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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Diana L. Burley and Gayatri Pandit

This case study aims to describe the lessons learned from the implementation of a Lessons Learned Knowledge Management System (LLKMS) at Global Safety Assistance (GSA), a

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1177

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to describe the lessons learned from the implementation of a Lessons Learned Knowledge Management System (LLKMS) at Global Safety Assistance (GSA), a US Department of Defense contractor working in support of a global security initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was designed around five related objectives to examine the knowledge integration and transfer processes of GSA. Schwandt's Organizational Learning Systems Model (OLSM) was used to conceptualize the study and inform the findings. The OLSM describes the organizational transformation process whereby information is converted into useful knowledge. The authors worked collaboratively with GSA staff to gather observations about GSA knowledge integration strategies and their relative effectiveness through semi‐structured interviews, participant observation, and the analysis of internal documents.

Findings

GSA's LLKMS implementation strategy attempted to simultaneously change organizational culture, individual behavior, group communication patterns, and technology use. This strategy inhibited the implementation of the LLKMS because it underestimated the impact of key organizational realities such as the silo structure, existing communication patterns and information sharing processes, and critical elements of the organizational culture.

Originality/value

This paper discusses GSA's implementation strategy, identifies specific challenges resulting from the attempt to simultaneously change multiple organizational processes and individual behaviors, and provides practical recommendations for future LLKMS implementations.

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Diana Burley, Sydney Savion, Mathew Peterson, Gaetano Lotrecchiano and Navid Keshavarz‐Nia

This conceptual article aims to explore the current state of knowledge management systems, to describe the potential role of synthetic worlds for knowledge integration

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1243

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual article aims to explore the current state of knowledge management systems, to describe the potential role of synthetic worlds for knowledge integration, and to suggest a future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the constraints of current knowledge management systems outlined in Alavi and Tiwana as a guiding structure, this article explores knowledge integration through a synthetic world and outlines several propositions intended to frame existing knowledge and guide the development of future inquiry.

Findings

Current knowledge management systems neither exploit the capabilities of high performance computing, nor adequately address organizational challenges presented by increasingly knowledge‐laden, dispersed, global organizations. The limitations of current systems: constraints on transactive memory, insufficient mutual understanding, limited retention of contextual knowledge, and inflexibility of organizational ties; can be effectively addressed through the synthetic world environment.

Originality/value

Debate regarding the role of Web 2.0 in twenty‐first century knowledge management continues. In order to move this debate forward, the Web 2.0 phenomenon must be unbundled and the role a specific virtual environment may play considered. To that end, this article explores the potential role of synthetic worlds for organizational knowledge management and integration. It heightens awareness and generates dialogue that fosters an appreciation of the emerging synthetic world environment.

Details

VINE, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Diana Burley, Cathy Gnam, Robin Newman, Howard Straker and Tanika Babies

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptually the role of higher education consortia in facilitating the operational advancement of member institutions, and in…

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888

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptually the role of higher education consortia in facilitating the operational advancement of member institutions, and in enabling their development as learning organizations in a changing and competitive higher education environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This article synthesizes the literature on higher education consortia and organizational learning and develops propositions to support future inquiry.

Findings

While some institutions of higher education do indeed learn, the power that consortia hold to extend, expand, and exploit this learning may represent a vast, untapped resource. Through a better understanding of the role that consortium participation may play in organizational learning, a roadmap may be generated for higher education institutions to achieve the cultural and strategic shifts necessary to develop new directions for the delivery of educational content. This enhanced understanding also may help sustain the culture of, and innovative practices used by, learning organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Consortia have the potential to offer a wide variety of benefits to institutions of higher education through innovative structure, operations, and delivery methods, generating tremendous potential for institutions of higher education to become more effective learning organizations.

