Search results

1 – 10 of 38
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Dessy Kurnia Sari, Dick Mizerski and Fang Liu

This paper aims to investigate the motivations behind Muslim consumers’ boycotting of foreign products. The act of boycotting foreign products has become increasingly common among…

2571

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the motivations behind Muslim consumers’ boycotting of foreign products. The act of boycotting foreign products has become increasingly common among Muslim consumers. Products from different countries-of-origin are their boycott targets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted semi-structured in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions for data collection. A total of 36 Indonesian subjects participated in the study, representing the “university student” and “non-university student” samples. Leximancer, a qualitative analytical tool, was used to identify important motivations for boycotting behaviour among Muslim consumers.

Findings

Contrary to previous findings, this study found that Muslim consumers do not boycott solely for religious reasons. For example, most participants reported they boycotted Chinese products because they would like to protect their local products, along with the religious-based motivation of rejecting uncertainty about the halal certification of the products. Thus, the motivations identified from this study were not related exclusively to religion.

Practical implications

The present study offers new insights into the religious and secular motivations of Muslim consumers’ boycotts. Foreign products should adopt localised strategies such as repeatedly reminding consumers of the true halal nature of their products and their contribution to the local people.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the recognition of new insights into Muslim motivation to boycott product. The results develop important concepts surrounding the issue of boycotting foreign products. A concept map has been produced to offer a more comprehensive picture of Muslim’s boycotting behaviour.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Thomas Kobinah, Dick Mizerski and Katherine Mizerski

Commercial rumour can have a very negative impact on companies and products. As soon as a negative rumour begins to spread, sales often fall drastically. The major battle is not…

Abstract

Commercial rumour can have a very negative impact on companies and products. As soon as a negative rumour begins to spread, sales often fall drastically. The major battle is not only to recover sales but how to recover consumer confidence before buyers eliminate the company’s brands from their evoked set. The literature on commercial rumour implicitly assumes that consumers will react to commercial rumours in a homogenous manner. However, most marketing scholars involved in studying cultural effects suggest that the culture of the buyer will influence their reaction specifically through their acceptance/rejection of the source attempting to refute the rumour. Therefore, any attempt to address commercial rumour without regard to the buyers’ cultural backgrounds may not be effective. An experiment was developed to test the effect of cultural background on choice of spokesperson to refute commercial rumours. The results of this experiment show that consumers from Eastern and Western cultural backgrounds respond in a different manner to spokespersons addressing commercial rumours. Their cultural backgrounds and values appear to influence their belief about the veracity of the source responding to the commercial rumours and their message. It is recommended that marketing personnel consider consumers’ and buyers’ core values when developing strategies for and selecting sources for controlling commercial rumours.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Nazlida Muhamad, Vai Shiem Leong and Dick Mizerski

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and…

2090

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights on the influence of Muslim consumers’ knowledge on products subjected to contemporary fatwa ruling and their subsequent cognitive and behavioural responses.

Design/methodology/approach

MANOVA and MANCOVA were used to examine the influence of religious orientation on young Malaysian Muslims’ product knowledge, and the extent of religious orientation and gender on Muslim consumers’ attitude and behaviour towards three contemporary fatwa rulings of products.

Findings

Respondents’ religious orientation differentiates their knowledge on fatwa prohibition ruling of selected brand and behaviours. Consumers’ religious orientation and gender explain consumers’ behavioural responses to variables of the Theory of Planned Behaviour for three behaviours. Evidence suggests that ruling types affects (conditional and unconditional) consumers’ responses.

Research limitations/implications

Greater insights are provided on Muslims’ motivation to search information of controversial products, and their subsequent perception and behavioural reactions to controversial products. Findings are limited to the Malaysian Muslim consumers.

Practical implications

The fact that contemporary fatwa reached young Muslim generations indicates that managers have to be wary of fatwa to predict Muslim consumers’ marketplace behaviours.

Social implications

A significant number of young Malaysian Muslims are keeping abreast with contemporary fatwa. This suggests that they received an early and substantial exposure to Islamic way of life through their socialisation.

Originality/value

This study offer insights into the understandings of the young Muslim generation regarding contemporary fatwa on products, and revealed significant findings in relation to consumer product knowledge and religious influences on consumer behaviour.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Nazlida Muhamad Hashim and Dick Mizerski

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of fatwa and the dissemination of fatwa rulings among Muslim consumers using two studies. Results from these studies show that…

2149

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of fatwa and the dissemination of fatwa rulings among Muslim consumers using two studies. Results from these studies show that contemporary fatwa often extend beyond Muslims' religious beliefs and practices. By advising Muslims on the brands and product categories that are permissible and prohibited for consumption, fatwa rulings can cause boycotts and bans of products or brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analyses are performed in Study 1 to explore the types of fatwa rulings that are declared by the Malaysian fatwa authorities. In Study 2, a survey instrument is used to collect responses from Muslims regarding their sources of fatwa ruling for two products, their religious motivation and gender. Cluster analysis and an independent χ2‐test are used to test the study's predictions.

Findings

Fatwa rulings in the area of social issues and economics have a known tendency to affect Muslim consumers' marketplace behavior. Muslim consumers tend to acquire information on more controversial fatwa rulings through less formal sources, compared to less controversial fatwa rulings. Several clusters of Muslim consumers were found to have their sources of fatwa associated with the product category, gender of respondent, and religious orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to Malaysian Muslim University students and Malaysia's fatwa system. This use of young Malaysian Muslims probably restricts the findings to this cohort, rather than the general population of Malaysian Muslims.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights into how fatwa rulings affect marketplace behaviors and how information sources are accessed and fatwa information is disseminated among Muslim consumers. The findings lead to suggestions on how marketers can manage fatwa rulings concerning their products.

