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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Robert Bowen

The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the diaspora effect on food tourism. Focussing on the nexus of diaspora marketing, entrepreneurship and food tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the diaspora effect on food tourism. Focussing on the nexus of diaspora marketing, entrepreneurship and food tourism, this paper seeks to explore opportunities for food and drink small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to engage in food tourism activities through diaspora marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

As an investigation of an under-researched concept, this research uses mixed methods to develop a deeper understanding of diaspora effects on food tourism. This includes an online survey of 169 food producers, with 37 follow-up interviews. Research was conducted with food producing SMEs in Wales and Brittany, two culturally and geographically similar places, where both the food and drink and tourism industries are significant parts of the local economy.

Findings

Two avenues for diaspora tourism are apparent, either through engaging with diaspora networks, such as expatriate networks located outside the country of origin, or through the reverse diaspora effect, of visitors experiencing products and then seeking to purchase them once returned to their countries. Both approaches depend on the ability for the food producer to sell their products to international buyers, as well as ensuring that international buyers had sufficient awareness of the products, which also links to a positive reputation for food.

Originality/value

The paper aims to take a novel approach to the impact of diasporas on food tourism by considering the entrepreneurial activity of businesses in developing opportunities for food tourism through diaspora marketing. Distinctions are made from existing research by studying diaspora tourism from the business perspective.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Iddrisu Mohammed, Alexander Preko, Azizbek Allaberganov and Tachie-Eyiah Yaw Thomas

The literature has acknowledged the importance of diaspora studies because of the influx of funds into the local economy, including the tourism and hospitality sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature has acknowledged the importance of diaspora studies because of the influx of funds into the local economy, including the tourism and hospitality sector. However, little empirical research appears to be known about the subject matter, principally within the developing country perspective. This study aims to respond to research calls by investigating the impact of diasporic cultural heritage, family heritage on travel preference of West African Indian migrant visitors to their homeland.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is guided by the theory of acculturation. A quantitative data were gathered from a sample of 312 diasporas, and the regression analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study finds that cultural heritage and family heritage have positive and significant impact on travel preference of migrant visitors to their homeland. Further analysis of the independent sample t-test reveals a significant difference between Indian Ghanaians and Ghanaian Indians in their thought of cultural heritage. However, no significant differences were found in the Indian Ghanaian and Ghanaian Indian’s family heritage and travel preference to their homeland.

Research limitations/implications

This study is destination-specific of Indian migrant visitors. The application of the study’s outcome to other diaspora would demand a larger sample size for generalization to be made. The study offers compelling insights on cultural heritage, family heritage and travel preference to marketing a diaspora tourism site.

Originality/value

The study expands the application of the theory of acculturation within the diaspora literature and establishes that integration and separation strategies of the theory explain the positive interests of the migrant visitors’ traveling preference to their homeland.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Dana M. Moss

Mobilization by diaspora activists against illiberalism in their country of origin and by immigrants for equality in their country of settlement has received widespread…

Abstract

Mobilization by diaspora activists against illiberalism in their country of origin and by immigrants for equality in their country of settlement has received widespread attention in political science and sociology, respectively. However, because extant studies treat these mobilizations as distinct types, little is known about the relationship between diaspora and immigrant mobilization. This chapter addresses this theoretical gap using 167 interviews with Syrian and Yemeni activists in the United States and Britain. The findings demonstrate how Syrian and Yemeni diaspora mobilization in support of the 2011 Arab Spring revolutions facilitated their visibility and voice as immigrants. Syrians built an organizational field with the capacity to contest host-country discrimination and local extremism; Yemenis instituted protests and brokerage that shaped the context of reception for home-country elites and challenged intragroup inequality. At the same time, economic disparities between national groups shaped their capacities to diversify tactics and sustain efforts over time. My chief claim is that diaspora mobilization facilitates immigrant voice and visibility but is mitigated in important ways by group-wise resources. The chapter concludes by emphasizing the importance of voice and visibility among marginalized groups subjected to intersecting repressions.

Details

The Politics of Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-363-0

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Masud Chand

Diasporas can play a vital role in enhancing a country's international competitiveness. They can act as catalysts to enhance human capital development in their country of…

Abstract

Diasporas can play a vital role in enhancing a country's international competitiveness. They can act as catalysts to enhance human capital development in their country of origin (COO), use their transnational social networks in both the COO and country of residence (COR) as conduits for trade and investment, introduce COO culture and products in the COR, enhance the COO's soft power and use their social networks to favourably affect the COO effect. In this paper, we examine the vital roles that modern diasporas play, as well as the issues that have led to their increasing importance. These issues are illustrated by looking at the experiences of two of the largest modern diasporas, the Chinese and Indian diasporas. The paper concludes by examining some of the emerging issues for diasporas in the fast changing current global environment, and discusses some of their implications for the diasporas themselves, their COOs and their CORs.