Originality/value

As institutions of higher learning continue to form collaborative partnerships through higher education consortia, interesting questions arise about the potential unexplored value of these institutional networks. This article suggests that the interplay of diverse practices and sharing of related organizational knowledge across institutions may provide an opportunity for learning and adaptation within them.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Niall Sinclair

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513

Abstract

Details

VINE, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Jayanthi Ranjan

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277

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Rian Diana and Qonita Rachmah

This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition interventions conducted in pregnant adolescents and their implications for future research.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition interventions conducted in pregnant adolescents and their implications for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The papers in this systematic study were searched through PubMed, PMC, the Cochrane Library (Trial), ScienceDirect and Google Scholar that were published from 2000 to 2019. An experimental study using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) or non-RCT among pregnant adolescents aged 10-19 years were inclusion criteria for this study. While exclusion criteria were studies published before 2000, non-experimental study and non-English-language studies.

Findings

A total of 14 studies were identified in this review. Six studies provided interventions in the form of nutrition and health education and seven studies provided interventions in the form of nutritional supplementation (calcium, vitamin D, iron-folate, lipid-based nutrient supplements and multi-micronutrient powder. One study provided dietary intervention. The interventions in pregnant adolescents in the form of education and nutritional supplementation effectively increased the knowledge and nutrition of pregnant adolescents and decreased low birth weight (LBW) and premature birth. The impact on birth outcomes was still quite diverse. Some of the studies in this review were conducted without a comparison group, a small sample size and conducted in health-care facilities.

Conclusion

This systematic review implies a future nutrition intervention for pregnant adolescents is needed to improve nutritional status of pregnant adolescents and birth outcome. Future research using double blind RCT method with bigger sample size and various nutritional outcome are wide open to be developed.

Originality/value

Interventions in pregnant adolescents effectively increased the knowledge and nutrition of pregnant adolescents and decreased LBW and premature birth. The program implementation in the community needs to be improved so that the effectiveness of the program remains optimal as in healthcare facilities.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Diana Brahams

The last 60 years have seen unprecedented advances in medical treatment. Patients' expectations for a successful outcome are now higher than at any previous time. More and…

Abstract

The last 60 years have seen unprecedented advances in medical treatment. Patients' expectations for a successful outcome are now higher than at any previous time. More and more patients are ready to sue for damages if the result is disappointing, since there is less readiness to accept that failure may not be the result of medical negligence.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Tony Kinder

The paper argues that some conventional tools guiding innovation processes inadequately analyse problems arising from blending telematics with public service integration…

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1860

Abstract

The paper argues that some conventional tools guiding innovation processes inadequately analyse problems arising from blending telematics with public service integration in areas of complex service provision. Also uses Molina’s diamond of alignment, and Nicoll’s contextual usability conceptual approaches to analyse a case study on the introduction of smart housing in West Lothian, Scotland.

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European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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56973

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1900

It is one thing to discuss the clauses of a prospective Bill; but to get that Bill through Parliament is a vastly different affair. It was at the Buxton L. A. Conference…

Abstract

It is one thing to discuss the clauses of a prospective Bill; but to get that Bill through Parliament is a vastly different affair. It was at the Buxton L. A. Conference, in 1896, that the matter was considered, and now, after four years' working and waiting, we have advanced just so far as to have got through the House of Lords “a Bill intituled an Act to amend the Acts relating to Public Libraries, Museums, and Gymnasiums, and to regulate the liability of managers of Libraries to proceedings for libel.” At the present moment this Bill is awaiting an opportunity of coming before the Commons. With this position it must be perfectly familiar, for it was only on account of Lord Avebury's despair at finding no opening for it in the House of Commons that the Association induced Lord Windsor to pilot it through the House of Lords. If the present Parliament lives long enough there is just a chance of the measure being entered upon the statute book; but, with forecasts of an early dissolution confronting us, and with Mr. Balfour's recent announcement of the Government appropriation of private members’ days this session, the prospect is not particularly encouraging. If these slender hopes are not realised, the Bill will be none the forwarder for passing the Upper House; whilst, if it should be so fortunate as to pass the Commons without further amendment, it would at once pass into law. Lord Balcarres has been good enough to take charge of the Bill in the House of Commons, and as it is well “backed,” and has been pruned down by the Standing Committee, and has really nothing of a contentious nature in its provisions, we may reasonably hope that if it once gets a start in the House it will reach a successful finish.

Details

New Library World, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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