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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Dianne L. Hoff, Nancy Yoder and Peter S. Hoff

George Counts' classic 1932 speech asks, “Dare the school build a new social order?” This article proposes examining whether emerging school leaders are prepared to face…

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1444

Abstract

Purpose

George Counts' classic 1932 speech asks, “Dare the school build a new social order?” This article proposes examining whether emerging school leaders are prepared to face this challenge and embrace the society‐building responsibility at the core of public schooling. It aims to focus especially on students from homogeneous backgrounds, their capacity to address issues of diversity, and the extent to which their educational leadership program has prepared them to champion social justice within schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at emerging leaders in three master's level cohort programs in educational leadership at a state university in New England. It incorporates survey data, interviews, and document analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to organize and summarize the data. Open‐ended questions and interviews were transcribed and coded, and program documents examined to identify overall purposes of educational leadership and evidence of diversity awareness.

Findings

Findings indicate these educational leaders are not adequately prepared to lead public schools toward a greater understanding of diversity or to help change the social order. They claim little responsibility for promoting social justice, especially when social change may challenge local norms. Responses indicate their perspective is not broad enough to understand fully the social responsibility Counts advocated.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to graduate students in New England, most of whom experience little diversity within their communities.

Practical implications

The study concludes with suggestions for educational leadership programs.

Originality/value

This study reveals the difficulties in preparing educational leaders to address the complexities of a diverse society – difficulties arising both from their limited personal experience and from voids in their educational leadership program.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Dianne L. Hoff and Sidney N. Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to present research exploring the pervasiveness and causes of cyberbullying, the psychological impact on students, and the responses to…

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49184

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research exploring the pervasiveness and causes of cyberbullying, the psychological impact on students, and the responses to cyberbullying from students and administrators. The goal is to give school leaders a greater understanding of this phenomenon and suggest steps to deal with this challenging issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are collected from 351 students using a survey, which contains limited choice, scaled response, and open‐ended questions. This qualitative/quantitative design enables collection of data from a large population along with rich qualitative data that expand and explain students' experiences.

Findings

The paper reveals that cyberbullying emerges most commonly from relationship problems (break‐ups, envy, intolerance, and ganging up); victims experience powerfully negative effects (especially on their social well‐being); and the reactive behavior from schools and students is generally inappropriate, absent, or ineffective.

Research limitations/implications

This is self‐reported data collected from a group of students in one institution, who are asked to recall instances from their pre‐college experience. Additional research on from a variety of age groups and cross‐culturally would add another layer of understanding about cyberbullying among teens.

Practical implications

Technological advances have created new challenges for schools in keeping students safe. This paper has implications for educational policy and practice, including steps school leaders can take to curtail cyberbullying.

Originality/value

This paper builds on a small body of research on cyberbullying and focuses on underlying causes, categories of psychological effects, and specific remedies.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

A. Ross Thomas

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521

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Emily Bouck and Rajiv Satsangi

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation…

Abstract

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation and achievement of students with disabilities in mathematics in general and in inclusive mathematics settings in particular. In this chapter, assistive technology to academic and functional mathematics will be discussed; particularly, manipulatives, calculators and other technology-mediated mathematics interventions (e.g., apps or computer programs) will be highlighted.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

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