, including dietary interventions. Organizational factors such as work schedule may also influence dietary patterns. The social ecological model, the social contextual model and political process approach are presented as exemplar conceptual models that may be useful when designing or assessing the effects of workplace health promotion.

Originality/value

The paper shows that using the worksite as a setting for influencing health by influencing dietary patterns holds considerable promise and may be instrumental in reducing workers' risk of developing chronic diseases.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000