Details

The Past, Present and Future of International Business & Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-085-9

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2017

Maria Elo

To understand how diaspora entrepreneurship evolves and becomes a small-scale emerging market multinational and how this process is enabled.

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how diaspora entrepreneurship evolves and becomes a small-scale emerging market multinational and how this process is enabled.

Methodology/approach

Case study and ethnographic methods were employed.

Findings

Diaspora entrepreneurs can act as change agents who create and penetrate markets under difficult conditions. They are less influenced by institutional voids in home and host countries when they have strong international diaspora networks that enable a connection to resources, overcoming such voids. Diaspora entrepreneurs may be resource-embedded socially in a way that creates superior competitive advantages and reduces liabilities of foreignness and of outsidership.

Research limitations/implications

Diaspora entrepreneurship incorporates invisible and idiographic potential, such as social capital and knowledge networks. These are not available for other non-incumbent companies (e.g., foreign entrants) and are difficult to research due to access barriers.

Practical implications

Perception and active management of network-based resources is important for opportunity and business development. Management in a transition economy context requires holistic views, deep understanding, and working linkages across markets.

Social implications

Transgenerational entrepreneurship and ethnic traditions are important for the community. Entrepreneurship provides continuity and identity, such as using ethnic language, as well as prosperity and solidarity that are important for supporting cultural identity.

Originality/value

This study connects diaspora entrepreneurship in Central Asia and emerging market multinationals that are small and medium-sized enterprises. Both are underexplored domains, but may share particular institutional settings. Growth and internationalization into a multinational enterprise with an emerging market origin, especially by women entrepreneurs, are rarely studied. This case illustrates the need to capture the processual dynamics, resources, and actor networks, including sociocultural and spatiotemporal factors for better contextualization.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Eva Karayianni, Elias Hadjielias and Loukas Glyptis

The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which family ties influence the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the way in which family ties influence the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were carried out with 15 Cypriot family business owners hosted in various countries. The paper draws on social capital theory and uses an abductive analytical approach.

Findings

The findings of this paper illustrate that family ties coming from the family across borders play a significant role for diaspora family business owners’ entrepreneurial preparedness. Hidden values deriving from the interpersonal relationships within the family across borders drive the diaspora family business owners to learn upon self-reflection and become entrepreneurially prepared, led by both urgency and esteem.

Practical implications

This study provides practical implications for the entrepreneurial preparedness of diaspora family business owners and those who wish to become family business owners in a diaspora context.

Originality/value

This study contributes theoretically through the conceptualization of “family across borders social capital” and “diaspora entrepreneurial preparedness”. It also contributes empirically to the fields of diaspora family business, entrepreneurial learning and diaspora entrepreneurship through new knowledge regarding the role of family across borders social capital in the entrepreneurial preparedness of the diaspora family business owner.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Claudel Mombeuil, Anestis K. Fotiadis and Withz Aimable

While diaspora entrepreneurs remain important sources of capital and innovation, many developing countries are facing serious challenges to tap into these sources because…

Abstract

Purpose

While diaspora entrepreneurs remain important sources of capital and innovation, many developing countries are facing serious challenges to tap into these sources because of their weak institutional settings and the endemic and systemic corruption. To this end, this study explores how institutional reforms and control of corruption can influence diaspora entrepreneurship. This study also seeks to provide perspectives on how diaspora entrepreneurs can influence institutional reforms and market policies.

Design/methodology/approach

To meet these objectives, qualitative and interpretive research approaches were employed.

Findings

Using responses collected from Haitian diaspora entrepreneurs living in the USA, this paper highlights different attributes of institutional reforms and control of corruption that can influence diaspora entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

Based on these insights, this paper argues that Haitian diaspora entrepreneurs need to play a proactive role as policy entrepreneurs by supporting competent and well-intention political leaders to gain office and by joining forces with local actors to advocate for institutional reforms, market reforms and control of corruption in order to be able to exploit market opportunities. In this respect, further perspectives for diaspora entrepreneurship, limitations and consideration for future research are highlighted.

