Search results

1 – 10 of 17
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Diane Seddon, Emma Miller, Louise Prendergast, Don Williamson and Joyce Elizabeth Cavaye

There is a growing policy impetus to promote carer well-being through the provision of personalised short breaks. However, understanding of what makes for a successful…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing policy impetus to promote carer well-being through the provision of personalised short breaks. However, understanding of what makes for a successful personalised short break is limited. This paper aims to identify key evidence gaps and considers how these could be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review mapping the evidence base relevant to respite and short breaks for carers for older people, including those living with dementia, was completed. National and international literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed. The scoping review focused on well-being outcomes, identified by previous research, as being important to carers.

Findings

Most studies investigating the outcomes of short breaks for carers supporting older people focus on traditional day and residential respite care. Although there have been developments in more personalised break options for carers, research exploring their impact is scarce. There is limited knowledge about how these personalised breaks might support carers to realise important outcomes, including carer health and well-being; a life alongside caring; positive caregiving relationships; choices in caring; and satisfaction in caring. Three priority lines of inquiry to shape a future research agenda are identified: understanding what matters – evidencing personalised short break needs and intended outcomes; capturing what matters – outcomes from personalised short breaks; and commissioning, delivering and scaling up personalised short breaks provision to reflect what matters.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the development of an outcome-focused research agenda on personalised short breaks.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Diane Seddon and Catherine Robinson

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Diane Seddon, Catherine Robinson, Shirley Bowen and Mari Boyle

This paper presents some of the key findings from a study about supporting carers in employment. It describes the qualitative experiences of family carers for older people…

Abstract

This paper presents some of the key findings from a study about supporting carers in employment. It describes the qualitative experiences of family carers for older people who are in paid employment, paying particular attention to their views on assessment and service provision. The perspectives of other key stakeholders, including staff from statutory and independent sector agencies, are also considered. Support for carers in employment is one of the five priority action areas underpinning the National Strategy for Carers (DoH, 1999). However, the findings from this study reveal that carers in employment have a limited profile at strategic level and their specific needs are rarely addressed in mainstream health and social care planning processes. The findings also suggest that assessment and care management practices are failing to support carers in relation to their employment aspirations. The effectiveness of health and social care assessments in identifying and exploring the needs of carers in employment is limited and very few separate carer assessments are completed. Carers' first‐hand experiences of service provision are described. Deficits in current services are identified and examples of good practice are highlighted. The paper concludes by outlining the implications for policy and practice. It is suggested that flexible support, underpinned by partnerships between employers and staff from statutory and independent sector agencies, is the key to supporting carers in employment.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Diane Seddon, Kate Jones and Mari Boyle

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Diane Seddon and Graham Harper

This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that sought to identify what works well in supporting older people to live in their own homes and local communities…

Abstract

This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that sought to identify what works well in supporting older people to live in their own homes and local communities. Drawing on data from six focus groups conducted with key stakeholders, including older people, carers, care managers and direct service providers, the shortcomings of existing services to meet the needs of older people are recognised and the paper seeks to move discusion forward to what might help improve provision. Examples identified during the focus groups are explored and highlight the importance of enabling older people to maintain community connections and draw on existing community facilities. To be effective, support needs to be underpinned by a person‐centred approach which takes into account individual preferences and priorities, and is organised locally to where older people live. Statutory organisations are often constrained by restrictive thinking and financial pressures lead to resourcecentred rather than person‐centred responses to individuals in need. Our findings suggest that commissioners of services should be more creative in developing flexible providers in local communities and that we consider approaches that may be helpful in achieving this and transforming support arrangements. The potential of an action research programme to explore the ideas raised and enable processes for development, outcomes for older people, their carers and the communities in which they live, as well as the costs, to be tested comparatively with traditional services is noted. The importance of capacity building and investment in the independent sector and other community partners is critical to achieving change.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Diane Seddon, Kate Jones and Mari Boyle

This article presents the key findings from a collaborative study about the experiences and support needs of carers whose relatives are admitted into a nursing or…

965

Abstract

This article presents the key findings from a collaborative study about the experiences and support needs of carers whose relatives are admitted into a nursing or residential care home. Drawing upon data from carers' qualitative accounts, it considers carers' post‐admission roles, responsibilities and profiles, and the contribution carers make to the continued care of their relative. Carers' post‐admission caring experiences are described in detail and differences between spouse carers and carers involved in looking after a parent are identified. A temporal model depicting the complex and dynamic nature of carers' postadmission experiences is presented. The implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Catherine Robinson, Diane Seddon, Vanessa Webb, Jim Hill and Judith Soulsby

This paper explores the findings from a recent study about the assessment and management of care for older people who may have a sensory impairment. Using qualitative…

Abstract

This paper explores the findings from a recent study about the assessment and management of care for older people who may have a sensory impairment. Using qualitative research methods, the work focused on non‐specialist practitioners who are responsible for the assessment and management of care for older people and their carers. The findings are based upon the analysis of in‐depth interviews with non‐specialist practitioners, specialist workers and managers from statutory and voluntary sector agencies. Older people with a hearing impairment or a visual impairment are not a homogenous group of people with a single set of needs or service support networks. It is the existence of non‐specialist practitioners, carrying out the assessment and management of care for older people that draw together in one study the three areas of visual impairment, hearing impairment and dual impairment. The findings relate to practitioners' awareness of sensory impairment in their local community; how practitioners assess and manage care; access to services; staff training and development; and, information strategies. The interface between non‐specialists and practitioners with particular expertise in sensory impairment is also examined. The implications for policy and practice are identified.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Diane Seddon, Anne Krayer, Catherine Robinson, Bob Woods and Yvonne Tommis

The authors aim to present findings from their research on the implementation of Unified Assessment (UA) policy and the work of care coordinators who oversee the delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to present findings from their research on the implementation of Unified Assessment (UA) policy and the work of care coordinators who oversee the delivery of support to older people with complex needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach included staff interviews (n=95) and focus groups (n=3).

Findings

The care coordinator role is controversial and the lack of common terminology across health and social care obscures its importance. It is seen as a social care responsibility. Limited ownership amongst healthcare professionals leads to tensions in practice. The challenges of breaking down silo thinking embedded in established professional practices are highlighted as are infrastructural and capacity deficits. Disparities between policy intentions and practice means that UA is failing to meet core objectives relating to the delivery of seamless support.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to develop and evaluate evidence‐informed interventions that test solutions to the problems faced in practice and support the delivery of more effective arrangements.

Practical implications

Practice development may be supported by: guidelines that are more prescriptive and include a formal role definition; joint training to promote shared understanding of key concepts; investment in administrative and IT infrastructures; and more coordinated direction at strategic level.

Originality/value

Over a decade has elapsed since the publication of UA Policy Guidance; however, there is limited published evidence on the effectiveness of UA policy and its translation into practice.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Ron Iphofen

90

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Ron Iphofen

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

1 – 10 of 17