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Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

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Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

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Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Judie Gannon, Diana Clayton and Anna Klenert

Purpose: This chapter aims to critically explore the nature of mentoring initiatives through the conceptual lenses of social capital and communities of practice offering a…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter aims to critically explore the nature of mentoring initiatives through the conceptual lenses of social capital and communities of practice offering a distinctive understanding of talent management (TM) innovations in the international hospitality industry.

Methodology/approach: It achieves its aim through identifying and analysing current mentoring initiatives operating in the international hospitality sector, and scrutinises how they provide a sector level approach to TM challenges.

Findings: Industry level mentoring initiatives emerge as TM innovations connecting employees within networks across the international hospitality sectors. Mentoring creates bonds and bridges between senior and junior employees beyond their own workplaces, connecting them to the industry and supporting TM by enhancing the identification of opportunities and the recognition of talent. These initiatives also act as learning communities where contemporary TM dilemmas can be explored by participants from diverse backgrounds and between generations.

Research limitations/implications: The findings rely on the identification and exploration of publically available data, and therefore future primary data collection would yield richer insights into the experiences of stakeholders of these mentoring initiatives as TM innovations.

Social implications: Mentoring initiatives can exemplify innovative ways of supporting TM and addressing diversity and inequality issues in fragmented and dispersed sectors, such as the international hospitality industry.

Originality/value of paper: The exploration of contemporary mentoring initiatives in the international hospitality industry identifies the value of cross-industry TM innovations stretching beyond stakeholders, such as educators, employers and policy-makers. It identifies mentoring initiatives as mechanisms for creating bonds and bridges between those industry aspirants at various career stages where diversity and inclusion may be a challenge in a fragmented and dispersed sector.

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Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Diana Clayton

This paper aims to explore how and why volunteers share knowledge and engage in other related knowledge activities. The paper offers an interpretation of participants…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how and why volunteers share knowledge and engage in other related knowledge activities. The paper offers an interpretation of participants’ multiple realities to enable a better understanding of managing volunteer knowledge, which ultimately underpins organisational performance and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, hermeneutic phenomenological study of volunteers (n = 28) at UK music festivals was conducted through in-depth interviews (n = 9), diaries (n = 11) or both (n = 8). This interpretivist approach adopted purposive sampling to recruit participants through (social) media.

Findings

The findings illustrate how and why volunteers share knowledge that is attributed to a successful process of volunteering, which enables effective knowledge management and knowledge reproduction. Where volunteers’ motivations are satisfied, this leads to repeat volunteering. Knowledge enablers and the removal of barriers create conditions that are conducive for knowledge sharing, which have similar characteristics to conditions for continuance commitment. Where volunteers do not return, the organisation leaks knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Although high-quality research standards were maintained, participant self-selection may result in overly positive experiences. Future research might explore the impact on knowledge sharing of negative volunteering experiences.

Practical/implications

Practical recommendations include factors that contribute to effective volunteer co-ordination and volunteering experiences, which are enablers for knowledge sharing. These fall within two categories, namely, areas for continuance (i.e. those aspects that should be maintained because they contribute to effective volunteer co- ordination and experiences) and areas for improvement (i.e. those aspects of volunteer co-ordination that are either currently lacking or require development or enhancement).

Originality/value

This paper’s original contribution is demonstrated through the use of hermeneutic phenomenological methods in the exploration of individuals’ perspectives of knowledge sharing in the context of temporary organisations. This paper provides value to academics studying knowledge management and volunteer management, and practitioners managing volunteers.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Stefan Jooss, Ralf Burbach and Huub Ruël

Abstract

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Talent Management Innovations in the International Hospitality Industry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-307-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Clayton A. Shepard

CATS provides most of the needed acquisitions operations for a typical library. It is easily mastered and straightforward, even for the most unsophisticated user. CATS is…

Abstract

CATS provides most of the needed acquisitions operations for a typical library. It is easily mastered and straightforward, even for the most unsophisticated user. CATS is versatile, flexible and essentially free of awkward demands and hidden traps. For those who already own the dBase III database package, on which CATS depends for its operation, the price of CATS is certainly an attractive one. Libraries needing instant acquisitions automation should give it serious consideration. CATS runs on IBM/PCs and compatible computers. It requires the use of the dBase III database package. CATS sells for $100 from David Morse or Alice Karasick, USC Norris Medical Library, 2003 Zonal Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. (213) 224–7413.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Hillary R. Bogner, Stephanie Abbuhl, Lucy Wolf Tuton, Bridget Dougherty, Diana Zarowin, Alejandra Guevara and Heather McClintock

Recruiting medical students into women’s health and gender-based medical research is important internationally. Medical student research training is critical for…

Abstract

Purpose

Recruiting medical students into women’s health and gender-based medical research is important internationally. Medical student research training is critical for developing future women’s health leaders who are adept at conducting high-impact research. This paper aims to describe a six-month medical student research fellowship in women’s health in terms of fellowship recipients’ publications related to their research project and future academic careers.