Originality/value

By collecting insights on institutional reform and diaspora entrepreneurship from diaspora entrepreneurs, this paper makes important contribution to the entrepreneurship literature.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Ximeng Chen

The concept of diaspora philanthropy contains the following two components: diasporas, who are individuals who live outside of their homelands but maintain a sense of…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of diaspora philanthropy contains the following two components: diasporas, who are individuals who live outside of their homelands but maintain a sense of identity with their home countries, and charitable giving provided by these diasporas to causes related to their hometowns. Often diaspora philanthropy happens through intermediary organizations such as hometown associations, internet-based philanthropic platforms and faith-based groups. Little research explores immigrant-owned small businesses as intermediary organizations for diaspora philanthropy. In the literature of social entrepreneurship, the theory of opportunity recognition provides insights on how do businesses identify opportunities for fulfilling social missions. However, it is uncertain whether this major theory can be applied to a specific context such as immigrant-owned small businesses. In this research, I aim to understand immigrant-owned small businesses' participation in social entrepreneurship through diaspora philanthropy, especially in responding to natural disasters. Specifically, three research questions were proposed: What role do small businesses play? What mechanisms do they use to partake in diaspora philanthropy? Moreover, what motivates them to participate?

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses an in-depth case study that focuses on a specific diaspora philanthropy behavior in responding to a natural disaster in the diaspora's hometown. The subject of this work is a small business owned by an immigrant in New York City, the US. To collect data on this case, the author utilized a mixed-methods design, which involves two types of qualitative data: document analysis and interview. Giving the purpose of this study, the author used thematic coding for both newspaper article data and interview data following a deductive approach.

Findings

The result shows that small businesses have an inherent advantage in building close interpersonal relationships with their customers and serve as the connector between their customers and larger philanthropic organizations. Because of their limitations on resources, small businesses collaborate with larger nonprofit organizations to do complicated philanthropic work for improved capacity. When diaspora philanthropy happens due to natural disasters in homelands, diasporas experience some level of guilt since they are not there with the people of their homeland in solidarity facing the difficulties. This guilt, which is related to cultural influences, is one of the motivations that make diasporas give to their homelands. The findings also show that the opportunity recognition theory fits well into explaining the altruistic behaviors of small businesses owned by immigrants.

Originality/value

A lot remains unknown about immigrant-owned small businesses, including their altruistic behaviors and participation in social entrepreneurship. This research expands the current knowledge on diaspora philanthropy by identifying the roles of small businesses, the mechanisms used by small businesses and the motivations of giving during natural disasters. This research also validates the opportunity recognition theory of social entrepreneurship in a specific context.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Andrei Panibratov and Liana Rysakova

The aim of this study is to identify the distinctive features of the diaspora phenomenon through the aggregation and systematization of the business and management…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify the distinctive features of the diaspora phenomenon through the aggregation and systematization of the business and management literature and propose a framework to apply in the future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The two-step research was based on a combination of bibliometric analysis and a manual in-depth study of academic articles. Overall, 421 academic papers in management and business journals until 2019 year were analyzed.

Findings

The authors provide a new holistic insight on the role of national diasporas for business outcomes via the analysis and systematization of the extant diaspora research. They revealed four definition approaches and five main clusters in the diaspora literature that have three main directions of research as international marketing with the tourism management focus, the IB research and diaspora entrepreneurship studies. The authors cover these main research streams and their contribution to the development of a topic.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework including definition approaches and suggestions on the further research can serve as a foundation for future studies to investigate the diaspora phenomenon. The findings also are of practical value for firms whose attention is paid to the effective management.

Originality/value

To bring more clarity to the existing and future development of diaspora research, this paper improves the structuring of the overall diaspora literature through clarification of the existing definitions of diaspora, provision of the criteria qualifying someone to be identified as a member of a diaspora, as well as an analysis and systematization of existing diaspora research streams and suggestions for future research directions.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Noraini Abu Talib, Saudah Sofian, Noor Azmi Mohamad, Aslan Amat Senin, Hamdan Abd Kadir, Halimah Mohd Yusof and Ibn‐e‐ Hassan

A large number of East Asian economies have benefited from the diaspora employed in the large North American and European clusters. The diaspora acquired valuable skills…

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Abstract

Purpose

A large number of East Asian economies have benefited from the diaspora employed in the large North American and European clusters. The diaspora acquired valuable skills, developed contacts and financial wealth. Much has been written about the professional and personal obstacles of brain circulation but scant work has been done to highlight the structural factors influencing brain circulation as well as diaspora strategies in the Malaysian context. This article aims to review the brain circulation theory and pertinent literature on Malaysian clusters and to highlight the structural factors inhibiting diaspora and flow of talent to Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a discussion paper on the issues surrounding diaspora strategies.

Findings

On the basis of the review of successful diaspora of China, India, Korea and Taiwan, cluster organizations should take independent initiatives to contact the diaspora networks abroad in order to leverage their skills, contacts and finances through alumni and virtual networks.

Practical implication

Successful diaspora programs in China, Taiwan and India do not guarantee that imitation of those programs will result in success elsewhere.

Originality/value

The article reviews the pertinent literature and highlights the structural factors inhibiting diaspora and flow of talent to Malaysia.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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