Originality/value

The paper provides an understanding of the nature and types of fatwa rulings circulating in the Muslim world, and identifies factors related to Muslims' knowledge of fatwa rulings.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Fang Liu, Jianyao Li, Dick Mizerski and Huangting Soh

This study aims to examine the effects of three self‐congruity constructs: the brand's personality congruity (BPC), the brand's user imagery congruity and the brand's usage…

48167

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of three self‐congruity constructs: the brand's personality congruity (BPC), the brand's user imagery congruity and the brand's usage imagery congruity, in consumers' attitude and brand loyalty toward two luxury fashion brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of Australian consumers, this study examines two luxury fashion brands (CK and Chanel) from two product categories, watches and sunglasses. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study finds that user and usage imagery congruity are stronger predictors for brand attitude and brand loyalty than BPC in the context of the luxury fashion brands tested. Both user and usage imagery congruity have significant effects in brand attitude and brand loyalty in most analyses. This study finds no significant effect of BPC in either brand attitude or brand loyalty for the two brands tested.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should include more populations, product categories and more brands in each category.

Practical implications

Symbolic benefits are key motivations behind luxury brand purchases. Symbolic benefits are from non‐product‐related attributes like imagery. One important implication of the study is that user and usage imagery are more important to build than attempts to develop a brand's personality. Because most luxury brands market in multiple product categories, attention should be paid to the core perceptions of user and usage imagery for the brand when designing communication strategies for different categories.

Originality/value

This study provides the first evidence that these self‐congruity concepts may represent different imageries that lead to different effects in brand attitude and brand loyalty. Findings from this study add to the understanding of the consumption of luxury brands.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Nazlida Muhamad and Dick Mizerski

There is limited conceptual and theoretical knowledge among marketers and practitioners regarding the measurement of religious influences in consumer market‐place behaviours. The…

3150

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited conceptual and theoretical knowledge among marketers and practitioners regarding the measurement of religious influences in consumer market‐place behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to review religious factors that appear to influence buyer and consumer behaviour in the light of findings from marketing and religious psychology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises academic databases to search for marketing and religious psychology papers that deal with influences of religion and constructs that have been suggested to mediate them. Findings from religious psychology are utilised as the backbone for understanding religious influence. The paper also compares and groups terminologies and concepts used in marketing studies, suggesting a holistic view of religion and factors that may mediate religious influences on consumers' market‐place behaviours.

Findings

Five factors of religious influence have been identified. These are commitment, motivation, affiliation, knowledge about a religion and awareness of the social consequences of following a religion. The characteristics, importance and applications of these factors are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper applies knowledge from the area of religious psychology to offer a holistic view in understanding factors that tend to mediate religious influences on consumer behaviours.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Nathalie Collins, Hanna Gläbe, Dick Mizerski and Jamie Murphy

Industry publications abound with tips on how to create and nurture customer evangelism. Scholarly publications note the effects of evangelism to firms. Consultants promote…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry publications abound with tips on how to create and nurture customer evangelism. Scholarly publications note the effects of evangelism to firms. Consultants promote evangelism creation as part of their skill set. Yet the existence customer evangelism and its effects remain unsupported by empirical evidence. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively explore customer evangelism.

Methodology/approach

This paper takes one of the first steps towards empirical analysis of customer evangelism by using a formative composite latent variable model to identify customer evangelists from a survey population. The authors then compare customer evangelists against non-customer evangelists on key characteristics, as per the claims in the qualitative literature, to verify the accuracy of the selection model.

Findings

The analysis demonstrates that key claims in the qualitative literature in regard to customer evangelists are supported by quantitative data in this study, namely that customer evangelists are focused on authenticity, cultishness and sharing knowledge, and have a deep emotional and spiritual connection to the brand. They also have higher intentions to purchase the product in future than do non-customer evangelists. However, other claims in the qualitative literature – such as that customer evangelists are more socially oriented, knowledge-seeking, experientially oriented or idealistic than are non-customer evangelists – are not supported by the data in this study, or are inconclusive.

Originality/value of paper

This study is one of the first to attempt to empirically identify customer evangelists, and is part of a movement to study consumer religiosity in an empirical context. This study paves the way for further empirical research into customer evangelism, consumer religiosity and consumer collectivism.

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Jianyao Li, Dick Mizerski, Alvin Lee and Fang Liu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of attitude towards behavior, subject norm and perceived behavioral control (PBC) on a Chinese subject's evaluation of a…

5218

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of attitude towards behavior, subject norm and perceived behavioral control (PBC) on a Chinese subject's evaluation of a tertiary education program.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a 3 (country‐of‐origin) by 2 (location) between‐group factorial design. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) is used as a framework to understand the intentions of the Chinese subjects concerning their enrollment in an offshore program.

Findings

Results show that a subject's attitude towards behavior, subject norm and PBC had a significantly positive relationship with the subjects' enrollment intentions irrespective of the country‐of‐origin (COO) of an education program. However, results also indicate that the significance of the three components on enrollment intention is contingent on which country the offshore program is from.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can help foreign education institutions develop a good understanding of the education market in China.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that have adopted the TPB, the widely used psychology theory, in the Chinese context.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Brand Meaning Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-932-5

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

1606

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

You are the son or daughter of a well‐heeled family and studying at an exclusive and expensive university. Your affluence is such that your watch and sunglasses are more likely to be branded with the Calvin Klein or Chanel name than with that of a cheaper, downmarket product. But why do people choose such brands – apart from the fact they can afford them – at a time when brands are becoming less and less different in terms of product attributes? How can marketers of luxury goods develop or enhance brand images via non‐product attributes? It's a challenge which is becoming increasingly important for marketing any brand, luxury or not.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

1 – 10 of 38