Design/methodology/approach

Targeted searches of fellowship recipients and their fellowship mentors were conducted in PubMed and Scopus from 2001–2017. Prior student fellows were also e-mailed and called to assess whether they held academic positions.

Findings

Since 2001, funds have been secured to support a total of 83 students (69 women, 14 men) in a mentored research experience in women’s health and gender-based medicine. In total, 48 out of the 83 (57.8%) medical student fellowship recipients published at least one peer-reviewed research paper or scientific review related to their research project. Of the 50 prior recipients with a least five years of follow-up data (41 women, 9 men), 26 (52%) were in academic careers.

Research limitations/implications

Because this is an observational study and only medical students interested in women’s health applied to be a student fellow, there is an inability to infer causality.

Practical implications

Following completion of the medical student research training fellowship in women’s health, more than half of recipients published in peer-reviewed medical journals on their research project.

Originality/value

This study explores the association of an innovative medical student experience in women’s health research on subsequent fellowship-related publications and career outcomes, contributing to the body of knowledge on the influence of a mentored research leadership program for medical students on academic professional development.

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Diana Ramirez and Suzanne D. Gyeszly

Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries is a member of two consortiums that include academic and public libraries. Both consortiums purchased access to netLibrary e‐books…

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Abstract

Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries is a member of two consortiums that include academic and public libraries. Both consortiums purchased access to netLibrary e‐books for their members. Approximately 92 libraries within the Amigos Library Services consortium jointly purchased roughly 10,000 e‐books. The Texas State Library and Archives Commission (TSLAC), which oversees a consortium of approximately 700 state‐supported libraries, purchased roughly 9,000 e‐books. TAMU purchased an additional 193 e‐books for its own collection. The purpose of this project was to explore the use of netLibrary as an electronic collection development tool. The Library Extranet, netLibrary’s data‐gathering software, provided information necessary to compare usage based on subject categories. Data was cumulated for a total of 270 days comparing TAMU’s usage to that of the combined consortiums. Final analysis and results are provided. Collection development librarians will use these results to fine‐tune the future growth of TAMU and consortium collections.

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Collection Building, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Susan E. Reid

The purpose of this paper is to challenge Cold War binaries, seeking a more nuanced understanding of popular experience of change in the Soviet Union’s last decades. This…

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1073

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge Cold War binaries, seeking a more nuanced understanding of popular experience of change in the Soviet Union’s last decades. This was a period of intensive modernization and rapid transformation in Soviet citizens’ everyday material environment, marked by the mass move to newly constructed housing and by changing relations with goods.

Design/methodology/approach

To probe popular experience and changing meanings, the paper turns to qualitative, subjective sources, drawing on oral history interviews (Everyday Aesthetics in the Modern Soviet Flat, 2004-2007).

Findings

The paper finds that qualitative changes took place in Soviet popular consumer culture during the 1960s-1970s, as millions of people made home in new housing amid the widespread media circulation of authoritative images representing a desirable modern lifestyle and modernist aesthetic. Soviet people began to make aesthetic or semiotic distinctions between functionally identical goods and were concerned to find the right furniture to fit a desired lifestyle, aesthetic ideal and sense of self.

Research limitations/implications

The problem is how to conceptualize the trajectory of change in ways that do justice to historical subjects’ experience and narratives, while avoiding uncritically reproducing Cold War binaries or perpetuating the normative status claimed by the postwar West in defining modernity and consumer culture.

Originality/value

The paper challenges dominant Cold War narratives, according to which Soviet popular relations with goods were encompassed by shortage and necessity. It advances understanding of the specific form of modern consumer culture, which, it argues, took shape in the USSR after Stalin.

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Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2018

Carla Gonzalez, Jessica Graber, Diana Galvez and Leslie Ann Locke

In this study, the authors investigated the academic and social experiences of first-generation undergraduate Latinx students who participated in a Latinx student-focused…

Abstract

In this study, the authors investigated the academic and social experiences of first-generation undergraduate Latinx students who participated in a Latinx student-focused organization at a large, research-intensive, Predominately White Institution (PWI) in the Midwest. Our results revealed three major themes. First, participants considered the Latinx student organization to be a significant resource for their social integration into the university; however, it was less significant as an academic resource. Second, the participants recognized that while the university “tries” to promote diversity, they felt that the university could do more in promoting ethnic student groups and their interests across campus. Third, participants perceived that the university treats all Latinx students as one homogenous group, ignoring the diversity that exists between different Latinx groups. These themes suggest that efforts to make PWIs more diverse and inclusive may benefit from the formation and maintenance of minoritized ethnic student organizations. PWIs would also benefit by incorporating the diverse Latinx student perspectives into institutional diversity policy, and prioritizing higher-quality initiatives for greater visibility of Latinx student issues across campus. Moreover, programming that does not aggregate or homogenize Latinx identity, but embraces and values the multifaceted Latinx identities, would also benefit PWIs.

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Perspectives on Diverse Student Identities in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-053-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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